Does anybody stand for the first color/ honor guard in a parade any more?

Discussion in 'Community' started by Eniregnat, Jul 4, 2003.

  1. Eniregnat macrumors 68000

    Eniregnat

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    #1
    Does anybody stand for the first color/ honor guard in a parade any more?
    My parent brought me up to stand, preferably with my hand over my heart, when the first color/ honor guard passes. I didn’t see anybody make an effort to stand for the flag when it passed by them during today’s parade.

    Anybody chime in from any country. I am just curious what is proper protocol, or what people generaly do.
     
  2. wdlove macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    #2
    It is proper to stand and hold your hand over your heart for the American Flag. If in the military to salute. Sadly these traditions are dying out the the World War II generation, "The Greatest Generation." Seeing the American Flag always gives me a great deal of pride and often brings me to tears. I'm a very sensative type of person. I feel so humbled to have served this great nation, may she live on!
     
  3. iJon macrumors 604

    iJon

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    #3
    yes i learn to do it more often as well. We did this alot when I was at boy's state because it is a very patriotic time and even if you dont like it you do it.

    iJon
     
  4. pEZ macrumors 6502

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    #4
    My family has always just stood and clapped when seeing it in a parade.
     
  5. Frohickey macrumors 6502a

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    #5
    I wish I had saved this picture that I saw.

    It was of a veteran and a group of people watching a parade. The colors, carried by the colorguard is shown in the background. Everyone else is sitting on the sidewalk. The veteran is the only one standing, and you clearly see the wheelchair the veteran goes around in behind him.

    Found it... caption reads "The only person standing...is the one in a wheelchair."
     
  6. rainman::|:| macrumors 603

    rainman::|:|

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    #6
    Once upon a time it was something special that made people take note, and back then I stood for the flag presentation. But today I see a flag two dozen times before I even hit the office door in the morning... Then a dozen more inside. It's lost it's meaning thanks to a population eager to pretend they care about the country that we're allegedly defending and praising.

    :)

    short answer, no.

    pnw
     
  7. Eniregnat thread starter macrumors 68000

    Eniregnat

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    #7
    Thanks for the responses.

    I was just wondering what others thought.

    Frohickey-I love that caption.

    It again seems that we are in a time where people bellow, America- Love it or leave it. I may not agree with the current political trends, but I do believe that I can make a difference, and I respect the ideals that allow me to make such changes.
     
  8. Frohickey macrumors 6502a

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    #8
    So far, all of the functions that I have attended with a colorguard, the organization holding it informs everyone to stand. The last one I remember was at a NRA banquet. :eek:

    I just hope that if I ever get into the situation where there is a colorguard, and that I'm not informed, that I will do the proper thing and stand for the colors.

    As to flags on people's car windows, car antennas, garage flag pole, etc. I don't think I need to be standing for those.
     
  9. scem0 macrumors 604

    scem0

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    #9
    I can't say I do, but I feel that there are greater ways to show pride in your nation than to stand up for the color guard in a parade.

    scem0
     
  10. Groovsonic macrumors regular

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    #10
    Of course there are, but it is still a sign of respect to those that have fought and died for you to have the freedom that you (and I) enjoy. It is a good thing to do.

    Ok. Here I go on my soapbox. This is not aimed at you scem0...


    I am 21, and it seems to me over the last 10 years (although I know it has been happening over a much longer time), people don't seem to like to show much respect for anything anymore. One example is how people dress when they go to church. When I was little, it seemed like men mostly went to church in suits. Now, if you see someone in a suit, you might assume they are an usher or a pastor. I know that it really isn't important how you dress, but to me, it says something about respect. If you really are going in God's house, shouldn't you look your best? I don't even have a suit that fits me anymore, so I guess I shouldn't be talking...
    Ok, I went way off topic. It just seems like no one has much respect for anything anymore.

    But I could be wrong...
     
  11. BaghdadBob macrumors 6502a

    BaghdadBob

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    #11
    Well, I don't even remember if the colorguard at my HS had a flag, but I'm pretty serious about giving attention and silence to the flag during the national anthem. To the point of letting people know who are consistently just jabbering nearby.

