Does your employer/company restrict the OS privilege by not granting you Admi?

Discussion in 'Community' started by YS2003, Sep 24, 2005.

  1. YS2003 macrumors 68020

    YS2003

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2004
    Location:
    Finally I have arrived.....
    #1
    My company started implementing a company-wide program to restrict the OS privileges for each individual employee. My company PC crashed and IT did the re-intall after the hard ware was repaired and I immediately noticed I could not adjust the time, add/remove programs, run disk check/defrag, nor change the engergy saver setting among others on Windows XP based computers.

    First, I got annoyed of this new policy. But, an IT tech guy told me the company's IT dept needs to do this to prevent newbie computer users from installing spy wares, malware screen saver programs, and bootleged software. So, this is the easiest way to manage those not-so-tech-savvy employees by setting up the policy to the level where the lowest common denominators are.

    Even though I am not an expert on tech issues, I have known many issues through my 3 Macs, 2 Windows, and 1 Linux. Some of colleagues come to me for computer related issues when IT was not available. I could not believe what other employees at my company were installing on the company computers when this tech guy told me some stories.

    Now that I don't have an administrator privilege on this PC, I am very wary of what's in it. When I pluged this into my Belkin hub, my hub system software showed 2 different computer names on this PC. I think I am going to put this PC in DMC areas of my home network.

    I am curious to know if other forum members' employers/companies (your own companies, for that matter, if you are an owner) are doing. I am not in the banking nor in military industries where high securities are paramount.
     
  2. w_parietti22 macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2005
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    #2
    My dads company PC has no admin privledges. I sucks cause I'm the admin of our home network and I've the internets down on his PC... I can't do like anything setting wise. He can't install iTunes. (which we wants cause we have an Airport Express) He can't install any tax programs or anything. It just makes me hate that stupid PC even more! :(
     
  3. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2004
    #3
    My employer's do this, or rather the IT team does — I think it's fairly common.

    I couldn't care less, to be honest because my main work machine is a PMG5 which isn't under their domain — it's under mine. :)

    However, I do use my Win2000 PC for downloading software updaters for Mac apps (the Macs aren't hooked up to the web). About a year ago, they tried blocking all incoming JPG attachments :confused: which made life problematic for me and my other designer colleagues — this didn't last long once we kicked up a fuss.

    They don't block any domains as far as I know, so the occasional post here during working hours has been known to happen. ;)

    To get an FTP client on the PC, I had to ask IT. No probs... I'm glad I'm not responsible for the upkeep of my Dell.
     
  4. Josh macrumors 68000

    Josh

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2004
    Location:
    State College, PA
    #4
    My office does this as well - they restict admin priv.'s so no one can do very much.

    BUT...I am in pretty good with the IT guys, so they give me admin access, because they know I use a lot of apps that the others in the office do not. I need to install/uninstall things all the time and have full access to the machine.

    Bad thing about it is, because I talk to them so much, and do a lot of the fixing on my own, a lot of people in the office come to me rather than IT with their problems....being polite, I do it...but I cannot tell you how mad it makes me. I am NOT a PC repair specialist - we have a person in our office whose job it is to do that stuff. That person doesn't design my web sites, so why am I fixing their pc's?

    Really, I think I'm going to stop doing that, and politely yet absolutely, refer them to the IT person ;)
     
  5. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2002
    Location:
    London, England
    #5
    Yes, but I'm one of the bastards that do it to you :p :D

    Users as admins for the most part is dangerous, they manage to **** up their machines quite well enough without it.

    Sincerely,

    edesignuk
    2nd Line Desktop Support

    :eek:
     
  6. katie ta achoo macrumors G3

    Joined:
    May 2, 2005
    #6
    At school, I don't have Admin privileges, of course. If students did, they'd all be installing AIM and Yahoo Messenger and other crap. (OMG!1 AND OSAMA BEN LADEN SCRE3NS4V3r?! *download* 0MG11!! V1RUS3S!)

    But, argghh... I can't even use a THUMB DRIVE. Blarf! I can't even just plug my shuffle in and get power off of it, to charge it during class.

    ..but it's for the better-- I have admin privileges on other computers in that school... :p
     
  7. eva01 macrumors 601

    eva01

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2005
    Location:
    Gah! Plymouth
    #7
    at the lab in the hospital only two computers have full access the rest you can't do anything really
     
  8. tdhurst macrumors 68040

    tdhurst

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #8
    So what?

    So, what you're saying is that your dad's company is preventing you from using his WORK laptop (which is not owned by him) for your own personal use.

    If your dad had a company car, should he let you drive it? Or install a different CD player in it?

