Ever hosted an exchange student?

Discussion in 'Community' started by mlw1235, Oct 12, 2004.

  1. mlw1235 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2004
    Location:
    Milwaukee, WI
    #1
    I am.....Joaquin is from Junin, Argentina. He's sooo cool!! :) :)

    Anyone done this before?? Any cool experiences or stories? Anything to look out for?
     
  2. themadchemist macrumors 68030

    themadchemist

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2003
    Location:
    Chi Town
    #2
    No, but be cognizant that both you and he will probably do things that seem odd or inappropriate in the other's culture. Think of it less for its awkward moments than for its opportunities to learn something new. However, that you jumped into this process means that you know a heck of a lot more about it than me anyway.
     
  3. ToastCabbit macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2004
    Location:
    Centre College
    #3
    I'm an exchange student in Japan as I type this. Having tons of fun! Seeing the kindness and generosity of the host families here in Yamaguchi City has made me want to host an exchange student of my own in later years. Enjoy the experience and if any MacRumor forums members are students themselves considering studying abroad, take the plunge and go learn! :D
     
  4. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    Location Location Location
    #4
    That's very cool. :) I have friends I met recently who have done the same thing from Japan, flying over to Australia a few years ago to do an exchange. They loved it, and now they're back here doing Uni!!

    How does it work? Do they pay you just enough for you to feed and house them (so that it doesn't cost you money to host him/her), or does your child go to Argentina as part of the exchange?
     
  5. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

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    Gone but not forgotten.
    #5
    I used to work with a college hosting Japanese exchange students as an introduction. There are many, many differences between the U.S.A. and Japan, so I was busy explaining things to avoid embarrassing or contentious situations.

    I think anyone will find that their language skills are only adequate and that there will be a lot of gesturing between family and student in order to make sense of it all. Romance languages and their words having gender provide some interesting moments. :D

    ToastCabbit:

    That's an interesting choice of places to be. So little happens in Yamaguchi-ken and I think that you would be bored. If you get to Iwakuni, say hello for me. I've been gone too long.
     
  6. Duff-Man macrumors 68030

    Duff-Man

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    Dec 26, 2002
    Location:
    Albuquerque, NM
    #6
    Duff-Man says....I hosted a student from Japan a number of years ago - it was a short term stay though, only about 3 weeks. One of my closest friends has hosted students as well so I have gotten to know those as well, in fact I still keep in contact with the last couple (Japan and Switzerland) and the Swiss girl is now a very good friend that I enjoy visiting whenever I can.....oh yeah!
     
  7. Counterfit macrumors G3

    Counterfit

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    sitting on your shoulder
    #7
    We had Olivier from France stay with us for a week or two before the spring semester started at URI a few years ago (2001 I think). And every so often, my (now former) high school hosts the band from a school in Bunclody, Co. Wexford (that would be Ireland :D), and the trip has been reciprocated. They first came over in 1996, my brother went with "our" band in '97. We went back in 2000 (and that's where I first said that Michael Schumacher was going to win the championship that year! April '00 :D), they came over a year later, and I hear they're coming back this coming February. But it's not really an exchange student thing, as we/they just tour the area (well, you can go to anywhere in Ireland on a day trip ;)) and play a few concerts.
     
  8. iJon macrumors 604

    iJon

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2002
    #8
    We've hosted probably 10 Japanese students over the years. It was a lot of fun. They went to the college up here to study horticulture and it was great fun being with them. They loved Wal-Mart and all the space we had to offer out here. We don't do it anymore cause it just caused inconveniences. We would always have to drive them to school in the morning, pick them up and so forth. I wouldn't mind doing it myself in the future when I am living by myself, I would actually really enjoy it. Maybe host some dutch women ;).

    iJon
     
  9. mlw1235 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2004
    Location:
    Milwaukee, WI
    #9
    They paid for their plane ticket here plus some basic food money and trips and such. Then any meals or trips we take, we pay for. He went to Old World WI today, enjoyed that.

