Do they have PBs in the US with both Japanese and Korean type on the keyboard?

Discussion in 'Macintosh Computers' started by GeneR, Feb 14, 2003.

  1. GeneR macrumors 6502a

    GeneR

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    The land of delusions, CA.
    #1
    I was visiting a Japanese bookstore in Little Tokyo and was surprised (I really shouldn't have been) to find a Japanese Mac magazine wherein they had pictures of Japanese kanji on the keyboard along with the Roman letters.

    I noticed the Japanese keyboard was a little different from that of the English edition, but I was figuring that if they had both Japanese and Korean type on the new Aluminum PBs whether it would cost much more than what we have here, whether they might also have one with both Japanese, Korean and English type, and if not, whether there is a work-around for making a custom job.

    I studied a few foreign languages while in college (love both Korean and Japanese as languages), so having the ability to write with these sorts of keyboards would be way cool.
    Any thoughts and opinions would be very much appreciated. Thanks!

    :D
     
  2. orangefoodie macrumors member

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    #2
    WHoohoo! Someone else who's interested in both Korean AND Japanese!
    You rock :)

    The thing is, it'll prolly take a custom job to outfit the keyboard with japanese/korean keylayouts - the models sold in Japan that have Kanji on them are exclusive to Japan, as far as I know. How or where this custom job might be done, I have no idea.
    (Visit apple.co.jp to oogle over them :D)

    From personal experience, there's hardly any Mac presence in Korea (for example, apple.co.kr goes to some random store selling jackets and such). Finding any sort of Mac sold natively in Korea would make me jump up and down in happiness. Or something.

    Really, if you can bear the ugliness, and strive to be able to touch-type (or at least type without looking), little sticker doohickeys on your keys work nice, along with a good typing instructor program - then you won't really need the letters. Strictly speaking, there's no difference in the positioning of the keys between Western and East Asian, so...
    it all depends on where you want to go with it :)
     
  3. GeneR thread starter macrumors 6502a

    GeneR

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    #3
    Thanks, OrangeFoodie...

    It sounds like you're saying that there isn't such a big demand for Apple in Korea. I've never been there so, I'm guessing by what you said that PCs rule there.

    I guess the idea of little doohickey stickers would be fine. I'd love to be able to use a powerbook to deal with Asia in the future (if I ever brush up on my language skills, that is)... and figure that as the internet continues to bring communities together that we need to learn more about the East and that means being able to read what's going on in Japanese, Korean, Chinese -- just to be competitive with them (and inspired by them as well!)

    If Apple is going to create world class notebooks, I would think that catering to this international business point of view would become an increasingly more important part of their strategy. Right now it doesn't seem to be. None of the other PC makers seems to realize this either. But as more people strive to bump up their educational skills simply to remain marketable in this economy, I would think this would eventually change.

    I was talking with a Professor from USC's business school the other day and he was telling me that there is now a disproportionate number of international students in the graduate school -- most are bilingual and most will be competing for the same jobs as mono-lingual Americans (many of us) in the United States. That alone, I would think, would be a good reason to start taking notice of these facts.

    Hopefully, if there is Japanese and Korean programs for the OSX then I will be able to learn how to type in both languages and to be able to network abroad with those countries as well. from the entertainment point of view, I know that a lot of great films are still being made in Japan, and now in Vietnam and Korea. The Korean film industry is really making some impressive strides right now, so, who knows?

    Thanks! Hopefully, a custom job won't be such a big deal. I'll go check out those websites you gave me. Thanks again!

    :D
     
  4. Rajj macrumors 6502a

    Rajj

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    #4
    You know that Jaguar supports Japanese and Korean fonts, so you really don’t need the keyboard!!!
     
  5. panyoshiba macrumors newbie

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    Feb 15, 2003
    #6
    English Keyboard works just fine!

    I use my Mac OS X in Japanese with English keyboard. In "International" System Preferences, you can switch languages or add additonal language input method while you stay in English system.
    Then you will have input method for each language on Menu Bar (Kotoeri in Japanese) then you just phonetically type words in Roman (like konnichiwa or arigatou). They should show up in whatever the language you chose.
    The useful shortcut to switch around two languages is to press command + space.

