Erasing a HD..which is proper way??

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by AJ Muni, Apr 10, 2006.

  1. AJ Muni macrumors 65816

    AJ Muni

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2005
    Location:
    Miami
    #1
    Im really close, well just about done on selling my powerbook and I want to erase my HD so I can give it to the buyer by "factory settings", especially by erasing all my keychain passwords. thanx!
     
  2. lamina macrumors 68000

    lamina

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    Mar 9, 2006
    Location:
    From Canada, living in Seoul
    #2
    Insert the first restore CD that came with it, shut down the computer. Turn it back on and hold down the C button.

    You can take it from there. Choose to erase and restore, and youre good to go.
     
  3. sjshaw macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    #3
    You may want to erase the free space afterwards more securely. Something like this?
     
  4. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

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    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #4
    I've never tried it, but what about using Disk Utility? Choosing 35-Pass Erase should do a good job.

    Picture 2.png
     
  5. sjshaw macrumors regular

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    Feb 18, 2004
    #5
    Much better option. I forgot Disk Utility offered that.
     
  6. Mitthrawnuruodo Moderator emeritus

    Mitthrawnuruodo

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    #6
    Just beware: This might take a while... 7 pass (or really just a clean zero out) should be enough for us normally to lightly paranoid... ;)
     
  7. sjshaw macrumors regular

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    Feb 18, 2004
    #7
    Yeah.. zero-out would probably be enough unless you REALLY want to get rid of that goat pr0n or those secret Iraqi WMD documents.
     
  8. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

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    #8
    Ya, it would probably take a lifetime. :eek:
     
  9. Scarlet Fever macrumors 68040

    Scarlet Fever

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    Bookshop!
    #9
    unless the new owner is a suicidal homicidal paedophile in denial who wants to recover everything on your HDD though any means he can, a 7-pass erase should be enough. :p

    7-pass should make it very difficult to recover anything. The new owner would have to actually try really hard to recover stuff. Unless I worked for a government agency or something like that, i wouldn't bother with a 30-pass write. Its just too big a waste of my time.
     
  10. theBB macrumors 68020

    theBB

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    Jan 3, 2006
    #10
    Does disk utility do this x-pass erase only on your user directory. I figure it cannot erase the stuff that belongs to OSX and complete its job, but how about applications, other user accounts and free hard disk space that has previously erased stuff on it?
     
  11. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

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    #11
    I thought about that, and like I said, I've never tried it. I would assume if you try and select your HDD (not the one labeled 'Macintosh HD', but the level above that), it would either give you an error, or it would erase successfully.

    I'll let someone else try. ;)
     
  12. DTG macrumors member

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    Oct 5, 2003
    Location:
    UK
    #12
    Remember, in order to do this you're not running anything from the HD, you should boot from your OS X Install Disc 1 and run the Disc Utility from there.
    That way you will be able to complete a proper erase (of however many passes you like) of your hard drive.

    I'd say "Zero-out data" should be sufficient, but if you really are worried then go for the "7-pass".

    Enjoy.
     
  13. AJ Muni thread starter macrumors 65816

    AJ Muni

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    Aug 4, 2005
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    Miami
    #13
    thanks guys...im currently typing from my new mbp..this whining is kinda annoying though..
     
  14. SC68Cal macrumors 68000

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    Feb 23, 2006
    #14
    I would recommend doing the 7-pass since you're not going to be using the machine while it's erasing the HD. Writing zeroes to the hard drive is not as secure as you are led to believe
     
  15. NATO macrumors 68000

    NATO

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    Feb 14, 2005
    Location:
    Northern Ireland
    #15
    Just to the 35-Pass erase and get it over with :) Just run it and leave it for a day or so until it finishes. Even with the security offerred by a 7-Pass erase, your mind will be more at ease, especially if you're like me and would keep asking myself 'what if?'
     
  16. JR1forums macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 17, 2006
    #16
    what if you want to run 7-pass over previously deleted volume

    Decided to join the forum after browsing this instructive thread. Here is my situation that I could use some helpful insight on:

    Last night I had to do a hard reboot on my 15 MacBook Pro when it hung on the screensaver. When I rebooted it took 10 minutes + to log me back in. After booting from the install disc to run disk utility, I discovered a vast number of errors on the drive - dozens of the following (Invalid Key Length, Invalid Node Structure, Invalid Record Count, etc.).

    Apple support at first believed this to be a software issue so I spoke with a product specialist and did a clean format of the drive. I chose "zero out" and then did another format and reinstall of the OS. I gave the drive the same name as the first install ("detroit")

    That did not help with the speed issue - computer hung on install of OS where I was filling out ownership data etc.

    After calling again, I was advised they would replace the hard drive. So, even though I did not put any new data on the drive after the reinstall, I want to run a 7-pass for a higher security.

    It took 38 minutes to zero out the drive, so can I assume it will take 7 times as long to run a 7-pass (266 min?)

    Thanks for any insight on this issue I am a novice when it comes to such things.
     
  17. iMacZealot macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2005
    #17
    Resurrection! It's better than being yelled at by some smartass to tell me to search, which I did instead.

    So, you suggest I put in the restore disk, erase and install, AND zero-out (or 7-pass or 35-pass), or just the zero-out?

    Thank you and sorry. :eek:
     
  18. imacdaddy macrumors 6502a

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    Feb 2, 2006
  19. iMacZealot macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2005
    #19
    I'm asking if I need to put in the restore disk AND zero-out/7-pass/35-pass, or simply just the latter.
     
  20. imacdaddy macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2006
    #20
    Sorry. Yes, boot from the restore cd and run disk utility to select your erase options. You cannot run the disk utility and erase option at the system level. Booting to the restore cd allows you to erase the entire disk which your system is on.
     
  21. Calabo macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2008
    #21
    I haven't done a erase free space before and I just need to know exactly what it does. I'm under the impression that it's going to erase all files, folders, etc., but leave all the applications. Is that right? Thanks.
     
  22. IroquoisPliskin macrumors regular

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    Oct 11, 2008
    #22
    A single pass is more than enough for selling a computer.
     
  23. Mitthrawnuruodo Moderator emeritus

    Mitthrawnuruodo

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    Mar 10, 2004
    Location:
    Bergen, Norway
    #23
    Nah...you're thinking of Archive and install, I think (which replaces the system of your Mac but leaves applications and your user's home folder with all your data/files alone).

    Erase free space only writes over deleted files. From Apple Support:

    PS! Love the filename of that support article: duh1010.html! :D
     
  24. Calabo macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2008
    #24
    Ok well then how can I erase all files, folders, and the like... I wanna wipe my computer clean basically.
     
  25. Mitthrawnuruodo Moderator emeritus

    Mitthrawnuruodo

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    Mar 10, 2004
    Location:
    Bergen, Norway
    #25
    Assuming you have current and adequate backup of all the things (apps, files, etc.) you cannot afford loosing on some other disk/place an Erase and Install should do the trick... ;)

    Some good advice before you start: Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard: Information to collect before an Erase and Install

    Mac OS X 10.4, 10.5: About installation options
     

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