Cleaning Up LP noise

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by numediaman, May 17, 2004.

  1. numediaman macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2004
    Location:
    Chicago (by way of SF)
    #1
    This question concerns cleaning up the audio when you convert your old LPs to digital:

    When I used to be on OS 8.6, I would use CD Spin Doctor, software that comes bundled with Toast. I'm now on Panther and I need new software to clean up audio with. I still have Toast and the version of CD Spin Doctor that comes with it -- but the new version has to be the worst piece of software ever written. All the old features have been ruined in the converstion to OS X.

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. numediaman thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2004
    Location:
    Chicago (by way of SF)
    #2
    I'm posting again to my own thread in hopes somebody has a suggestion for me.
     
  3. wrldwzrd89 macrumors G5

    wrldwzrd89

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2003
    Location:
    Solon, OH
    #3
    I use Sound Studio for cleaning up pops and other brief, annoying noises in my audio files. I got it for free with my iMac - check your Applications folder to see if it's there (it will be in a folder called 'Sound Studio'). If you didn't get it with your Mac, the software isn't free - but there ARE free utilities that can do the same thing; check http://www.versiontracker.com/.
     
  4. dvdh macrumors 6502

    dvdh

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2004
    #4
    SoundStudio does a decent job.

    I have used SoundStudio for a few albums as well. It works fairly well, although is a little time consuming since you have to go through the entire albums and manually flatten the pops. (I think it is also available on line as trial)

    I did try SoundForge 7 (on a peecee) to do the same thing. SF has an automatic clean up vinyl option, but the end result is much worse than using SoundStudio. The auto functions take out more than just the pops in general, significantly dampening the entire high spectrum. It's a great way to make vinyl sound 'flat' but a really bad way to get a good recording.

    On another note, for best results, it would probably be advisable to use an external Analog to Digital convert (if you aren't already). The line in on most computers . . . macs included is usually of a fairly sketchy quality. Additionally, given the soundcard is only a few inches from the power supply, you can expect to loss quite a bit of quality. An external moves the convertor away from all the interference in the computer case and separates the conversion circuitry from the power supply.
     
  5. numediaman thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2004
    Location:
    Chicago (by way of SF)
    #5
    Thanks for the input.

    I convert my LPs using my old 8600 (believe it or not). It has RCA jack inputs (if you remember). I simply hook up a cheap Radio Shack amp to the computer and capture using Premiere. The results, believe it or not, are top notch. I've converted over a hundred LPs to CD.

    DVDH, I understand what you are saying concerning using software to clean up LPs. To do a professional job you have to painstakingly go through each cut and only clean what is absolutely necessary -- usually loud pops. Otherwise, the quality of the sound is diminished.

    Most of my high quality vinyl -- Japanese jazz pressings, and German classical pressings -- have been converted. What's left is vinyl of lesser quality.

    Thanks again.
     
  6. PrometheusG5 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2004
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #6
    I asked the same question awhile ago... :)

    I used Sound Studio (it was only $50), then switched to Peak and SoundSoap. I tried using Ray Gun, but I thought the whole thing was so complicated. SoundSoap is OK - its "Learn Noise" function works pretty wel, although sometimes the resulting file needs some gain adjustment in Peak.

    Has ANYONE used Ray Gun or (bleech) CD Spin Doctor 2 successfully?
     

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