    But this morning, he saw the weather and saw 50* and nearly died. I forgot to tell him we use Farenheit, because 50*C is like 100*F!! He was already dressed in his sweatshirt and stuff, he didn't like that little surprise. :D :D

    Other than that, my spanish is holding up. Thank God!! My brain hurts from all the conjugating of verbs in my head though. Add 10 cups of Calculus, stir, and serve chilled for a nice big headache!! ;)

    Have a good night everyone!!
     
  10. Nermal Moderator

    Nermal

    Staff Member

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    Dec 7, 2002
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    New Zealand
    #10
    I remember when I went to the USA (just for a holiday, not as an exchange student), we had to work out everything - how hot is 70°? How much are we actually paying for this meal? Stuff like that, that you don't even consciously think of normally.

    By the way, press Option-* (Option-Shift-8) to get ° :)
     
  11. scem0 macrumors 604

    scem0

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    Jul 16, 2002
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    back in NYC!
    #11
    My family hosted a foreign exchange student from France.

    It was a while ago, though. Great memories.

    scem0
     
  12. AmigoMac macrumors 68020

    AmigoMac

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    l'Allemagne
    #12
    I've hosted and I've been hosted... Nice experiences...
     
  13. virividox macrumors 601

    virividox

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    Aug 19, 2003
    Location:
    Manila - Nottingham - Philadelphia - Santa Barbar
    #13
    been a host several times its great especially when u find out at the end that they had a great time learning about ur culture and that they really enjoyed their time
     
  14. Les Kern macrumors 68040

    Les Kern

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    Location:
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    #14
    Yes, and it was hell. A girl from Germany, looked like Anna Kournokova, acted like a Gestapo agent. Nothing in America was worth the time to consider, even the roads weren't good enough. Complained about the weather, the food, the people, the TV, the clothes, the sidewalks, the lights, the radio, stop signs, stop lights, flooring tile, water, the bread, our coinage, toasters, ovens, the stores, doorknobs, spices, the milk, hairdo's, jewelry, the trees, cars, furniture, purses, etc., etc, etc. Nothing was as good as in Germany. As god is my witness, we "took it", still hoping that our kindness will warm her to us and the country. Yeah, right. When she left I broke down and said to her "We tried to make your stay here as nice as possible and put up with your constant whining, and I'm sorry it's not Germany. Now go home you spoiled little bitch and raise your Nazi kids, and be sure to teach them how to be as intollerant as you are." Suffice to say it meant nothing to her, and she left mumbling German...
    How lucky you are to have a human being as a guest.
     
  15. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

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    Jun 25, 2002
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    Gone but not forgotten.
    #15
    I would bet that she didn't want to leave Germany and her parents pushed her, don't you think? They probably just moved from one area to another and she was complaining 24/7 that the new area wasn't as good as the old area. "So, dear, we're sending you to the U.S.A. for the summer. We hope you'll enjoy it."
     
  16. Les Kern macrumors 68040

    Les Kern

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    Alabama
    #16
    And my guess is when she got back, that her house was sold and the parents moved to a secret location.
     
  17. takao macrumors 68040

    takao

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    Dec 25, 2003
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    Dornbirn (Austria)
    #17
    don't have to be ...i know about 3-4 who went to the US and came back either desillusioned or conpletly dissapointed and when they left a few months before heading to the US they had big parties (theme USA with flags american etc.)
    i say 3-4 because one girl was sent back 3 days later because of passport visa stuff
    another one got arrested for drinking beer in public (he was confused by other things at well)
    then there was the girl who went there for a whole year doing au pair or something like that..she was talking everyday about america before ...and with every day i mean it literally..after being there she never mentioned the US _once_ in conversations or talked about the expieriences she had over there to us (she visited with 20/21)
    for the fourth person (another girl) she visited it with 15/16 for half a year: combination of puzzlement/confusion,dissapointed
    for those who went to UK,south africa,peru,france i heard mixed answers
    those who were in australia absolutly liked it

    from those who hosted students by themselves: heard no problem (this includes students from france,peru and UK or was it australia)

    here in innsbruck we have lots of US students visiting in sommer months who seem pretty happy as well here (i terms of smiling and behaviour) and i haven't heard of problems

    perhaps some students expect something different than the US really is when they visit it ?..you know after all hollywood and US-TV has a huge influence on opinions about the US ...but somehow i nthe last 2-3 years this seems to have broken up _alot_ (but that doesn't belong here)

    so from what i heard: (no personally expierence..we never hosted any students)..problems can come up but in most cases they don't come up

