Erasing SSD on a damaged air

Discussion in 'MacBook Air' started by SecRpm, Dec 14, 2012.

  1. macrumors newbie

    Mar 18, 2012
    Hey guys,

    I'm wondering if there is a way to completly delete the 128 gb SSD on my Macbook Air 13 Mid 2011?

    It's got a damaged logic board and fan due to water.
    Though the ssd and the rest seem to be okay.

    I've thought about selling it as damaged, but because of the functional ssd and the fact that the air doesn't start at all (except fan spinning like crazy) I can't get rid of my personal data.

    Is there any cheap way to do so? Giving it into service isn't really an option, since the my only local apple service store would charge me ~70€, which would make the selling almost pointless.
  2. macrumors 68000


    Feb 16, 2009
    If you had a friend with a MBA you could just put it in and delete it. I guess you could buy an inclosure for it maybe? Or keep it as a backup for your next computer? Have you thought about selling the MBA for spare parts? Screen. Case. Battery (if it still works and holds a charge). Some online companies will still buy a damaged MBA from you. Might you might make more on eBay.

    Did you have insurance on it?
  3. macrumors 6502a


    Dec 1, 2011
    I would keep the SSD for your next PC/MAC and maybe get a housing for it.
  4. thread starter macrumors newbie

    Mar 18, 2012
    Sadly i don't know anyone with a MBA.
    Buying an enclosure, would again push the profit from selling down.
    Although I might ask someone, who is working for an IT firm, which isn't exactly dealing with apple stuff, but might have a fitting enclosure.

    The insurance paid me already 800€ for it, would have been 900 if I didn't want the MBA back. Seeing similar damaged airs going away for 100+ on ebay, I've decided to sell it myself, rather than giving it away for a fixed price.
  5. macrumors 68000


    Feb 16, 2009
    At that point keep the SSD. Sell the rest.
  6. Moderator emeritus


    Dec 10, 2008
    Very unlikely because the SSD in MBA uses a proprietary connector. Unless he specifically services MBAs or other recent Macs, he has no use for such adapter/enclosure.

Share This Page