    In fact I like English keyboard better than Japanese because I'm so use to English keyboard and I can type so much faster on this than Japanese one and I know many Japanese prefer to type in Roman than in direct Japanese.
     
  6. Rajj macrumors 6502a

    Rajj

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  7. orangefoodie macrumors member

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    #8
    *bows*
    I stand humbly corrected, and will promptly jump up and down in happiness. :D However, upon closer inspection of the Apple Korea site, one can see that nearly everything is directly copied from the US site, including the alt tags... :rolleyes:

    I'm not quite sure if the keyboards are native Korean/English mixed, tho I imagine so...
    And yes, all the keyboard input methods are embedded within Jaguar (as opposed to Windoze where you have to download a seperate IME packet) - including different input options for both Japanese and Korean. Japanese has english transliteration, hiragana, katakana, half-width versions of these; the Korean IME is rather muddled, but has both 2-byulsik and 3-byulsik keyboard layouts. Now, getting everything to jive together in terms of character encoding is a different matter, thanks to some programs that *cough OfficeX* don't support Unicode worth squat.
     
  8. GeneR thread starter macrumors 6502a

    GeneR

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    #9
    Wow. Now's a good time to put my foot in my mouth. Thanks!

    Gee. What's that expression: "Better to remain quiet and let people think you're a fool, than to open it and to remove all doubt?"

    Ah! Yes. I do feel that ring of truth here. How silly/stupid of me. Apple's way ahead of the curve (as to be expected). I guess learning how to type within Roman letters is the next real step then for Japanese. I'm just wondering how it is for Korean...

    Hmmm...
     
  9. orangefoodie macrumors member

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    #10
    Unfortunately, the Korean IME on Jaguar only supports inputting via character-components (for lack of a better translation-word, since I wasn't taught this in English) - there are two layouts, 2byulsik and 3byulsik.

    3byulsik treats the starting consonant and the ending consonant as different keys - my mum swears by it, claiming her typing speed is happily fast. I can't stand it (mostly cos I haven't learned it).

    2byulsik, on the other hand, treats consonants as consonants and vowels as vowels, each unit assigned one key (I look at this right now and I'm doing a terrible job of explaining this...)

    Considering that there's a ridiculous amount of controversy (and justly so) regarding the Romanization of Korean, there prolly won't be any sort of English-Korean transliteration like we have in Japanese...
     
  10. GeneR thread starter macrumors 6502a

    GeneR

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    #11
    Hmmm... Good to know...

    Thanks Orangefoodie, I guess Korean would be a little more difficult to Romanize via computer keyboard. Oh, well... But hey, if they can do it for Japanese, at least one of the learning curves are a bit smaller than the other.

    Thanks again...

    :D
     
  11. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

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    #12
    Re: Wow. Now's a good time to put my foot in my mouth. Thanks!

    From what I've heard from people elsewhere, Apple's method is so old and bad. I used Kotoeri in Japan at Univ. of Kobe in 1985 so I'd say it's tried and true. I find it easy enough to enter Japanese using Hepburn transliteration.

    I've been able to use the Korean input method gauge my understanding of Korean, but it's so dependent on placement of things. Some things go so smoothly and others, well...it's time to go back to Japanese. :D
     
  12. kansaigaijin macrumors 6502

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    the great ether
    #13
    Apple ‚©‚í‚¢I

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    a load of unko but maybe you get the idea. My wife and I share an original imac, it has the j-keyboard, roman and hiragana on the keyboard, and the layout is a little different. @ is next to P, for example.

    ㅐ거ㅏㅪㅂ[ㅈ다래라ㅓ러허ㅓㅓㅕㅕ쇼ㅓㅍㅈㅍㄴㅇ
    ㅏㅑㄱ더ㅑㅏㅐㅜㅕㅇㄷㄱㄴ메ㅐㅡㅑㅜㅐㅑㅓ
     

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