Dual Core -and- Dual Processor???

Discussion in 'Macintosh Computers' started by animefx, Jul 7, 2005.

  1. animefx macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 10, 2005
    Location:
    Illinois
    #1
    Unless they are planning to release Dual Core, Dual Processor G5s, I don't really see the point of Dual Core G5s. Lower power consumption is nice for ibook, powerbook, and mac mini G5s, but Dual Processors will have more performance than Dual Core, so why not have both for the new Power Mac G5s, if they don't then isn't this a quite a step down? Especially maxing G5 out at 2.5 ghz.
     
  2. dmw007 macrumors G4

    dmw007

    Joined:
    May 26, 2005
    Location:
    Working for MI-6
    #2
    True. We want Dual 970MP CPUs in upcoming PowerMac G5s, not just one dual core G5. Ah, the power of four PowerPC G5s working for you - AWESOME!
     
  3. liquidtrance123 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2005
    Location:
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    #3
    i hope they wait a few more months before they drop them on us, kuz i just bought my dual 2gig powermac and i'll need time to come up with the money for those dual socket / dual core machines as they would be an absolute must buy :p
     
  4. MacsRgr8 macrumors 604

    MacsRgr8

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    Sep 8, 2002
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    The Netherlands
    #4
    I thought I read somewhere that Dual Cores can be more efficient in SMP instructions than Dual CPU's, as there is minimal latency in communication between the "cores" (vs two CPU's).
    OTOH, the current Dual configs of the G5 each have a FSB of their own, making it possible for the two CPU's to handle more data at a given time than a Dual Core which shares one FSB.

    :confused:

    I dunno.....

    As the MP also probably won't reach 3.0 GHz this year (as Steve obviously already knew), we still should be safe to assume that the next Dual Core PowerMac G5's will be faster than the current top model. Why else introduce them...
    Steve also will have to come up with a very fast PPC PowerMac to last until the MacTels will be available. You can be sure that BareFeats and/or xlr8yourmac will have the speed comparison tests of the PPC vs x86 Macs in no time.

    Either the Dual Cores will be faster per clock cycle than the Dual CPU's or there will be Dual Dual Cores.

    If there will be a Dual Dual Core 2.5 GHz PowerMac G5..... I'll be getting one! :cool:
    This Mac would presumably be the fastest PowerPC based Mac ever....
     
  5. Tilmitt macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2005
    #5
    Each of the cores on the 970MP has 1MB of L2 cache, as opposed to the 512KB on each 970FX cpu. I'd imagine this will help performance quite a bit. Shine on PowerPC!
     
  6. Dreadnought macrumors 68020

    Dreadnought

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    Jul 22, 2002
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    Almere, The Netherlands
    #6
    For some reason I don't think they will come in the powermacs. First of all, IBM introduced them, and it's a bit too quiet at Apple. Second, it probably takes some time to bring/develop macs with these chips. Third, it only goes to 2.5 GHZ for now, while the current powermac is at 2.7 GHZ. Apple doesn't do a step back, even if this is a faster architecture and will kick the 2.7 butt. Fourth, isn't this chip for the new playstation/Xbox? Sorry to say it, but I think we only will see an update of the current G5 processors and then the transition to intel.
     
  7. dmw007 macrumors G4

    dmw007

    Joined:
    May 26, 2005
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    Working for MI-6
    #7
    I am in the same boat- I just bought my dual 2.3GHz G5. But I'll stick with it until ~rev B of the intel equipped PowerMacs.
     
  8. MacTruck macrumors 65816

    MacTruck

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    Jan 27, 2005
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    One Endless Loop
    #8
    I think dual core dual 2.5ghz 970MP will be a very nice machine. The 2.7ghz is just an overclocked 2.5ghz anyways. Might be seeing dual core dual 2.7ghz chips anyways. IF they ever get into a powermac. Who knows. Something has to come. Jobs said he had new powerpc products in the pipeline and they can't push the 970fx any further so I bet thats the new product. But will it perform? If developers have to recompile for 4 cpus which it looks like they might it will be a pointless upgrade seeing as hoe developers are switching to intel anyways.
     
  9. solvs macrumors 603

    solvs

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    LaLaLand, CA
    #9
    No. The gaming console chips are PowerPCs, but they are NOT G5s. Big difference.

    Also factually incorrect. Since Apple and IBM are the manufacturers and overclocking means to clock a chip faster than it's been rated to run by the manufacturer, they would not be overclocking. The CPUs are rated to run at 2.7GHz, therefor they are 2.7GHz.

    Multiple CPU support is built-in to OS X.

    The Intel thing isn't happening for awhile. At least probably not for the Towers. What else are they going to use in the next PowerMac? Remember, Steve said something about still having some good PowerPC products coming out. How else is he going convince people to buy G5s until next year?

    I hope my next Mac is a "cheap" dual core G5. A single, dual 2GHz for ~$1500. Drool. :D
     
  10. ksz macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2003
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    #10
    Nah, don't get buyer's remorse over this. Save up to replace your PowerMac in 4-5 years with a new 2-CPU quad-core hyperthreaded Intel Gargantium. Remember that dual core is just the beginning; multicore is the future (i.e. N > 2).
     
  11. Dreadnought macrumors 68020

    Dreadnought

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    Jul 22, 2002
    Location:
    Almere, The Netherlands
    #11
    The 2.7 is not overclocked. Rather the 2.5 is underclocked! IBM produces a wafer with chips, tests every chip how fast it can run, and if it runs smoothly at a certain speed they say it's a 2.7, when it doesn't run smoothly they try to run it smoothly at a slower speed, 2.5 or 2.3 for instance.
     
  12. ksz macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2003
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    #12
    Not necessarily. A chip may be able to run hundreds of megahertz faster if it is cooled beyond "normal cooling". Chips are not tested to see how fast they can switch, but rather how fast they can switch within a temperature range (a specific thermal load). If you can manage that thermal load more effectively, you can get away with overclocking.
     

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