Does anyone know the MHz rating of the Xserve RAID?

Discussion in 'Mac Help/Tips' started by G5orbust, Feb 12, 2003.

  1. G5orbust macrumors 65816

    G5orbust

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    #1
    Can anyone tell me the answer to that? It is nowhere on the Apple company website and I was intrigued about the fact that the MHz rating is not disclosed. Does that mean that, infact, the Xserve RAId is not made to be a stand alone machine, but instead as a file holder for a regular xserve to attatch to, in effect more than triple the file capacity?

    Any help would be greatly appreaciated.
     
  2. awulf macrumors 6502

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    #2
    Here you go:

    http://www.apple.com/r/store/pdf/XserveRAID.pdf

    So it doesn't use a 68000 8MHz :D
     
  3. G5orbust thread starter macrumors 65816

    G5orbust

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    #3
    yes yes but that is the xserve. I desire to know what drives the xserve RAID, because it has to have some kind of a processor and RAM.
     
  4. awulf macrumors 6502

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    #4
    Oh, wait, Thats for the normal Xserve.

    Maybe the Xserve RAID requires a normal Xserve to run it.
     
  5. G5orbust thread starter macrumors 65816

    G5orbust

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    #5
    well if thats true, thats crap, cuz they don't tell you that straight out...
     
  6. amnesiac1984 macrumors 6502a

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    #6
    well if somebody was selling a firewire hard disk would you expect them to say in big letters. YOU NEED A COMPUTER TO RUN THIS. No? Thats because the Xserver Raid is a set of hard disks as raid, a RAID is a storage peripheral for a computer! Xserve Raid is a storage solution for the Xserve computer.
     
  7. awulf macrumors 6502

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    #7
    That is one hell of an expensive external Hard drive solution.
     
  8. DannyZR2 macrumors 6502

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  9. Nermal Moderator

    Nermal

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    #9
    It's an array of drives, that's really all it is. So yes, you do need a normal Xserve to use it (connects over the fibre channel I think).
     
  10. britboy macrumors 68030

    britboy

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    #10

    Why not try finding a cheaper solution for 2.5TB of hot-swappable hard drives? The type of customer who are going to go for the Xserve are likely to need lots of hard drive space, either for movie projects, web pages, or anything else that they're using it for. It's companies that are most likely to be in the market for these machines, and they can afford to pay more than private individuals.

    All the Xserve RAID is is a a hard drive bay, to expand the hard disk space available in the Xserve itself. If you like, you could consider it to be an add-on feature.
     
  11. Bear macrumors G3

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    #11
    Xserve RAID is indeed just a disk subsystem. You need a computer to attach it to. Apple supports the Xerve RAID on both the Xserve and PowerMAC G4.

    The speed of the actual processors is not a big deal, what is more important is how many IOPS it can handle as well as the Megabytes per second throughput.

    Apple has priced this RAID box at the low end of the spectrum, making it very competative pricewise.
     
  12. blogo macrumors 6502

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    #12
    That's because people buying them know what they are doing.
     
  13. geeman macrumors regular

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    #13
    Don't let me down here people...

    1) A RAID is NOT just a disk subsystem.
    2) It's not "one big mutha of a hard drive"

    It's not like sticking a big bunch of disks on the end of your Firewire bus, my friend. If it was, it would be a LOT cheaper and you'd be thinking of suicide when a disk blew up and you lost all of your data.

    RAID is chosen for:

    -- Speed (you can get 400MB per second transfer speed off some RAIDs!!)
    -- Storage capacity (obviously)
    -- Less nearline or offline data requirements (tape drives, jukeboxes, DVDs, etc.)
    -- Probably a load of other reasons that I don't know about :p

    A RAID isn't just a dumb load of disks. It has one or more controllers that manage the RAID subsystem independently from the server, presenting the disks (in whatever config) as a single "disk" (or more rightly, "volume") per RAID array.

    OS X has software RAID built-in to the OS, but no-one with half a brain would EVER touch a software RAID solution - it's just not reliable enough. They also take up system memory, and eat clock cycles. Being in competition with whatever apps are on the box in the first place, software-based RAIDs run dog-slow compared to hardware-based ones.

    Hardware-based RAIDs are true multi-tasking machines that do not occupy any host system memory and are not OS dependent. But the main reason that they're better is that hardware RAIDs are highly fault-tolerant. If you're putting all your data in one place, it better NEVER fall over....

    The question is: what sort of controllers are they using? Clock speed is almost irrelevant, as the Controller is built as a "hardware array" that doesn't HAVE any software to run on it.

    XRAID attaches to a SERVER (XServe, of course). All the other machines access the data off this main server via networks (Ethernet, Gigabit, SAN, whatever).

    That's how it works. Hope I've helped.

    BTW, just to confuse everyone a bit more, a disk storage repository without a dedicated RAID controller is called a JBOD ("Just A Bunch Of Disks")


    :D
     
  14. Rower_CPU Moderator emeritus

    Rower_CPU

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    #14
    And, as stated above, a PowerMac G4 Server:

    http://www.apple.com/xserve/raid/deployment.html (bottom right of page)

    And you forgot about redundancy in your list of RAID attributes. One of the key reasons to go with a RAID solution on a server is that a mirrored array will allow you to keep running if one of your drives dies.
     
  15. amnesiac1984 macrumors 6502a

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    #15
    Thanks for telling me how a raid works, although I already knew. I'm not sure if you were referring to me or the guy who posted this thread, but why i said what i did was to make it clear that Xserve RAID is not an Xserve with more hard drive space, but a RAID system for the Xserve, so you need an xserve (or G4) to go with it! I think the guy thought that the RAID was a computer and wanted to know how fast it was!
     
  16. geeman macrumors regular

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    #16
    Redundancy is certainly one reason why you would use a RAID (thanks for mentioning it). But redundancy is not necessarily a RAID attribute.

    If you're using a software RAID controller, there's no (system) redundancy.

    If you're running RAID 0, there's no (data) redundancy.

    And as for using a G4 server as the RAID host? Ha-ha! What next - running Ferraris on Diesel? Come on! Anyone who thinks that the G4 Server is anything more than a glorified desktop machine is obviously sitting within the parameters of the Steve Marketing Distortion Field.

    It's one of the reasons why Apple have a tough time breaking into the Server marketplace (apart from currently having CPUs as fast as molasses): they've had zero reputation up to now.


    :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D
     
  17. Rower_CPU Moderator emeritus

    Rower_CPU

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    #17
    Similarly, speed is not a given when using a RAID solution. RAID 1 can even slow down a system slightly when writing data, as some extra overhead is required to split the data as it flows to the array.

    My point wasn't to argue with you, just to fill in some gaps you left in your description (which was quite good, by the way).

    Likewise, I wasn't suggesting that the PowerMac G4 be used in place of an Xserve, just that it's an Apple supported option.

    :D
     
  18. geeman macrumors regular

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  19. G5orbust thread starter macrumors 65816

    G5orbust

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    #19
    wow.... How much info I just got over the past 24 hours

    So I got that it needed an xserve to run properly and the inof travels over fibre wire.


    Thanks for all your help.
     
  20. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

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    May 19, 2002
    #20
    If the warranty issue bothers you, there are still some ATA drives that have the 3 yr warranty and high MTBF numbers -- even Maxtor who led the charge for shorter warranties still offers drives aim at these mass storage solutions.

    Of course that means that people need to think ahead for failure, because you cannot walk down to CompUSA and pick up a new one.
     

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