Daisy?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by SpookTheHamster, Nov 13, 2006.

  1. SpookTheHamster macrumors 65816

    SpookTheHamster

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2004
    Location:
    London
    #1
    Ever since I've known macs (since I was a little kiddie, playing with huge beasts at my Dad's work) I've called the cmd key the "daisy" key. My Dad and all his colleagues at the time called it this.

    Has anyone else heard people call it this, or is it something they made up themselves?

    Also, is there a key combination to type it?
     
  2. Mr. Durden macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2005
    Location:
    Colorado
    #2
    Ive never heard it called daisy. The earliest thing I can remember it being called is "open apple". Not sure why it was called that... maybe there used to be a "solid" or "closed apple"?

    The only things other than that I can remember it being called are "command" and "apple". I guess "daisy" works though as long as everyone knows what you mean.
     
  3. WildCowboy Administrator/Editor

    WildCowboy

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2005
    #3
    I have heard it called the "daisy key," although the more generic "flower key" was more popular in my experience back in the day.

    It's 2318 in Unicode.
     
  4. mpw Guest

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2004
    #4
    I kinda assumed it was an 'infinite loop', but never really understood why they had both it and the Apple logo on it. I always want the apple key to drop down the Apple menu.
     
  5. iMeowbot macrumors G3

    iMeowbot

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2003
    #5
    It has many names (pretzel, clover, flower, etc.) , but it's really just the Command key. Here's an explanation of why they did that to us.
     
  6. nbs2 macrumors 68030

    nbs2

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2004
    Location:
    A geographical oddity
    #6
    There was. It was the right Cmd, while the open apple was the left Cmd. I still struggle with "command," and call it "open apple" - I used Apples/Macs through HS and hadn't touched one in 7 years when I bought my PB. I think the closed apple ended up dying with the original "Apples," but I wouldn't put money on that.
     
  7. WildCowboy Administrator/Editor

    WildCowboy

    Staff Member

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    Jan 20, 2005
    #7
    Yes, the Apple ][s had a closed apple in addition to the open apple. I believe the closed apple key evolved into the option key on the GS.
     
  8. Mammoth macrumors 6502a

    Mammoth

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    Nov 29, 2005
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    Canada
  9. nbs2 macrumors 68030

    nbs2

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2004
    Location:
    A geographical oddity
    #9
    hmm....I thought it survived to the GS and died thereafter.

    EDIT: WP tells me that you are right, I am wrong. I bow before your superior knowledge.
     
  10. WildCowboy Administrator/Editor

    WildCowboy

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2005
    #10
    I wouldn't necessarily trust Wikipedia, but I did use GS's extensively way back when, and that's the way I remember it. But I haven't seen one in a long time, so I could be making it all up in my head. :D
     
  11. SpookTheHamster thread starter macrumors 65816

    SpookTheHamster

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2004
    Location:
    London
    #11
    Well, at least I'm not the only one calling it "daisy". I've spread it to anyone who uses my Macs, as well.

    "Command" is just so dull.
     
  12. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    Gone but not forgotten.
    #12
    It's more reasonable to think infinite loop, but you have to know where the company is located.

    I'd not seen the Apple symbol on the keys until 3-4 years ago. It was always just the command key for the longest time. Considering that Apple was using IBM System/38s and later, AS/400s, for running the business and their terminals (IBM 5250 series) had a dedicated Command key, I've always wondered if they were using special terminal emulation with the Macs.

    As far as the daisy key goes, I'd never heard that one but I've seen people make up a lot of things.
     

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