    Usually girls in my experience (hey, I'm talking about in HS people, don't trip out on some PC crap)...the kind of girls who come to the game knowing nothing about football, paying no attention to the game, and only looking for guys. What a waste of a good football game!

    Oh, yeah, and how disrespectful....

    I agree with paulwhannel a good deal, sadly it is true that many are willing to yield a flag who don't really give a crap. Oh, and from what I understand, the old veterans do not like pieces of clothing that are flag-looking.


    As far as respecting the flag at a sporting event, well, I think it shows some recognition of the fact that there are a limited number of countries in this world where you can show up at your high school's staduim and watch a hundred kids with health insurance collide with each other in a thousand dollars worth of equipment apiece.
     
  12. rainman::|:| macrumors 603

    rainman::|:|

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    #12
    Not necessarily. Not go take this too political, but I know vets that refuse to honor the flag today because they think it would be disrespectful to the country they loved and served, to honor what the country has become today.

    Remember, patriotism does not equal blindly agreeing with your country and president:

    "Dissent is the highest form of patriotism" - Thomas Jefferson

    So basically my thought is that if one believes that what's going on lately is wrong in any sense, that displaying or honoring the flag in most popular fashons is actually unpatriotic. However if a person agrees with current events and actions by our government, it is indeed patriotic to honor the flag. Patriotism is what we owe to ourselves, not what we owe to the USA.

    It's all in how you look at things... Most people would say that I hate america for my opinions on current events, but I believe myself to be extremely patriotic...

    hopefully this wasn't flamebait...

    pnw
     
  13. Ugg macrumors 68000

    Ugg

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    #13
    Of that hundred probably only about 50 have health insurance. The number is 70% for the general population but substantially lower for anyone under the age of 18. The $1000 of equipment says more about the nature of AMERICAN football than it says about anything else. The insane expense of American football is also what is bringing about its demise in high schools.

    True football is a much more democratic sport in that it doesn't require massive investments of capital. If the measure of a sport is how much it costs to play it then, the US is in a very sorry state.

    It is interesting to note that color guard and flag use was not prevalent until after WWII. Until then nobody felt that it was necessary.

    Having said all that and taken the thread way off topic, I rarely attend events where a color guard is used but when I do, I do stand.
     
  14. Groovsonic macrumors regular

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    #14


    No. It wasn't flamebait. I certianly don't think disagreeing with the current administration makes you less of a patriot. I don't agree with Jefferson, though. I don't think that dissent is the highest form of patriotism. I think service to your country in the military is the highest form of patriotism. To say that you would be willing to give your life in the defense of your country is certianly commited patriotism in action.

    If you read the political forums at all, you might know that I am a conservative in the strongest of terms, but I certianly would never say that someone who disagrees with me was unpatriotic. Thats crazy talk. The beauty of America is that people can co-exist and tolerate other peoples opinions, or as South Park put it "have your cake and eat it too".

    That said, I don't think not standing for the flag is good. The flag represents America. It represents what this country stands for..."Life, Liberty, and the persuit of happiness". It represents the blood of thousands of Americans who died for freedom. It represents the immigrants who came here to build a better life for them and their children. It represents so many honorable and great things, it seems shortsighted to not stand in respect, even if you don't agree with what is going on at the moment. I know it shouldn't be "America, love it or leave it", but it also shouldn't be "America, love it only if you agree with everthing that is happening in its government at the current time".

    Stand in respect of what the flag represents.
     
  15. Groovsonic macrumors regular

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    #15
    American Football is True football. What about it is false? In Austrailia, Football refers to a game very much like rugby. Is that not "True" football? In Canada, their Football is a modified version of our football. Is That "true" football? You call soccer Football. I don't care that you call it Football. In America, it is called soccer.

    The US, by the way, is not in a very sorry state. You don't really need all of those pads and helmets and things to play Football. You just have to play touch Football. Besides, we have other big sports in the USA. Baseball, Hockey, and Basketball. LaCrosse is becoming more popular, as is Rugby.

