Fastest drive for MacPro (regardless of capacity)

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by hayduke, Feb 9, 2007.

  1. hayduke macrumors 65816

    hayduke

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    #1
    What is the fastest/best drive you can get for the MacPro if capacity isn't the concern. Is a 10000RPM SATA drive as good as it gets? Are smaller drives faster than larger drives?
     
  2. DigitalN. macrumors member

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    #2
    150 gig Western Digital Raptop RAID is about as fast as it gets in SATA.
     
  3. THX1139 macrumors 68000

    THX1139

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    #3
    And the loudest...
     
  4. CanadaRAM macrumors G5

    CanadaRAM

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    #4
  5. hayduke thread starter macrumors 65816

    hayduke

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    #5

    Are you suggesting a hardware RAID set of these linky linky? I was thinking of an internal drive that I would probably boot off of and then use the current 750 GB drive as a "data" drive and scratch drive. Is that a sensible thing to do?
     
  6. bearbo macrumors 68000

    bearbo

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    #6
    does Raptor X has any technical advantage over Raptor?

    does any 15000RPM drive work with mac pro (with SCSI interface)?
     
  7. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

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    #7
    No. It just has a window so you can watch it work

    Not in the standard drive bays. They are hardwired for SATA.
     
  8. DigitalN. macrumors member

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    #8
    he said nothing of noise concern, and they are not terribly loud if you get grommets, if you dont, good luck.
     
  9. CanadaRAM macrumors G5

    CanadaRAM

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    #9
    Actually, smaller drives are slower than larger ones.

    1) lower areal density. A larger capacity drive usually packs more data bits per track, such as with perpendicular recording
    2) the heads move to inside tracks sooner (throughput is directly related to the track length - that is, the londitudinal distance the head covers in one complete revolution. The closer you get to the hub of the platter, the less data passes under the head in one revolution
    3) Smaller platter diameter, in the Raptors and in laptop drives, means less data per revolution compared to 'full size' 3.5" platters (see (2))
     
  10. djellison macrumors 68020

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    #10
    Not sure what you are trying to say - but upgrading my PC's hard-drive from a 7200rpm Segate to a 70 gig Raptor gave me an ENORMOUS improvement in the responsiveness and 'snappy' performance jumping from app to app, loading and working on large files etc.

    http://tomshardware.co.uk/storage/charts.html?modelx=33&model1=280&model2=142&chart=48
    From an annecdotal perspective - I would agree with that chart.

    If I had a Mac Pro - dropping a raptor in as the system HDD would be on my list of 'to dos'

    Doug
     
  11. hayduke thread starter macrumors 65816

    hayduke

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    #11
    This is great to hear. I'll look into it a bit more. Thanks for the tips. The Raptor sounds good.
     
  12. Sesshi macrumors G3

    Sesshi

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    #12
    I have no idea whether you can get the SAS controller separately - SAS compatibility is there on the XServes. I run all my Dell Precisions and one of my XPS's using 15K SAS drives - they would be the best you can get, but you may have to settle for second best on the Mac.
     
  13. AlexMaximus macrumors 6502

    AlexMaximus

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    #13
    go for Raptor 150

    :apple: On the speed side the Raptor 150 G is unbeatable among all drives in the SATA field. Use it as a boot drive and you will be more then happy. I would not go with the X version (the one with the window) because of heat.
    The window is non metal and does not contribute to heat radiation. This means the X version is hotter and has a shorter product live cycle.

    However if money is not an issue go with a 15K SCSI, however this is most expensive. I am wondering in the days of Raptor how SCSI is able to sell.
     
  14. synth3tik macrumors 68040

    synth3tik

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    #14
    I use a 150G WD Raptor drive. it runs at 10K and yes it is a little louder, nothing bad though
     
  15. NATO macrumors 68000

    NATO

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    #15
    The Raptor-X (as opposed to the non-windowed version) has a lower MTBF reliability, so I wouldn't bother with it unless you *really* want to watch it through the little window :D
     
  16. SmurfBoxMasta macrumors 65816

    SmurfBoxMasta

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    #16
    Well, In my QS, I have 2 Raptors, 1x 36GB as a boot drive, and a 74GB as a scratch disk, and they s c r e a m........they are way, way faster than any of the old ATA drives that were in there when I got it.........
     
  17. Houston macrumors regular

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    #17
    Fast Drives

    I have 4 Raptor 150 drives running in an Stripped Array configuration in my Mac Pro 3 Ghz computer. Guess that's about a fast as you can get until new MacPro is finally released. It smokes!!!
     
  18. slicedbread macrumors regular

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    Nov 5, 2006
    #18
    Can you even use grommets with the mac pro bay sleeves? I know from my own experience that grommeted HDDs are almost silent in comparison, but did not know you could use them on a mac pro. Where can you even get them?
     
  19. product26 macrumors 6502a

    product26

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    #19
    you can use grommets, but they need to be very thin. Otherwise the drive will hang too low and will not line up properly with the connections inside.
     
  20. theblotted macrumors regular

    theblotted

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    #20
  21. Houston macrumors regular

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    #21
    The Raptors are very quiet. I can't even hear them. I've never heard a fan go on, so they must not create too much heat. I couldn't be more pleased.
     
  22. synth3tik macrumors 68040

    synth3tik

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    #22

    unless my office is ultra quite. I would have to disagree, when I first installed my Raptor, I could have sworn that the drive was bad, as It was really load. Before my Mac Pro how ever I had a Quicksilver that was rather noisy so dealing with a Mac Pro is very strange to me. Being able to hear the drives spin up with out having fan noise covering the room.

    The drive is not bad at all, but I did notice a difference between it and my 7.2k
     
  23. Rad macrumors regular

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    Aug 8, 2006
    #23
    Raptor X RAID 0

    I boot off a pair of internal Raptor X 150 GB drives in a RAID 0. Fantastic performance. Minimal noise. Perfect reliability. Earlier used two WD RE2 5000 GB drives in a RAID 0 array and it too was very responsive. Either way, using a RAID 0 TREMENDOUSLY improved overall responsiveness. Since RAID 0 inherently is a little risky, I have SuperDuper set up to mirror the start RAID every night to another non-RAID partition - which helps, since prior Apple firware upgrades cannot boot from a RAID startup disk when updating.:) :)
     

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