DVD-copying issues

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by pinto32, Feb 26, 2006.

  1. pinto32 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2003
    Location:
    PA
    #1
    Hey, I recently invested in an external DVD burner, but have been having some issues in copying DVDs. First, I want to note that I am only copying DVDs that are owned by members of my family for backup and so we can all have copies, since me and my brother are both away at college...nothing but fair-use stuff going on.

    Anyway, I am using Mac-The-Ripper 2.6.6 to rip, and Toast 7.02 to burn. I am using an 800mhz iBook (640MB RAM, 54GB hard drive, with ~9GB free before ripping a movie), with a Lite-On DVD burner attached via USB 2.0. I always make sure to restart (OS 10.3) before I rip/burn, and don't do anything else while ripping/burning. Despite this, I keep getting glitches in the copies. They are just split-second errors, and can vary from none to several in a movie.

    My instinct says that I probably don't have enough open space on my hard drive once I load a full DVD on there, but I haven't had a chance to test this theory.

    Any advice/comments would be a great help. Thanks in advance to some, and "seriously, I'm doing this legally" in advance to others. ;)
     
  2. ElectricSheep macrumors 6502

    ElectricSheep

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Location:
    Wilmington, DE
    #2
    i've had fairly good experiences using Dragon Burn for burning media.

    What kind of recordable media are you using? Not all DVD-Rs are created equally, and some media will record better than others. What speed are you recording at? Is the drive USB 2.0 only, or does it also have a Firewire 400 interface?
     
  3. CanadaRAM macrumors G5

    CanadaRAM

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2004
    Location:
    On the Left Coast - Victoria BC Canada
    #3
    Duplicating a commercial DVD so more than one person can use it in more than one residence (sibling or not) can't be considered fair-use backups of media. IMO.

    Backup, by any definition I have seen, is for the personal use of the individual who owns the original only.
     
  4. gnasher729 macrumors P6

    gnasher729

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2005
    #4
    Backup is fair use. Taking copies with you to college doesn't sound remotely like "fair use" to me. Do what you like, but don't kid yourself and us and claim it is "fair use".
     
  5. kwajaln macrumors 6502

    kwajaln

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2004
    Location:
    CHICAGO!
    #5
    Since when is there a "FAMILY-USE" clause in the fair-play usage agreement? It sounds to me like you're aren't "backing up" but instead are pirating and bootlegging copies of DVDs that YOU do not own. Mommy's and Daddy's DVDs aren't yours to copy, kiddo.
     
  6. maxiam macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2006
    #6
    Try burning at a slower speed.

    I find with DVD video burning that choosing maximum burn speed gives a disc that will freeze at a particular point about 20 or 30% of the time. I guess this relates to the quality of the -R media but I have also had the problem with Apple brand discs :confused:

    I agree that your stated use infringes copyright.
     
  7. jsw Moderator emeritus

    jsw

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2004
    Location:
    Andover, MA
    #7
    I'm pretty lenient about the whole "fair use" deal - I have kids, and I back up a number of their DVDs (starting after we lost a folder of 20 of them on a flight, some of which were irreplaceable due to that damned Disney "vault"). I have no issues whatsoever about making a copy and using the copy instead of the original. If the manufacturer would replace any damaged copies for a small fee (say, $2-$3), then I'd never back them up. But... to pay $15-$25 for a DVD - most of which presumably covers the license to view it, as it certainly exceeds the cost of the actual device itself - is unfair. I should not have to pay twice (or more) for the license to view. It is unimportant to me that I might be violating the law using MacTheRipper to copy DVDs. I don't see it as immoral, unethical, or anything like that, and I don't lose sleep over it.

    That said: one backup copy is all I make (and only on some DVDs), and I then put away the original. Making multiple copies for simultaneous viewing in different locations? Not fair use.

    That said, I agree - use a slower speed, and only rip the main feature so as to require less compression. On the one backup copy.
     
  8. wwooden macrumors 68000

    wwooden

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Location:
    Burlington, VT
    #8
    Most DVD's now are Dual-Layer, and most people who make "backups" of their DVD's use single layer DVD disks, they are a lot cheaper. These means you are trying to fit double the information onto one disk, there will inherently be glitches and mess-ups from the compression. Some programs let you remove features to save space and improve quality ( can remove languages, soundtracks, extra features, etc.). If you have a double layer drive and double layer disks, I bet the copies would be actually like the original.
     
  9. maxiam macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2006
    #9
    Even though most DVD palyers can be made region free, the idea that they expect us to buy new DVDs when we move to another country still gets to me. In this case, I consider removing region control and copying fair use. I have also added subtitles to DVDs and think that's fair.

    Unfortunately, I don't think the law is on my side... :mad:
     
  10. jsw Moderator emeritus

    jsw

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2004
    Location:
    Andover, MA
    #10
    Agreed. I'd accept a trade-in option with a small fee, but the whole region-locking deal is absurd. Legal, but absurd.
     
  11. maxiam macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2006
    #11
    Sure, you shrink a movie and there will be some loss of quality. Its not that noticeable unless you have high standards and a BIG TV.
    I don't think the problem is to do with compression. The compressed VOBs will play fine from the hard drive, its during the burn that the problems start.

    Lowering the speed seems to alleviate this.
     
  12. ChrisBrightwell macrumors 68020

    ChrisBrightwell

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2004
    Location:
    Huntsville, AL
    #12
    What about ripping the DVD to iTunes and carrying it to school on your iPod? Would that fall under Fair Use?

    If so, why wouldn't taking a copy of the disc?
     
  13. maxiam macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2006
    #13
    That is still use by the owner of the DVD. Pinto32 is talking about 3 copies to be used by different people in different locations: the "family", himself and his brother. A lot of people do that with CDs and DVDs but that doesn't mean its legal.
     
  14. jsw Moderator emeritus

    jsw

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2004
    Location:
    Andover, MA
    #14
    Actually, it's technically illegal, apparently, to rip any copies of DVDs. Which is ridiculous in cases like putting one on your laptop for viewing in-flight, or when putting it on your iPod. Still... it's illegal.
     
  15. ChrisBrightwell macrumors 68020

    ChrisBrightwell

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2004
    Location:
    Huntsville, AL
    #15
    Circumventing copy protection is illegal. Copying for personal use is Fair Use.

    So, to exercise your rights, you have to break the law. That's why the DMCA is broken and needs to be thrown out.
     
  16. weg macrumors 6502a

    weg

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2004
    Location:
    nj
    #16
    I totally agree. Furthermore, I think that one should be forced to buy a new DVD every time one wants to view it. Viewing videos with friends should be disallowed, too, unless everybody brings his own version. Don't you see that actors (and other people who work in the film industry) can hardly make a living nowadays, just because YOU share your Pinocchio DVD with your siblings? You %&*#!!!
     
  17. weg macrumors 6502a

    weg

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2004
    Location:
    nj
    #17
    I find it pretty interesting though, that region-locking is actually legal. If you'd do that within the European Union, e.g., region-locking your DVDs using different regions for France and Germany, and then sell it for different prices I guess you'd find yourself in front of the European court before you sold 100 copies...
     

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