    (side point 1: germans are world champions about 'talking everything bad even when it's actually good',austrians (especially people from vienna) are the champions in 'complaining about everything even when it doesn't happen at all' ..austrians and germans are pessimistic by default

    side point 2: the same wrong expectations happens the other way around:
    *if you visit Innsbruck which lies in the alps on the map you don't need huge hicking boots 'because it is in the alps' (one of the few things on which you can recognize the US students from hudnred meters away ;) )
    *please completly forget stuff like 'the sound of music'..know ones know this movie here..really..it was never aired on the TV..i personally have heard about it a few months ago... and no-one wears such clothes ;) )
     
  18. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

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    #18
    I suppose everyone would be disillusioned because of t.v. Those programmes rarely show real people and when they do, you probably don't want to see how rude they are.

    The Germans I've met living here have been pretty upbeat about everything here but then, they came from a different time when things weren't so nice there. I think people anywhere would be upset about the unfamiliarity or the lack of world knowledge of other cultures. The U.S.A. is famous for people not knowing other parts of the country, let alone, other parts of the world.

    As far as "The Sound of Music" goes, I doubt anyone in Austria has children wearing draperies. :D American films of that era were quite ignorant of the truth of any culture, including that of the U.S.A.
     
  19. Lyle macrumors 68000

    Lyle

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    Location:
    Madison, Alabama
    #19
    When I was a teenager our family hosted an exchange student from France. He was also a teenager, just a year or so older than my brothers and me. We taught each other how to curse in our native tongues. Good times.
     
  20. Les Kern macrumors 68040

    Les Kern

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    Alabama
    #20
    Hope nobody got the impression I have anything against the German's themselves. This girl was, however, a complete zero and did nothing to warm the relations between our two countries!
     
  21. takao macrumors 68040

    takao

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    Dec 25, 2003
    Location:
    Dornbirn (Austria)
    #21
    well here it's just that the youth people /etc. are completly bombared from everywhere with US tv shows,movies ,video clips etc. you name it...heck even german companies choose english slogans for commercials because 'they sell better'....

    an example of this is somthing as simple as 'cars'..in the 60ties when my mother was a teenager there where _4_ cars in our whole street and surounding neighourhood..3 of them were mercedes of business owners and one a small italian the form the 'high school' maths teacher..my grandfather built up a business with central heatings (oil/wood) after the war and had one of these mercedes..if the neighbours had to get to other towns they come to my grandfather sometimes and asked him to drive them there ..in the 60ties public transportation was still developing..you know the Nazis scrapped the local perfectly working san francisco like elctric tram in favour for the car...
    my grand parents (from the mother side) had a half-football-field sized potato/onion field ..without that they would have been starving through the years from 43-53 (so they had potato soup 4 times a week...meat about every 3-4 weeks) here there never existed something like "the good ol' days"
    the family of my father didn't a car untill the grown up son bought one ... they were simple farmers in a very small village in valley in carintiha (english spelling ?) he had to walk 1.5 hour to school in the 50ties and beginning of the 60ties and some school-friends of him walked even longer distances without shoes

    well in the 50ties nothing was 'good' in austria my father actually weared classical traditional funny clothes...my mother never..she was a girl of a small town business owners...
     
