Digital Rebel N00b Help Needed!

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Kardashian, Nov 11, 2006.

  1. Kardashian macrumors 68020

    Kardashian

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2005
    Location:
    Britain.
    #1
    Hey all!

    Got my first DSLR today, and so far im 90% thrilled, 10% baffled.

    I'm glad it has the included pre-defined 'scenes' or so far, I'd be lost!

    I have a few questions to run by some non-N00bs, :):

    1. Why, on landscape or sport mode, do things blur/ghost?
    2. I like the Adobe RGB Parameter colour option, however, its only available for selection under one of the advanced scene modes, not one of the pre-defined ones. How do I get that focused, blurred image effect on portraits, but with the Adobe RGB parameter?


    Thanks very much everybody. I'm mainly doing fashion shots, and portraits, so if anyone has any tips, please let them flow.

    Thanks MR Photography Community. :D
     
  2. Kardashian thread starter macrumors 68020

    Kardashian

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  3. bearbo macrumors 68000

    bearbo

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    #3
    things usually blur when its not in focus... are they in focus?
    i dont know what ghosting is... but i'm assuming you aren't moving too much aka there aren't too much of camera shake, right?

    i cant answer 2nd question
     
  4. Kardashian thread starter macrumors 68020

    Kardashian

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    #4
    No more camera shake than when taking a normal photo.

    Its on AF, so I don't have to touch the focus settings.

    By ghosting its like certain objects in the picture are repeated faintly, like a cast off. When taking a picture using these modes, the lens takes ages between opening to take the picture, and close again.

    Everything just looks blurry. Am I supposed to use a tripod with these settings? :confused:
     
  5. bearbo macrumors 68000

    bearbo

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    #5
    what's the shutter speed of these pictures?
     
  6. Kardashian thread starter macrumors 68020

    Kardashian

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    #6
    How would I find that out? :eek:
     
  7. bearbo macrumors 68000

    bearbo

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    #7
    you should be able to find out that in "get info" in os x... or view the picture in the LCD on your camera, you should also be able to get these info

    i'm sure (altho never tried) iphoto can do it, and i know aperture and lightroom both can see it
     
  8. extraextra macrumors 68000

    extraextra

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    California
    #8
    You're doing fashion shots and portraits on a DSLR... using the pre-set modes? :eek: :p

    You might want to check your shutter speed for the first question. I flipped my XT to landscape, and noticed the shutter speed dropped down to 1/6 of a second, and when I flipped it to the sport mode (in the same settings) the shutter speed went up to 1/30.

    Ghosting can be due to a cheap UV filter on the lens, extremely bright light coming directly at the lens or from the side (though that usually causes a flare).

    Certain effects are only available in the "creative modes." You're going to have to use one of those modes. You can convert your JPEG (which I'm assuming you're using since you can't use RAW in the pre-set modes..) to aRGB in Photoshop or similar program, I believe.

    Just use 'Av'. It will choose the shutter speed for you, and you can choose how large or small you want the aperture for the desired effect. (Larger aperture = smaller f/stop = less depth of field = that blurred portrait effect) You will also be able to use Adobe RGB.


    edit: After reading the above, if the shutter is taking "ages" to close, yeah, your shutter speed is too slow and that's resulting in the blurring/ghosting. You need a tripod, or you need to learn how to use the creative modes so you can use a higher ISO and larger aperture to use a faster shutter speed for less blur. :)
     
  9. Kardashian thread starter macrumors 68020

    Kardashian

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    #9
    How do I know what to look for?

    I'm a total n00b to all this, sorry!
     
  10. Kardashian thread starter macrumors 68020

    Kardashian

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    #10
    Any tips would be appreciated :)

    To ask a silly question, but for sport mode.. why would the shutter be set to close to slowly? Shouldn't it close fast so it can capture many images, as often in sports things are moving quite rapidly? Or am I totally off the rails, here? How would a tripod help this?

    Also, there isn't a filter on the lens. Thanks for the help!
     
  11. extraextra macrumors 68000

    extraextra

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    #11
    Assuming it's the same on a Digital Rebel and a DR XT, find the picture in the camera, and on the right there should be a button that says, "info." Click on it, and a box should appear in the lower left that says something like, "1/600 2.8" or whatever your numbers are. The first number is the shutter speed, the second number is the f/stop.
     
