Clean install of Mac OS X

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by SteveMcQ, Nov 14, 2005.

  1. SteveMcQ macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2005
    #1
    Is there anything I should be on the lookout for or some guide I can read or is it fairly straightforward? Am I really bound to free up a GB or two or is only a few MBs with the programs/options/drivers I won't be needing?

    I just wanted to make sure there's not too many options I won't understand that I might leave off that might screw me over in the long run. I haven't made a clean install on any Macs before, so I'd appreciate your input.

    Is there a way to save any of the settings I have now (went through the initial setup process when I first got it)?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Eniregnat macrumors 68000

    Eniregnat

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2003
    Location:
    In your head.
    #2
    It's easy to do a clean install. The longest part is if you decide to do a security delete. It is still a lost of work, especially if you have a lot of apps to reload.

    There are those that would steer you against this. Their primary argument is usually based around the fact that they don't see a need for it. They tend to be right.

    It is likely you will free up GB, but not because the installation deleted all sorts of hidden cashes, files and the like that aren't necessary. It is likely to delete all sorts of things that you haven’t used or remember having.

    Delocalizer will defiantly free up space.[/URL]. ONYX is just about the coolest example of how powerful AppleScript can be. It can free up space, and you should have it anyway. If you using P2P software, clean out thoes caches, and any unfinished files.

    Why do you need/want to do a clean install?
     
  3. SteveMcQ thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2005
    #4
    I figured if I were to gain another GB or two from it, now would be the best time to do it. The only apps I have installed are the factory pre-installed ones so it'd be less of a problem now, plus I haven't transferred any of my files over to it yet.

    Then again, I think the 90+GB on the 120GB HDD should be sufficient, but I'm just looking long term. I'm a bit worried though that I will end up getting rid of something I'll need later down the line. So I guess it's a trade off--a GB or so later, or having something I need that I didn't install. Something to think about anyway.

    Thanks.
     
  4. p0intblank macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2005
    Location:
    New Jersey
    #5
    I only have 16 GB of free space right now. I've been debating whether I should format or not. I would have a lot of files to back-up...
     
  5. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    Location:
    Palookaville
    #6
    I am one of the chief clean install nay-sayers who will advise you against the entire procedure. Unless your hard drive has failed, you are selling the Mac and want it zeroed out, or your system has been truly hosed, little or nothing can be accomplished by clean installs that cannot be accomplished more quickly and safely with basic maintenance procedures.

    The thing that really irritates me about the epidemic of clean installs, aside from how truly unnecessary they are, is how they seem to be seeping into the Mac from the Windows world of auto-hosing OSs. OSX is not Windows. It doesn't self-immolate. It's a Mac advantage -- use it, don't lose it.

    Just say "no" to clean installs. That's my credo.
     
  6. Eniregnat macrumors 68000

    Eniregnat

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2003
    Location:
    In your head.
    #7
    His advice is sound.


    I am one who reformats my HD every couple of years. I do this as part of a cathartic process, not to make the system more stable. I have tendency to load in the apps. and datafiles that I need, instead of carrying around everything. I like to run a lean machine. I have clutter and packratting issues, so I have to force myself to keep things clean and orgnized.

    While reformatting may get you more space, a spare HD, with the files that you do not use moved, along with a copy of your current HD is a better way to get space.

    Delocalizer will free up space by deleating unused language documentation and information from your HD. It runs under Tiger. With out FCP and my other editing programs, I just freed up 158mb. I somehow remember freeing up nearly a gig the first time I ran it. But I also had a lot of media editing programs loaded (FCP, LiveType, etc...).
     
  7. Eniregnat macrumors 68000

    Eniregnat

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2003
    Location:
    In your head.
  8. mklos macrumors 68000

    mklos

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2002
    Location:
    My house!
    #9
    I beg to differ... I've have never improved anything by doing anything other than an erase and install. I've tried doing an archive and install and it screwed up everything and I ended up doing an erase and install anyways. Say YES to erase and installs!!!!! Every Mac I've ever worked on, I've done clean installs and the end user is MUCH better off!

    That being said...I only reformat my HD about once a year, and when doing a dot upgrade (OS X.3 to OS X.4). Doing an upgrade there is NEVER a good idea!
     
  9. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    Location:
    Palookaville
    #10
    Upgrades are fine. I've been doing them since OSX 10.0 with no problems. In fact my primary desktop started out running OS 9.x and is now running Tiger without any issues whatsoever. All standard upgrades. I would absolutely hate owning any computer that required fresh OS installs -- ever, let alone frequently. Thankfully, I own Macs, which don't.

    Since I don't know what you've tried for ordinary maintenance, I have to assume based your comments that you aren't doing much, or at least, not the right things.
     
  10. mklos macrumors 68000

    mklos

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2002
    Location:
    My house!
    #11
    I'd consider you one of the lucky ones on the Upgrades. You look at the problems people have after upgrading from X.3 to X.4 and 95% of them are actual upgrades and not erase and installs, and they usually end up doing an erase and install anyways. Not everyone is a Mac Genius and knows how to keep their computer clean. You have to realize that! Most people just use the damn thing until it dies.

    My Macs are fine. Like I said, I only reformat once a year. Its other Macs that I've worked on. Its just safer to erase and reload everything. Doesn't take very long anyways. Then I know there isn't going to be some stupid problem because there's an old file conflicting with a newer one. Yes, that does happen, even with OS X. When you drive 50+ miles to fix a Mac, you make damn sure its done right the first time.
     
  11. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    Location:
    Palookaville
    #12
    "Only" once a year? I'd consider that to be an unmitigated disaster!

    No, I'm not particularly lucky, nor do I do anything very special in terms of maintenance. I have several Macs, and they all get upgraded in the same way -- straight installs, which work, all of the time, all the way from 9.x to 10.4. Everybody I know outside of the MacRumors boards does it that way, too, and without incident. These boards will give you a very distorted idea of what is required and what isn't. Simply, clean installs are not necessary. They are not normal maintenance.

    I would also disagree fundamentally with the premise that it's somehow "safer" to start from scratch. If you don't mind the disruption, and the very real possibility that you'll lose something critically important, then maybe it's less complicated than doing some basic, simple maintenance. But I can't imagine such a situation. Hardly a week goes by on these boards when somebody doesn't post a thread pleading to know how to get something back that they lost in a clean install. Oy. And this is safer?
     
  12. SteveMcQ thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2005
    #13
    Thanks for all the tips. Like I said, I just got my PB, so I'm not really hampered by having to reinstall a bunch of programs. Looks like there isn't all that much reason for me to do a clean install right now, though. I'll just be on the lookout on some more reading concerning basic upkeeps on the system. Thanks again.
     

Share This Page