Converting to AAC for arrival of G2 shuffle

Discussion in 'iPod' started by mynameismatt89, Oct 20, 2006.

  1. mynameismatt89 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2005
    #1
    I just ordered the new Shuffle and was reading about it supporting AAC files. I looked at some of my songs and most of them are MPEG. So i converted a song to AAC and noticed it was alot smaller in size (7.7 MB to 4 MB)!! Can i do this to all of my songs? Will it create sme type of problem for my shuffle? OR would it not matter if i convert them all to AAC?

    I'm interesed in doing this because if i do this i can obviously put more songs onto the shuffle.

    Thanks,
    Matt
     
  2. mynameismatt89 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Aug 19, 2005
    #2
    Oh, also, can i make it so that when and if i convert them all they do not create a duplicate, rather replace the existing ones?
     
  3. WildCowboy Administrator/Editor

    WildCowboy

    Staff Member

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    Jan 20, 2005
    #3
    AAC is "more efficient" than MP3...meaning that, to most people, AAC-encoded sound files sound better than the same ones encoded in MP3 format.

    That said, the bitrate is very important...in order to shrink the filesizes as you have done, you have decreased the bitrate, which decreases the quality. What was your MP3 bitrate and what is your AAC bitrate? It looks like you did something like take a 256 kbps MP3 file and convert it to 128 kbps AAC. You shrunk the size, but you've also likely lost a bit of quality. But that loss may not be noticeable to you, especially for playing on a shuffle in the noisy real world. But 128 kbps AAC should sound better than 128 kbps MP3 would have.

    The shuffle will play both MP3 and AAC formats, so there's no real worry there. You just need to find a bitrate that gives you a quality you can live with. Most of the songs from the iTunes Store come in 128 kbps AAC, and that's fine for a lot of people, but not necessarily for audiophiles.

    The other issue is transcoding. You've taken compressed MP3 files and converted them to a different compressed format (AAC). This can cause some distortion, as you now have the effects of two types of compression in a single file. If your MP3s were ripped from your CDs, it's best to go back to the original CDs and re-rip the songs in AAC format rather than converting the old MP3 files.

    If you want to get rid of duplicates, there are a couple ways to do it efficiently. First, if you highlighted a bunch of songs and then converted them, the original songs should remain highlighted, with the new ones interspersed. If you hit delete, it should delete all of the old ones. Another way is that if they're in different bitrates, you can sort your library by bitrate, which will cluster all of the new ones and old ones separately.
     
  4. mynameismatt89 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Aug 19, 2005
    #4
    The file that i converted's bitrate was 256, and now it is 128. I tested out the sound quality by plugging headphones into my ibook, and it seems to be the same. But with your reply, it seems you suggest i do not convert them to AAC? Now i still cannot decide on whether i should risk doing it or not.

    Thanks alot for the long and detailed response:) it is greatly appreciated
     
  5. WildCowboy Administrator/Editor

    WildCowboy

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2005
    #5
    If you're perfectly happy with the way the songs sound and you're just going to listen to them from your iPod or iBook through cheap headphones, by all means go ahead and convert them...it's a quick and dirty way to do it.

    But if you're planning on sending them through a high-end audio system at some point, you will very likely be able to hear imperfections.
     
  6. Nermal Moderator

    Nermal

    Staff Member

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    Dec 7, 2002
    Location:
    New Zealand
    #6
    If you put the original CD in and re-import, then iTunes will give you the option to replace the existing files. This will also give you better sound quality, as you'll reclaim the bits of the music that MP3 "threw away" :)
     
  7. mynameismatt89 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Aug 19, 2005
    #7
    hmmm, well i do hook my ibook up to my stereo... so i dont want it to sound crappy... i guess i better leave it in the format it is. Thanks guys :)
     
  8. mynameismatt89 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Aug 19, 2005
    #8
    well now that i connect it to my stereo... i dont hear a difference at all haha, perhaps i will convert them.
     
  9. ehayut macrumors member

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    Jun 29, 2005
    #9
    128kbps is a perfectly fine bitrate. 95% of people won't be able to hear the difference between 128kbps or anything higher anyway.
     
  10. Tom B. macrumors 65816

    Tom B.

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    Mar 22, 2006
    Location:
    London
    #10
    With the iPod shuffle (well at least with the first generation one), you can set it to automaticly convert all songs to 128kbps AAC before they are copied. This souds ideal for your situation, because you will be able to fit more songs on your iPod shuffle, it will not leave duplicate songs on your iBook and the music on your iBook will still be higher quality for playing through your stereo. I hope that helps. :)
     
  11. mynameismatt89 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Aug 19, 2005
    #11
    OH, alright, thanks Tom... but ive already started to convert my songs and more than half of them are done :( . Will the new shuffle be able to do this as the old shuffle did? So now i might have to go and delete all 128kbs copied files. Darn

    Matt
     
  12. Tom B. macrumors 65816

    Tom B.

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    Mar 22, 2006
    Location:
    London
    #12
    I am fairly sure that the new iPod shuffle will keep that feature, although, there is no way I can guaretee it. The only problem, is that it does take a long time to do, especially if you don't have USB 2.0. So, if you are going to be re-filling your iPod shuffle every day, it may be worth keeping your converted songs.
     

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