  12. bearbo macrumors 68000

    bearbo

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    #12
    after you take a shot, you can view it on your camera right, and in there they should give you a bunch of info... (i'm not sure how digital rebel format those info) but it should look something like 1/6 or 1/10 or 1/30 or 1/200 or 1/1000 or any number in between, that's the shutter speed, and the unit is second

    there's also aperture, it looks like f/2.8 or f/3.5 or f/22 or anywhere in between or something similar to that

    if shutter speed is too high, like 1/10 or 1/6 or even higher, that might cause blur...
     
  13. extraextra macrumors 68000

    extraextra

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    #13
    It's an AUTO mode, so it will set the highest shutter speed POSSIBLE to still have a properly exposed image! If it's not properly lit where you're shooting, the shutter speed slows down. Otherwise all your images will be black.

    A tripod helps, because it will stabilize the camera and the images won't be blurry due to you shaking.

    So you have some options:
    1) Buy a faster lens (f/2.8 or wider)
    2) Learn to use the creative modes
    3) Use the flash

    I'm guessing in sport mode, it also uses a smaller aperture! So smaller aperture = less light = slower shutter speed.

    I would suggest trying options 1 or 2. Have you read the manual that came with your camera? It will help with these small things, and I would recommend checking out the book, "Understanding Exposure," by Brian something-or-other. This will help you. :)
     
  14. sjl macrumors 6502

    sjl

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    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #14
    That's camera shake. The key is "takes ages" - if it's taking so long that you can count between the shutter opening and closing, the shutter speed is slow enough that camera shake is a problem.

    As others have said, just use the Av setting to control the depth of field, and have the shutter speed set automatically. Or use the Tv setting to control the shutter speed, and have the aperture set automatically. Worst case, you may need to bump up the ISO (sorry - I know how to do it on my 20D, but I'm not familiar with the Rebel. Read the manual.)
     
  15. Kardashian thread starter macrumors 68020

    Kardashian

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    #15
    Thanks everyone.

    Taken everything on board and I'll try it tomorrow, and sorry for being so slow! :p
     
  16. Jay42 macrumors 65816

    Jay42

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2005
    #16
    When reviewing a photo on the rebel xt, pressing the info button once or twice will display information about the picture including the shutter speed and aperture settings.

    I don't mean to be condescending, but it sounds like your just starting out with SLR photography. It's ok, everyone must learn somehow. Are you pressing the shutter button half-way down before actually snapping the picture? This is how you auto-focus on your subject. Make sure your subject (probably a model in your case) is over one of the 7 boxes in the viewfinder, press half way, wait for the beep, press all the way to snap the pic.

    Honestly, I would recommend reading the manual :eek: to get the most out of your Rebel. Its a powerful tool if you know how to use it. If you want to quickly bump up your shutter speed to reduce blur, switch to Av mode, and dial down (well up) the aperture setting (on back b/w screen) to the lowest possible number.

    For ghosting, try a lens hood?

    [​IMG]

    EDIT: Sport mode uses a smaller aperture? For more DOF? I've never tried it but I expected it to be wide open.
     
  17. timnosenzo macrumors 6502a

    timnosenzo

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    Jun 21, 2004
    Location:
    ct, us
    #17
    Both of your questions (and undoubtedly many others) are addressed in your users manual. You should really take a few hours, read it, try stuff, read the manual again, try shooting for a few days, then read it again. You also may want to pick up a Magic Lantern guide for that camera. That being said:

    1.) Your shutter speed is too slow. In both the landscape and sports mode, the flash will not fire. So if you don't have enough available light, your shutter speed will be too slow.

    2.) Adobe RGB color space is not available in Basic modes, only Creative modes. For a beginner, just use sRGB.
     
  18. extraextra macrumors 68000

    extraextra

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    #18
    Well, using a lens that is f/2.8, on the Portrait mode I get it at f/2.8, landscape it goes to f/6.3 (or whatever) and on sport it goes to f/4. So it's not using the smallest aperture, but it's not shooting wide open.
     
  19. m-dogg macrumors 65816

    m-dogg

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    Location:
    Connecticut
    #19
    The flash will never go off when you are using the sport mode. So if it isn't bright enough where you are taking the picture, the camera will automatically compensate by holding the shutter open longer.

    If you are taking portraits, try the portrait mode. The flash will fire if needed so your shutter speed should stay faster.
     
  20. cube macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 10, 2004
    #20
    And you need to be close enough for the flash to illuminate the subject sufficiently.
     

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