external HD + enclosure: yes or no?

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by c23roo, Oct 23, 2006.

  1. c23roo macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 29, 2004
    #1
    I know this question has been all over the boards, but I feel like I've learned a lot and now I'm just more confused (just like the rest of my education... but I digress).

    Quick background: I want an external HD to back up my desktop (PM Quad 2.5 of RAM, 500 GB HD).

    Am I really capable of putting together a HD and an enclosure? Maybe I'm making more out of this than it seems - but y'all make it sound quite simple, and it seems like it should save me some cash. After researching, I'm going with Seagate. However, I still have some questions - please help!

    What's the difference among these: (aside from the last one coming in its own enclosure)? How does Ultra ATA compare with SATA?

    Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 ST3500630A 500GB 7200 RPM IDE Ultra ATA100 Hard Drive - OEM
    Average Latency: 4.16ms
    Average Seek Time: 11ms
    Cache: 16MB
    Features: Perpendicular Recording Adaptive Fly Height Clean Sweep Directed Offline Scan Seagate SoftSonic Enhanced G-Force Protection
    Form Factor: 3.5"
    Model #: ST3500630A

    Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 ST3500630AS 500GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s Hard Drive - OEM
    Average Latency: 4.16ms
    Average Seek Time: 8.5ms
    Cache: 16MB
    Features: Perpendicular Recording Adaptive Fly Height Clean Sweep Directed Offline Scan Seagate SoftSonic Enhanced G-Force Protection
    Form Factor: 3.5"
    Model #: ST3500630AS

    Seagate ST3500601XS-RK 500GB 7200 RPM External Hard Drive - Retail
    Cache: 16MB
    Dimensions: 7.2" x 6.5" x 2.3" 7.2" x 3.0" x 6.8" (with pedestal)
    Features: Integrates the award-winning Seagate SATA drives with Native Command Queuing (NCQ) Allows for a RAID setup with the purchase of an eSATA RAID controller Enables simple plug-and-play with shielded cables and connectors
    Form Factor: 3.5"
    Interface: eSATA
    Weight: 2.6 lbs.
    Model #: ST3500601XS-RK
     
  2. slackersonly macrumors 6502a

    slackersonly

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2006
    #2
    I have put together 3 external drives so far and honestly the hardest part is dealing with the small screws used to put the enclosure together.

    If you at all considering getting more that one external drive, consider getting a larger enclosure from the start. I wish I had done so....

    On a quick inspection:
    1) is an IDE drive
    2) is an SATA drive
    3) is an SATA drive with enclosure

    If you go with #1 or #2, make sure the external case matchs the type (IDE or SATA).

    I would recommend cases from macsales.com as mine have been quiet and dependable.
     
  3. c23roo thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 29, 2004
    #3
    forgive my ignorance...

    Okay, I'm following so far.

    So what's the difference between IDE and SATA?

    Thanks!
     
  4. roland.g macrumors 603

    roland.g

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2005
    Location:
    One mile up and soaring
    #4
    SATA is faster the IDE, however, SATA cases are more expensive/newer and if I'm correct, SATA really only makes a difference now for internal drives. No computers that I know of come with a SATA port. So you can't run a SATA cable from the computer to the drive enclosure. So you could get a SATA drive and enclosure, but most likely you are using USB 2.0, FW400 or FW800 for your transfer cable, which becomes the limiting factor. I think even FW800 is slower than and IDE drive, so going SATA is just more expensive. Get a Seatgate (great drive), I would go with a 7200.10 for the perpendicular drive recording and a good case, either FW400 or FW800 and you will be happy.
     
  5. xiaoyu04 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2006
    Location:
    Merced, CA
    #5
    sata and ide are two completely different interfaces and sata support much higher data rates than traditional ide drives.
     
  6. roland.g macrumors 603

    roland.g

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2005
    Location:
    One mile up and soaring
    #6
    Also, 500GB drives tend to cost more per GB than 320 and 400 drives. You can get a 7200.10 320GB from Newegg.com for about $95-$110. I think the 500 is $235. The 400 is about $180 or so. But last I checked prices was 4-5 weeks ago.
     
  7. slackersonly macrumors 6502a

    slackersonly

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2006
    #7
    outpost.com (or frys.com if that conversion is complete) also has great Seagate drive deals for 300-400gb drives.
     
  8. c23roo thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 29, 2004
    #8
    okay, next step...

    OK, so if I go with the Barracuda (SATA) above, can anyone recommend a case for it? I went to the macsales link (also above) and just got more confused. So more stupid questions (and thanks for being patient)...

    How is it the drive plugs into the computer? I thought there would be a firewire connection, but it says the interface is SATA, not FW800. Maybe it's just because I'm completely overtired and exhausted, but I need some help!

    - Thx!
     
  9. ®îçhå®? macrumors 68000

    ®îçhå®?

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2006
    #9
    I just went to CostCo yesterday and bought a 250GB drive for £55. I'm happy with that as it stores everything that i need.
     
  10. roland.g macrumors 603

    roland.g

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2005
    Location:
    One mile up and soaring
    #10
    Here get this drive and this case, but personally I would get this drive because it is $95 for a 320GB vs. $230 for a 500GB. That's $0.30/GB vs. $0.46/GB.

    You may find a case you like better elsewhere, or if you only have FW400, get a case that supports that, they happen to be cheaper. Whatever you do make sure the case you get can is rated for the size drive you get. You may also find the Seagate drives cheaper somewhere else.
     
  11. johan_tanying macrumors member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2004
    #11
    Go for FW800 since your hardware has it. You will never regret it.
     

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