  22. takao macrumors 68040

    takao

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2003
    Location:
    Dornbirn (Austria)
    #22
    well to the majority of germans/austrians the words "nazi" and especially "gestapo" are perhaps the "ultimate" insulting words ("gestapo" even 'outclasses' "SSler" (in the local dialect) in that)

    my grandmother still knows after 50 years which of the neighbouring families were "nazis" or even "SSler" (aka. used for the ultimate fanatics)... you know one of her uncles was on the eastern front and saw the cruelties against jews and the local population (including concentration camps) and told about it on his "resting vacation at home" of about what he saw..but of course only to close relatives and to very trusted people..because he saw as well what happend to those who talked about it too much in the open or around "SSler","nazi" families or germans who were 'brought into saftey' from german big towns..the walls had ears at that time ... because of this nobody i nthe family knew what would happen when the french finally arrived here (yes the french liberated my hometown) ... except some few isolated mob justice cases towards former "SSler" families the french where able to keep it under control (winning "hearts and minds" with organzing barbeques...i'm not joking)..but from event where they were told what happens o nthe eastern front the familiy(aka those informed) position towards the mistrusted "nazis"/"SSler" was confirmed in an ugly way

    even 50ties years later some families are still mistrusted generally ...at least in our familiy...some others weren't as picky ...
    the uncle came out of the war with perhaps the 3rd worst outcome possible after death and being a cripple...he got into a russian POW camp in sibyria
    (as mentioned before in another thread) and was under the 10% of those who survived and came back in 1955 with completly broken mind (because of war,cruelties he saw and sibyria) and of course nearly starved to death..5 years later he died as a man who was the complete opposite before the war... he suffered and lost his friends and 1 brother not for 'nothing' but even worse..for something completly wrong.....
    in america words like "nazi" "gestapo" are thrown around pretty quick and in complete the wrong way (sometimes) and i won't start about how hillary clinton is called 'femi-nazi' by some people...

    but of course i wasn't really offended but some people could be offended a lot...

    you know it's often forgotten that after all those german/austrian/etc. soldiers who died for the complete wrong thing still died... it was the second generation completle eliminated within 30 years (additional to those killed by these generations of course)
    if the US would have lost 30 millions of 18-30 year olds within 30 years,getting 40-90% of all their urban houses destroyed and completly lost their intelectual elite just because of an insane guy and a stupid one in 2 wars for the wrong things then ...i'm pretty sure of that... the majority of americans would be grumpy and pessemistic for decades too...

    (well the austrians were already pessemistic before the 20th century ..so this only works for the germans ;) )
     
  23. wdlove macrumors P6

    wdlove

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2002
    #23
    My wife and I hosted a Japanese student while we lived in Omaha, Nebraska. My wife was a student at Creighton University. Our student entered a special program at Creighton. He did very well with English. My wife enjoyed getting cooking lessons. He said that men don't cook, but he didn't want to starve. So he had his mother teach him. It was an enjoyable time.
     
  24. acceber macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #24
    I once hosted a Japanese exchange student for a week. It was intended for two weeks but she had some issues with our family and left us to go stay with her friend (a fellow exchange student) with another family.

    It left me devastated as I thought she was having a great time with us. She asked me to help her write in her diary and wrote stuff about how she was enjoying spending time with our family and she looked really happy. I was obviously wrong. We tried really hard to make her comfortable because we could empathasise with how difficult it must be to move to a foreign country. I cried my eyes out because it was awesome to have the experience cut short by something I had no idea about.

    Later on, she mailed us from Japan and apologised saying that she just wanted to be with her friend and realised how selfish she had been. Her parents mailed us also with apologies. It was about five years ago, but I still don't understand fully to this day the motive behind her suddenly deciding that she didn't like us. :confused:
     
  25. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

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    #25
    Knowing as many Japanese exchange students as I have, I think that she was probably happy for the experience but completely overwhelmed. Japanese study English almost as much as Japanese but rarely do they speak it. One of my friends was in an English speakers club and still didn't do well. (I met the professor at their Uni. and I certainly understand. :eek:)

    Out of the group, many were homesick, overwhelmed, and disliked the food but enjoyed the people. Everyone has a pre-conceived notion of what their trip will be but it rarely turns out that way. Your student's apparently was unreachable because she made it too amazing. I'm sure she appreciated your every effort. :)
     

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