Do you notice adverts?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Lau, Nov 19, 2005.

  1. Lau Guest

    #1
    I thought this article was interesting. I have always wondered whether adverts are that effective, because I don't notice them on webpages (sorry, Arn! :eek:) and don't think I pay much attention to them when out and about.

    As a designer, I think I do notice what I think are 'good' adverts, but often can't remember what brand (sometimes even what product) they're for, especially for cars, washing powder and other things that advertising is saturated with.

     
  2. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2004
    #2
    I think the majority of advertising works much more on a subliminal level, brand-building so that when the time comes for that purchasing choice, your decision is swayed by unrealised feelings towards the product or service rather than a concious and logical train of thought.

    And therefore, so much 'good' advertising is too overt and its techniques too overbearing leaving the underlying message often blurred and failing to leave an impression.
     
  3. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Location:
    Location Location Location
    #3
    I believe something similar, except I believe the effect is simply caused by repetition. Repeatedly showing you the logo may not translate into you remembering what product the TV commercial was trying to sell, but when you're in the store, and you see that familiar logo on the shelf, you will look at that product first and possibly walk out with it.
     
  4. Kobushi macrumors 6502a

    Kobushi

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2005
    Location:
    Right behind you.
    #4
    Somtimes adverts have the reverse effect on me. I occasionally find myself consciously avoiding a product due to dumb ads, or overly repiticious ones.
     
  5. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2002
    Location:
    London, England
    #5
    I think Blue is on the right track. I remember watching one of Derren Browns shows. By taking a specific route in a cab to the studio, passing many pre-planned 'subliminal' messages (images basically) he was able to predict (or rather force) how these people brains would be thinking when they got to the studio to perform the task, and so predict the out come of the task. Very strange how the mind works. Bombard it with enough crap and regardless of if we realise it or not, if will influence us :eek:
     
  6. iGav macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2002
    #6
    And that's exactly how the music industry works.

    Regarding advertising, as Michael Horsham says, "Once something's reached advertising it's reached its lowest point." ;)
     
  7. Peterkro macrumors 68020

    Peterkro

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2004
    Location:
    Communard de Londres
    #7
    Ads have the same effect on me if its heavily advertised especially on TV I won't buy it.The thing about ads is they work for stuff that is essentially the same(washing powders,cars,petrol et al) it doesn't really work for innovative stuff as word of mouth is a much more powerful medium.Methinks Apple understand that but few other companies do.
     
  8. thequicksilver macrumors 6502a

    thequicksilver

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2004
    Location:
    Birmingham
    #8
    That's my view too. I consciously avoid certain companies/goods if their adverts have annoyed me. Good adverts I'll generally think "Wow, that's a good advert", but it won't change my opinion of the product.

    Case in point - iPod shuffle: best iPod advert there's ever been, worst iPod ever. :)
     
  9. devilot Moderator emeritus

    devilot

    Joined:
    May 1, 2005
    #9
    Jingles. They get to me. Big time.

    "I'm lovin' it!"

    "Zoom zoom zoom!"

    "Double A, beep beep, M-C-O."

    "Trust the Midas touch."

    :eek: :eek:
     
  10. Lacero macrumors 604

    Lacero

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2005
    #10
    iPod nano: worst iPod advert, but the best iPod ever, with exception of the scratches.

    Your paradigm holds true.
     

Share This Page