    By the way, you don't usually see riots erupt after Football games... seems to happen all the time after soccer... What does THAT say?

    Hockey requires equipment. Is that a "sorry" game? Gosh, you need a whole ice-skating rink to play that!



    I think, just to piss the rest of the world off, we should start calling Basketball "Americaball". And Baseball "USAball".

    And call hockey "George Bush".

    That would be fun...

    Never mind.
     
  16. wdlove macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    #16
    From a young person's point of view, what you say is a good way to show pride in our nation?
     
  17. BaghdadBob macrumors 6502a

    BaghdadBob

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    #17
    lol :D

    And, BTW, every kid playing football has insurance covering hime while he's playing...oh, and most countries can't afford to play it, that's my point. That we should be grateful to live in a place that is, among other things, affluent. That is not a chief virtue, but if we are not grateful for it, then we have no perspective.

    And football is the ultimate democratic sport. The NFL is the rags-to-riches story played over a thousand times. Have you ever looked at a cross section of the NFL? It's beautiful, you have people from every background and every body type playing there, not just a bunch of over-glorified cross-country atheletes.

    And if European futbol is so superior you all should stop:

    Watching the Superbowl (which is generally far less than the best game of the year anyway),

    Attending NFLE games,

    And sending your soccer players over here to kick our extra points and field goals.

    Oh, and everyone who holds the "men play football, intelligent men play soccer":

    Have you ever tried to play organized football? Go play captain of the defense sometime and get back to me.
     
  18. job macrumors 68040

    job

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    #18
    hahahaha...

    That's the funniest thing I've seen in a very long time. :D
     
  19. Ugg macrumors 68000

    Ugg

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    #19
    Ah, so only the American viewpoint is important?!?! I never implied that it was a black and white proposition. American Football, Australian rules football, rugby all have their roots in football. I think it is fair to say that it is the true football or at least the origin thereof.

    That is true, but touch football isn't what BB was referring to.

    Cycling also requires a great deal of expensive equipment as do many other sports, cycling is therefore reserved for those who can pay. My point was that sports that require a great deal of money in order to participate in them aren't by nature democratic.

    Hmm, why do you need an ice skating rink to play hockey? Where I grew up all that was needed was a stick, some skates, a puck and a frozen pond. Or course, Hockey would then only be freely available to those who live where it gets cold in the winter. It is more of a regional sport than football is and not by definition exclusive.

    How would you pissoff the rest of the world by doing that? and why would you want to do it in the first place?

    Why name a Canadian sport after an American president?
     
  20. job macrumors 68040

    job

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    #20
    How can a sport be 'democratic?' By definition, a sport cannot be democratic.

    I think you mean something along the lines of 'egalitarian'
     
  21. BaghdadBob macrumors 6502a

    BaghdadBob

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    #21
    Cycling, like golf, is unlike football because you don't have to buy your own equipment in football. Thus my point, to be grateful to live in a country where that kind of highly expensive sport can be supported by the community.

    That's why I hate golf, it's a rich boy's sport.
     
  22. job macrumors 68040

    job

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    #22
    Right, but in the football programs at most public high schools, your pads and equipment are usually provided for you, unless you opt to purchase your own. The players do have the choice. Thus the attempt to make American football seem like a elitist, exclusive rich man's sport is futile.
     
  23. Groovsonic macrumors regular

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    #23
    I wouldn't want to do that. But I get/got the distinct impression that you were bashing an American game. (and Americas healthcare system, and americas economic system, and americas public school system, but hey, I may be reading WAY too much into your statement...) Soccer is in no way a "better" game.
    Is it only the Non-American viewpoint that matters?

    Why would I want to name a Canadian sport after an 2 disliked American presidents? Because it would be really funny!
     
  24. Groovsonic macrumors regular

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    #24
    I just don't like it cause it is SOOOO boring.

    Besides, Mini-Golf is where its at!!!
     

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