Do consoles have screen calibration?

Discussion in 'Games' started by mkrishnan, Jan 20, 2007.

  1. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #1
    Okay, this is just a ... I'm feeling nerdy and wondering... sort of question. Do any modern consoles allow you to calibrate the screen in the way OS X does?

    It seems like this could be very important with the jump up to really sophisticated TVs and displays being used with these devices.... it came up in a discussion with a friend who uses a DLP projector as his primary "television."

    For that matter, does Vista have this feature built in? :p (It better!)
     
  2. kjr39 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2004
    #2
    Not the Wii or 360.

    However, certains games on the 360 have calibration screens that allow you to adjust your TV. Most TVs these days allow you to have a calibration per imput. PRG3 on the 360 has a calibration screen...

    And Vista, I hope I never have the opportunity to find out.
     
  3. mkrishnan thread starter Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #3
    Mmmm, true, my TV's internal "calibration" is per input. But it's not really a calibration, in that it's just settings adjustment with no process to try to adjust them to a standard.

    It'd be kind of annoying to have to calibrate each game independently, non? :(
     
  4. kjr39 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2004
    #4
    But, you wouldn't need to for each game...

    The output from a game console or DVD player is a constant. Take for example the Avia DVD used calibration of a DVD player's input. Once the TV is set to a standard, any change that you see from disk to disk would be a more true representation of what the director or the developer would wanted you to see.

    That being said, there is no reason why you could not use the Avia DVD on your 360 to calibrate it.
     
  5. mkrishnan thread starter Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #5
    Ahhh, so in the games, also, you calibrate by adjusting the TV's controls to match the game, rather than the XBOX's controls to match the TV (like the Mac does -- it's OS X and the vid card that output differently, not the screen that changes, when we calibrate).

    I guess that makes sense. I need to get an Avia DVD, actually, too....
     
  6. kjr39 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2004
    #6
    Right.

    Another way to try and explain it is hardware vs. software calibration.

    Using a Mac, you have the advantage of not only calibrating the hardware (monitor), but also the OS (software) to get the precise output you are looking for. This is was in response to the more control needed for the graphics professionals out there and the lack of precision of the output's ability to be calibrated.

    Compare that to your TV where getting the exactness of the colors are not required as the only output medium is your monitor and not a printer. So, the devices lack software calibration and the only thing you can calibrate is your hardware.
     
  7. mkrishnan thread starter Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #7
    Thanks, that makes sense. :) Thank you for the explanation! :)

    Still, as now there may be multiple devices from which you view, say, movies, on a TV (DVR, DVD, computer, XBOX, etc), it might make sense for a more standard approach, so that the movie doesn't seem subtly different depending on the choice.
     

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