Creating Apple //e images

Discussion in 'Apple Collectors' started by JakeLight, Aug 17, 2006.

  1. JakeLight macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2006
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    #1
    What I have:

    An Apple //e (drives and monitor and such)
    An unused Super Serial card

    Mac LCIII with PDS //e emulator card, with cable and drive.
    -for some reason this gets an error, but I think it's related to the version of the OS I have installed

    What I want to do:

    Convert Apple //e 5 1/4 floppies into .dsk files that run on a pc emulator.

    My brother wrote a lot of programs when he was in high school and I would like to archive and convert them as a birthday present, but I have not been able to locate directions as to how to do this.

    If anyone can advise me on how to do this I would be greatly appreciative!

    Thanks,

    Jake
     
  2. DZ/015 macrumors 6502a

    DZ/015

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2003
    Location:
    New England
    #2
    Tons of good Apple II info on the old faq. Specifically, this topic discusses using dsk2file to create/use dsk images.
     
  3. David Schmidt macrumors 6502

    David Schmidt

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2006
    Location:
    Southeastern USA
    #3
  4. JakeLight thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2006
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    #4
    Thanks for the info, I have a weekend set aside in my near future to see what I can come up with on this front. I have a seriously large collection of stuff that I would like to preserve.

    btw, I grew up in Chapel Hill (currently in Austin)...my folks are still out there.

    Dave, are you familiar with this process or are you merely pointing me in the right direction?

    Jake

     
  5. David Schmidt macrumors 6502

    David Schmidt

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2006
    Location:
    Southeastern USA
    #5
    Ah, very nice town (both). My boss is in Austin. :)

    A little of both, I hope. :) I wrote ADTPro, which will transfer any block-oriented device you can plug into an Apple II. But for just 5-1/4" floppies, you really only need the original ADT, a Super Serial card and a cable.

    Getting bootstrapped is the only tricky bit.

    Once you download ADT to your host computer (a PC for ADT, though ADTPro ought to work on a Mac too) you have to get the client side shifted over to the Apple. It's easier if you already have a DOS diskette. But ADT comes in a version blown into little bits that you can slowly send to the Apple that literally types it into the Monitor (think IN#2). Once you have the client on the Apple, things start to go a lot faster.

    http://www.apple2.org.za/gswv/a2zine/Sel/dos33dmp.htm has all the nitty gritty details about these bootstraping kinds of things. Then, look for adt.dmp and adtn_dmp_info.txt in your original ADT distribution for the ADT specifics.
     

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