ethernet splitter

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by homeshire, Oct 9, 2006.

  1. homeshire macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    Ohio, looking toward Germany
    #1
    i hope this isn't a stupid question, but is there such a thing as an ethernet splitter so that i can direct connect my g5 while leaving the other 2 macs in the house connected through aex? thanks.
     
  2. Demoman macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2005
    Location:
    Issaquah, WA
  3. homeshire thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    Ohio, looking toward Germany
    #3
    what i mean is keeping my g5 hard-wired connected to the cable modem while not cutting off the aex which would keep the other 2 macs in the house connected to the net. would a hub or switch accomplish that? currently, all 3 machines are connected through aex.
     
  4. Markleshark macrumors 603

    Markleshark

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Location:
    Carlisle, Up Norf!
    #4
    What I believe you are looking for is a switch.

    I have Internet -> Router(downstairs) -Cat 5 Crossover-> Switch(In my room) -Cat 5 (Patch)-> Mac/Xbox/Xbox360 (all 3 on different patch cables from Switch)

    [​IMG]
     
  5. bearbo macrumors 68000

    bearbo

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    #5
    what's the difference between hub/switch and router? i have a router, it's 10/100MB/s, but i'd like something that has 1000MB/s, however the router that has that is MUCH more expensive than switch with that (1000MB/s) what's the deal?
     
  6. jeremy.king macrumors 603

    jeremy.king

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Fuquay Varina, NC
    #6
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network_switch#Hubs_vs_switches
     
  7. bearbo macrumors 68000

    bearbo

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    #7
    Thank you, but that's not my question tho... i'm not particularly interested in the difference between a hub and switch... but more interested in the difference between switch and router

    wait a sec.. okay, are hub, switch, and router THREE different things? or are two of those names refering to the same thing... i'm so confused
     
  8. The General macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2006
    #8
    A router provides things like port forwarding, DHCP and firewalls.

    But nevermind all that, you want to do this:

    Modem -> Router -> G5 and Airport Express
     
  9. bearbo macrumors 68000

    bearbo

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    #9
    i think you are a bit confused about who you are replying to

    the OP asked how to share connection, which was well answered, but I later raised the question about the difference between router and switch, do you have an answer?
     
  10. Markleshark macrumors 603

    Markleshark

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Location:
    Carlisle, Up Norf!
    #10
    bearbo,

    A hub and a switch are, although different, bascially the same thing. A hub is an older verion of a switch. They do the same job.

    However, a router is a different thing. More advanced. From wiki:

    A router acts as a junction between two or more networks to transfer data packets among them. A router is different from a switch. A switch connects devices to form a Local area network (LAN).

    One easy illustration for the different functions of routers and switches is to think of switches as neighborhood streets, and the router as the intersections with the street signs. Each house on the street has an address within a range on the block. In the same way, a switch connects various devices each with their own IP address(es) on a LAN.

    However, the switch knows nothing about IP addresses except its own management address. Routers connect networks together the way that on-ramps or major intersections connect streets to both highways and freeways, etc. The street signs at the intersection (routing table) show which way the packets need to flow.


    As far as I know (only 99% sure) you can not plug a switch into your internet and 'split' your ethernet connection, so basically, this wouldnt work

    Internet -> Switch -> Mac/Xbox

    Where as:

    Internet -> Mac (via USB) -> Switch (via Ethernet) -> Xbox/Second Mac/Whatever else

    Would work. But thats only if you had a USB Modem. My setup is more advanced, because I have a PC downstairs and it goes kinda like this:

    Internet (Cable) -> Router -From Router-> PC -Also from Router->Switch (Upstairs) -> then splits into Mac and Xbox360, etc.

    Hope you understand this, if I'm wrong, please correct me. But to answer your question, Hub, switch... Basically the same. Router... Different.
     
  11. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #11


    Very good explaination but you can say it with less words:

    A hub or switch conects devices into a network. A router conects two or more networks"

    Note that most of the littel boxes sold to home users contain both a switch and a router. The idea is that you plug all yuor devices into the switch and the switch is internaly connected to a router which is also conected to the internet via a cable or DSL modem.
     
  12. Dane D. macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2004
    Location:
    ohio
    #12
    Never a stupid question, if you do not know then ask. Your set-up should be as follows:
    Internet connection (cable or DSL modem) ethernet to Router/Switch (my's a 10/100 4-port) ethernet out to various computers. Set the Networking Control Panel Tab - THP/IP to Using DHCP - Built-in Ethernet. I run a small network at home, three computers all connecting to the Router/Switch. Sharing my cable internet connection. No problems, also run similar set-up at work but DSL, larger and with PCs involved.
     

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