ColorSync? What is It? How Do I Use It?

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by jaw04005, Oct 18, 2003.

  1. jaw04005 macrumors 601

    jaw04005

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2003
    Location:
    AR
    #1
    Hey guys,

    I just purchased a new Powerbook 12", and a Canon S9000 wide-format printer. I want to use colorsync so I can make sure the Powerbook's LCD and what comes out of the printer are the same. How do I do this? I also have Photoshop 7, if there are any settings that need to be adjusted in it.


    Thanks

    Josh
     
  2. Plutoniq macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2003
    #2
    You must first calibrate your LCD screen and create a Monitor ICC Profile. The best and only reliable way to achieve this is to buy a USB colorimeter. This is a hardware unit that comes with bundled software to create a accurate ICC profile for your LCD/CRT screen. The unit sits on your screen and the software goes through an automatic calibration test, testing different ranges of luminosities for RGB channels.......it will then create a ICC profile file for your LCD, so that what you see on the screen is "really" correct.

    I recommend the Pantone USB Spyder with PhotoCAL. With rebates available now, this unit can be had for about US$150. It is worth every penny.

    The Calibrated LCD ICC profile should be set in the OSX "Display" in system preferences.

    A cheaper software only App to specificaly create LCD ICC profiles exists called "SuperCAL". Although better than no calibration at all, it really doesn't even come close to a true hardware calibration unit. The difference it made to my Pismo screen is incredible, accurate rich colors.

    Last step is to download the an ICC profile for your specific Printer. This should be available at Cannon's site?

    Put this file in your OSX colorsync profile folder. When you are working in photoshop, go to the Menu "Proof Colors".........chose custom and load your printer profile. Exit and make sure "Proof Colors" and "Gamma Warning" is checked.

    This should hopefully get your prints pretty close to what you see on your screen.

    Seeya
     
  3. Plutoniq macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2003
    #3
    I meant to say that though SuperCAL is a "better-than-nothing" solution, the differences i experienced between SuperCAL & a the hardware USB Spyder were huge...... If you are serious about accurate Screen-2-print process on a Powerbook, hardware calibration is the only real solution.
     
  4. jaw04005 thread starter macrumors 601

    jaw04005

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2003
    Location:
    AR
    #4
    Thanks.

    Thanks so much. I think you gave me enough to get me started.

    Josh
     
  5. cb911 macrumors 601

    cb911

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2002
    Location:
    BrisVegas, Australia
    #5
    is it really possible to calibrate a screen (LCD or CRT) so that the difference between the printout and the on-screen appearance is not noticable?

    in my experience you can never get the colours on screen to match exactly the colours on the printed product. or can hardware calibration acheive this?
     
  6. BoyRacer macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2003
    #6
    as close a match a possible

    I think the whole point of ColorSync is to provide a means of getting as close to a match as possible; given that one picture is produced by light and the other is produced by ink, theres not much hope of actually achieving a perfect match - two entirely different media.
     

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