    Of course not and the are exactly the same type of issue. Company laptops are owned by the business and, as such, they are completely in the right to restrict personal use.

    I really don't see what the issue is here...
     
  9. tdhurst macrumors 68040

    tdhurst

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #9
    yeah, and...?

    Your school won't let you plug in a toy during class? How TERRIBLE! What does having your shuffle charged have to do with class?
     
  10. eva01 macrumors 601

    eva01

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2005
    Location:
    Gah! Plymouth
    #10
    thumb drives can be pretty damn important in school DUH!!!

    Just because it is a shuffle doesn't mean it is a toy, comeon with your BS think past this "toy" and think of how else it can be used.

    I know i use my iPod to transfer school data to and from computers. Why shouldn't anyone else be able to. hell when i was in Highschool we had to use thumbdrives to transfer data from home computers to school computers.
     
  11. greatdevourer macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    #11
    Dad's company don't give them it, but that doesn't stop him and a friend wandering round giving it to anyone who asks :p
     
  12. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2002
    Location:
    London, England
    #12
    Assuming you mean your dad is the IT man, I'm sure his manager would be so pleased to hear that :rolleyes:
     
  13. OnceUGoMac macrumors 6502a

    OnceUGoMac

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2004
    #13
    Agreed.
     
  14. YS2003 thread starter macrumors 68020

    YS2003

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2004
    Location:
    Finally I have arrived.....
    #14
    is there a security hole in Windows to crack the Admi passcode?

    I am curious to know if Windows has the security hole from which you can crack the admini password. I googled a little bit; some web sites has listed some programs you donwload on the floppy, from which you boot your PC. I am not sure if that ever works. Even though Windows are full of security holes, I don't think it is that bad enough to make that type of program to work. Any comment?
     
  15. eva01 macrumors 601

    eva01

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2005
    Location:
    Gah! Plymouth
    #15
    ummm you are asking us to help you break your companies rules and break the law.

    probably not going to get help
     
  16. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2002
    Location:
    London, England
    #16
    With the right piece of software it's incredibly easy to reset the admin password to whatever you like.

    Incidentally, the same goes with Mac OS X though. Although it's actually even easier, you don't need a special piece of software, just the OS X install CD :eek: (I think)
     
  17. greatdevourer macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    #17
    They're digital security guys, but not system admins :p
     
  18. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2002
    Location:
    London, England
    #18
    Well that's just spiffy, all the same, the people that make the rules (for good reason) wouldn't be too happy.

    If you're in IT in any kind of support/administrative role, and have one ounce of sense, you don't give users local admin.
     
  19. greatdevourer macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    #19
    To extract it, yes, but it's veeery slow and doesn't always work. Just to change it so you can log in as admin (extraction is only necessery if they've encrypted their documents and you want to read them) [mod note: no].
     
  20. greatdevourer macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    #20
    They've never had any problems (spyware and stuff doesn't need you to be admin, anyway), and all people want to do is install summat such as iTunes

    EDIT: Plus, the only thing they're admin on is that computer. The drop-stuff box thing is just that, and the real network has under 50 users
     
  21. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2002
    Location:
    London, England
    #21
    Which you will find is probably against company policy for all number of (good) reasons :rolleyes:
     
  22. dotdotdot macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    #22
    My school did the stupidest thing - last year, they decided that the internet was not important. So, now only three rooms in our school have internet access. But, they keep the computers on Admin all the time, so students end up screwing everything up anyway.

    Now, instead of emailing myself a file, I need to put it on my shuffle. No problem, except when you realize that most of the computers don't have USB2 and a select few have USB 1.1.
     
  23. tdhurst macrumors 68040

    tdhurst

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #23
    Wow...

    Yeah, no need to be a dick about it.

    Agreed that thumb drives are incredibly useful, but the post I was talking about was referring to charging his shuffle, not transferring his files.

    Sadly (and this will forever be the case), IT must account for the lowest common denominator. If there is a chance that some idiot will upload a virus from thumb drive, then it's much easier to disallow all external drives.

    Oh, and by the way...I own both a full size iPod and a shuffle, both of which I use regularly for transferring info from school, to home, to work, etc.

    I know they are not toys.
     
  24. whocares macrumors 65816

    whocares

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2002
    Location:
    :noitаɔo˩
    #24
    That is if booting from optical drive hasen't been disabled... ;)
     
  25. eva01 macrumors 601

    eva01

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2005
    Location:
    Gah! Plymouth
    #25
    heh i was just going over the top for no reason really, just that both your posts in a row sounded slightly well i don't know how to put it, but not nicely so i just said what i felt like.

    Sorry there was no means to insult ^_^
     

Share This Page