creating iso

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by Gokhan, Mar 6, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Gokhan macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2003
    Location:
    London
    #1
    hi

    i got some files that i would like to create a iso image with and then transfer to my usb key are there apps that can do this for osx say like ultraiso for pc ?

    thanks
     
  2. After G macrumors 68000

    After G

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2003
    Location:
    California
    #2
    You can make a disk image with disk utility, and then put the files in there.
     
  3. ~Shard~ macrumors P6

    ~Shard~

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2003
    Location:
    1123.6536.5321
    #3
    Disk Utility is all you need my friend - it's built right into your OS, no need for a 3rd party app whatsoever. :cool:
     
  4. Gokhan thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2003
    Location:
    London
    #4
    k

    so can someone plz tel me idiot terms how to make a iso image with disk utility plz

    thanks
     
  5. Gokhan thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2003
    Location:
    London
    #5
    k

    tried creating a cd/dvd master and changing ext to iso but still no go anyone ???
     
  6. skubish macrumors 68030

    skubish

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2005
    Location:
    Ann Arbor, Michigan
  7. Gokhan thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2003
    Location:
    London
    #7
    k

    tried that did not work there must be a app that creates an iso image that i can transport not just burn to disk !!!

    plz anyone
     
  8. After G macrumors 68000

    After G

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2003
    Location:
    California
    #8
    What exactly is stopping you from putting the CD image onto your USB key?

    It may have ".dmg" at the end, but it works the same way as an ISO.
     
  9. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #9
    I think they want a "real" .iso file though.
     
  10. Spectrum macrumors 6502a

    Spectrum

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    UK
    #10
    On- and Off-Topic at the same time, but: What's an iso ?
     
  11. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #11
    It's a disk image. It's just like a .dmg in terms that they're BOTH disk images and function the same way in OS X. An .iso image is a bit more universal and has more support outside of OS X.
     
  12. Gokhan thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2003
    Location:
    London
    #12
    k

    i need an iso as i am gonna put stuff on a certain device that only accepts iso images please help this is driving me mad !!!
     
  13. ~Shard~ macrumors P6

    ~Shard~

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2003
    Location:
    1123.6536.5321
    #14
    An ISO image is an informal term for a disk image of an ISO 9660 file system. More loosely, it refers to any optical disk image, even a UDF image.

    As is typical for disk images, in addition to the data files that are contained in the ISO image, it also contains all the filesystem metadata (boot code, structures, and attributes). All of this information is contained in a single file. These properties make it an attractive alternative to physical media for the distribution of software which requires this additional information as it is simple to retrieve over the net. :cool:
     
  14. Gokhan thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2003
    Location:
    London
    #15
    k

    that helps but i really want app to that for me and plus i dont want to convert a dmg i just want create the iso first

    thanks though !!!
     
  15. Peterkro macrumors 68020

    Peterkro

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2004
    Location:
    Communard de Londres
    #16
    It is 5.30am but if I'm reading this right Toast 7 can do this,sorry for long post:

    Making an ISO 9660 Disc
    ISO 9660 is a standard for cross-platform use on Macintosh, Windows, Unix, Linux, or DOS operating systems. ISO 9660 also supports appendable sessions, where all sessions appear as a single disc, in contrast to the Mac Only multi-session, where each session appears as a separate icon. However, ISO 9660 does not support custom features of the Mac file system, such as long file names and view or icon options, so it is not the best choice if you intend to access this disc only on a Macintosh computer.
    To make an ISO 9660 disc:
    1 Click the Data tab at the top of the Toast window.
    2 Click the Formats tab in the left drawer and choose ISO 9660.
    3 Drag and drop files and folders into the Content Area from your hard disk.
    4 Click Select to configure the ISO disc. There are three configuration tabs:
    • Files: Selecting the data.
    • Layout: Determining the layout or order of the files on the disc.
    • Settings: Setting the options for file naming and formatting.
    5 Click the Files tab to add, remove or rename files and folders to the disc.
    6 You can optionally do any of the following:
    • Click New to create a new disc or folder.
    • Click Add to add files or folders.
    • You can also import data from a prior session. See Importing ISO Sessions. Select an item and click Remove to remove it.
    • Double-click on any item in the list to change the name or make it invisible. These changes do not affect the original item on your hard disk, only the recorded disc.
    • Select the Resolve Aliases option to ensure that if the source data contains aliases, Toast will find the original file and record this to the disc instead of the alias. This option is recommended if you intend to use this disc on a Windows or Unix computer, and should be selected prior to adding files and folders.
    7 Click the layout tab to change the order of the files.
    You can optionally change the order in which the files are physically written on the disc. The files located at the top of the list are written first, toward the inner part of the disc. To move files, drag and drop them to the new position.
    8 Click the Settings tab to change file naming and format options.
    • Format: Choose CD-ROM XA if you want to be able to add sessions at a later time. Choose CD-ROM if you intend to duplicate this CD at a replication plant, are writing an ISO DVD, or are using an older CD-ROM drive that can only read this format.
    • Naming: Choose Joliet (MS-DOS + Windows) and Use Apple Extensions. This offers the most compatibility with Macintosh, Windows and Unix computers. Toast will adjust the file and folder names appropriately for each system. See ISO Disc Naming Options.
    Click Set Defaults to use these settings as the default for future ISO 9660 discs.
    9 Click Done.
    10 Insert a blank recordable CD or DVD.
    You can also insert a previously recorded ISO CD that was created with CD-ROM XA format and left "open" for additional sessions.
    11 Click the red Record button and choose a recorder from the list and optional recording settings, such as "Number of Copies."
    • Multi-session CDs: If you are making an ISO CD and would like to leave the disc "open" so you can record additional data sessions at a later time, click the Advanced tab and choose Write Session. You can now continue to add data to this CD until you have exceeded its capacity or you choose Write Disc to "close" it. You can append the sessions so they appear as a single icon on your Desktop. You cannot make multi-session DVDs.
    12 Click Record to continue.
    Toast displays a progress bar and status information as it records your disc.
    If you have inserted a previously recorded ISO CD that was left "open" for additional sessions. You will be prompted with Multisession recording options:
    • Ignore Existing Sessions: Adds the new data to a new session - ALL old data will be inaccessible.
    • Append To Session: Adds the new data to the existing session - both new and old data will be accessible.
    • Incremental Backup: Adds only new data that has changed from the old session - both new and old data will be accessible.
     
  16. After G macrumors 68000

    After G

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2003
    Location:
    California
    #17
    A few things:

    1) If you don't want to buy Toast, Disk Utility is your best bet.
    2) You can make a dmg first, and then convert it to iso format.
    3) CD/DVD Master, according to macosxhints, is the same as ISO format.

    Just wondering what was no-go exactly? The .cdr extension that Disk Utility uses can be changed to .iso with no problems. Burned fine/opened fine on PCs in my experience.
     
  17. Gokhan thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2003
    Location:
    London
    #18
    k

    ok i will come clean i need to make a psp game an iso image (ghost in the shell) so i tried making a dmg and converting to cd/dvd master no go and tried dmg then cd/dvd master still no go any help
     
  18. ~Shard~ macrumors P6

    ~Shard~

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2003
    Location:
    1123.6536.5321
    #19
    I believe it is illegal to make copies of PSP games. As a result, you will not find any help on these Forums to assist you in breaking the law, and this thread will be closed. :cool:
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page