Dvd Resolution Question

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by kjif, Jul 3, 2006.

  1. kjif macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2006
    #1
    I got some of mine motion graphic video in mov file in 1280*854 and plays nice and sharp, but the video quality turn awful after I exported from DVD studio, same with my menu back ground image, I had created an image in PHOTOSHOP with same resolution (72 dpi), and the lines and vector shapes didnt turn out very blury.....

    I am using DVD studio pro 3 only
    can anyone tell me how to enhance my DVD quality like how keynote presentation quality?! I know they work differnt, but the quality!!!

    many thanks!!!
     
  2. Sdashiki macrumors 68040

    Sdashiki

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2005
    Location:
    Behind the lens
    #2
    how are you exporting from DVDSP?

    You dont really "export" video from DVDSP, you import it into it and it encodes it into the approriate format if it isnt already.

    MPEG1/2 and the audio codecs and image codecs are all you can use in DVDSP


    What kind of file is the original and what exactly are you doing, this needs some clarification to help.
     
  3. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #3
    DVDs are 720*480 and very, very compressed. The photoshop image probably doesn't look as compressed because it's just a still image, but the motion gfx are just going to look like crap compared to the source files.


    Lethal
     
  4. kjif thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2006
    #4
    Thanks Lethal wolfe

    Thanks LethalWolfe

    I thought a about making a dvd recently, but I havnt make any dvd before, only had only little experience with digital video before, thanks for the reply. Just a few more question.

    if 720*480 is the maximum size for dvd.... but how come when we watch those DVD product, the image quality is way better~

    Did anyone saw the graphics made by motion 2?! I heard it is pro for vector and other graphical stuff?!
     
  5. kjif thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2006
    #5
    reply 2Sdashiki

    forgive me, by export I mean buring a DVD
    I got you now, I got my folio in mov format, which has been compressed once before,
    now I understand why my graphic quality is like trash....

    but seems DVDSP compressed a lot when encoding it?!?!
    or I am asking too much for my work?!:confused:
     
  6. realityisterror macrumors 65816

    realityisterror

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2003
    Location:
    Snellville, GA
    #6
    Your TVs resolution is a lot lower than you think. Most standard-def TVs are around 640x480 in the United States...

    If you want to export to a disc, you won't be able to use DVD and get any better quality... You'd need to export to a high-definition format in order to get any higher quality.

    Sorry if I misunderstood your post and you already said this, but have you tried the DVD you burned on a standalone DVD player? If you view it on a standard-definition TV, it shouldn't look very bad...
     
  7. kjif thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2006
    #7
    Thats right I always check it by my powerbook,:eek:
    Thanks man~
     
  8. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #8
    I assume you are referring to movies or TV shows on DVD. It's way better for a couple of reasons. First off, odds are it was shot on 35mm film and went threw a post production process that cost hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of dollars. Secondly, when it came time for the DVD a professional compressionist most likely went thru the whole film/TV show and adjusted the compression manually as needed using equipment that probably cost more than your car. ;)

    And, of course, if you saw the source material side by side w/the DVD you'd be able to see how crappy the DVD really looks (i.e. if you projected the 35mm print of Batman Begins and the DVD of Batman Begins on a theater screen side by side).


    Lethal
     
  9. worriedmac macrumors regular

    worriedmac

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2006
    #9
    Simply what format are the new hd dvd's likely to be?

    Resolutions will be various I'm sure, formats I'm interested in. I require to author dvds and just checking out the market for what is required so I don't look bad at it.
     
  10. worriedmac macrumors regular

    worriedmac

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2006
    #10
    Simply what format are the new hd dvd's likely to be?

    Actually I'm interested in the compression rate that is likely to be used? This is because the powerbook g4 at 1.5 cannot play 720p trailers perfectly. If the new formats of similar compression then what hope has my powerbook. At lower compressions I've found that hd is managable at full speed, its when the bandwidth reaches about 7000kbits/sec that problems occur.

    Another interesting fact is I've seen 1080p run at half frames rates (13 frames) on a 1.83 centrino, which makes no sense to me at all. Its a good chip but it isn't that good. to add to my puzzlement when playing within Quicktime the bandwith was in some cases registering as 1/8 on the same file in comparison to what my powerbook showed. I'm hoping this demonstates that it is inadequate software refinement that means a powerbook or any g4 cannot play but can edit HD.

    Information on blue ray and hddvd would be great, I'm getting consumed by numbers as well as p and i letters hanging on the end of various video that barely is uniform to anything.
     
  11. kineticpast macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    #11
    Sounds like your PowerBook will likely have no hope!

    Blu-ray will be capable of up to 54 Mbit/sec bandwidth, which is about double that of a normal HDTV broadcast.
     
  12. worriedmac macrumors regular

    worriedmac

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2006
    #12
    Thats the thing

    It is only apples trailers that cause a problem and that darn H.264 codec. I doubled the file size in the same file format and it played. Also though it changed the data rate to 20mbits from 10000kbits now I would have expected that the later would play better but that wasn't, so the answer lies in the H.264 codec and its increased complicity, the smaller file size it creates.

    So only at the highest of compressions with H.264 does it cause a problem to my powerbook. If the blue ray discs will be as high as 50mbits is this at high compression or low compression (which will be managable by my comp I think)?
     
  13. kineticpast macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    #13
    It would usually be low compression at that high a data rate, but entirely depends on what the footage actually is and the audio options.

    H.264 will be one of the codecs used on both Blu-ray Discs and HD-DVD.
     
  14. GFLPraxis macrumors 604

    GFLPraxis

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2004
    #14
    Your PowerBook probably won't be too good for it. The current HD-DVD players being sold have 2.5 GHz Pentium 4's and 1 GB of RAM, and run Red Hat Linux and software HEAVILY optimized for that exact set of hardware (that's why an XBox with a Geforce 3 and Pentium 3 can run Half-Life 2).

    I doubt a G4 PowerBook can handle the same. I tried 720p playback on a MacBook (remember, dual cores) and it even dipped below 30 FPS a couple times.
     

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