Figure THIS Out

Discussion in 'Community' started by Scifience, Mar 4, 2004.

  1. Scifience macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2003
    #1
    Logic Puzzle

    A fun little puzzle to start your day. Don't cheat and read the anwer/explination until you've tried on your own. :)
     
  2. MongoTheGeek macrumors 68040

    MongoTheGeek

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2003
    Location:
    Its not so much where you are as when you are.
    #2
    Thank you. That was enough thinking to wake me up...

    Back in HS I started the day with calc...
    In college all of the Engineering and Math profs liked to take the afternoons oft so it was Diffy Q at 8am.
     
  3. agreenster macrumors 68000

    agreenster

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2001
    Location:
    Walt Disney Animation Studios
    #3
    I havent looked at the answer yet, but Im going to guess 9 2 and 2. (the two year olds are twins) Thats the only one that works I think...


    Edit

    Hey! I was right. But I must admit, I didnt factor in the multiple sums. (which means that 6 6 and 1 was another possibility, without knowing that tidbit) 2 2 and 9 was just the one that seemed most logical to me.

    Oh yeah--when I was in HS too, my first class every Monday Wednesday (every other Fri) was Calc. I had the best Calc teacher, and it was such a waker-upper. I forgot how stressful a test or final at 8AM was. Yikes. Its been years since Ive had to be anywhere at 8AM. All my college classes were 9, and work is 9.
     
  4. rainman::|:| macrumors 603

    rainman::|:|

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2002
    Location:
    iowa
    #4
    Bloody hell, i hate these questions. Hell, i hate math in general. I skip these questions on IQ tests, simply because i don't feel like looking at them. Still scored 98%, so it works :)

    I do enjoy other types of logic puzzles, just not math-based. They're all the same problem, with different names inserted. "Carlos has three orchards of orange trees, one has twice as many as another, and the third has..." blah...

    paul
     
  5. kylos macrumors 6502a

    kylos

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2002
    Location:
    MI
    #5
    I feel dumb. I understood the reason for the last clue (that two sums were the same but in one the oldest were twins) but I did poorly with the math, forgetting all the possibilities with 1 as a factor. I simply came up with the factors 3,3,2,2. Agghhh.
     
  6. jeremy.king macrumors 603

    jeremy.king

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Fuquay Varina, NC
    #6
    I don't buy the explanation. The key word is oldest. I didn't assume that oldest meant there was only one child that could be oldest. If I have two 6 year olds. (A) its possible that two kids (not twins) were born within a year of each other. (B) Twins there were not born at the exact same time, therefore one is "older" or "oldest"

    6,6,1 is still possible based on that reasoning.
     
  7. agreenster macrumors 68000

    agreenster

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2001
    Location:
    Walt Disney Animation Studios
    #7
    Woooo. Poor mom. Way to go dad. :D

    I think you're just clutching at straws here...its just a riddle for cripes sakes.
     
  8. Toppa G's macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2003
    Location:
    The exurbs, MN
    #8
    how did you score a 98% on an IQ test? Does that mean you're 98% intelligent? What could the standard for 100% intelligence be? ;)
     
  9. whooleytoo macrumors 603

    whooleytoo

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Location:
    Cork, Ireland.
    #9
    You're actually spot-on. A lot of IQ / logic tests have multiple answers, but they expect a certain one..

    One of my favorite stories - I've heard several versions, so it's probably not true - is from a physics exam. (Hope this isn't too long for these forums):

    PHYSICS FINAL EXAM QUESTION

    >>Some time ago I received a call from a colleague, who
    >>asked if I would be the referee on the grading of an
    >>examination question.
    >>
    >>He was about to give a student a zero for his answer
    >>to a physics question, while the student claimed he
    >>should receive a perfect score and would if the system
    >>were not set up against the student.
    >>
    >>The instructor and the student agreed to an impartial
    >>arbiter, and I was selected. I went to my colleague's
    >>office and read the examination question:
    >>"Show how it is possible to determine the height of a
    >>tall building with the aid of a barometer."
    >>
    >>The student had answered:
    >>"Take the barometer to the top of the building, attach
    >>a long rope to it, lower it to the street, and then
    >>bring it up, measuring the length of the rope. The
    >>length of the rope is the height of the building."
    >>
    >>I pointed out that the student really had a strong
    >>case for full credit since he had really answered the
    >>question completely and correctly.
    >>
    >>On the other hand, if full credit were given, it could
    >>well contribute to a high grade in his physics course.
    >>A high grade is supposed to certify competence in
    >>physics, but the answer did not confirm this.
    >>
    >>I suggested that the student have another try at
    >>answering the question. I was not surprised that my
    >>colleague agreed, but I was surprised when the student
    >>did. I gave the student six minutes to answer the
    >>question with the warning that the answer should show
    >>some knowledge of physics.
    >>
    >>At the end of five minutes, he had not written
    >>anything. I asked if he wished to give up, but he said
    >>no. He had many answers to this problem; he was just
    >>thinkingof the best one.
    >>
    >>I excused myself for interrupting him and asked him to
    >>please go on. In the next minute, he dashed off his
    >>answer which read: "Take the barometer to the top of
    >>the building and lean over the edge of the roof. Drop
    >>the barometer, timing its fall with a stopwatch, then,
    >>using the formula x=0.5*a*t^2, calculate the height of
    >>the building."
    >>
    >>At this point, I asked my colleague if he would give
    >>up.
    >>
    >>He conceded, and gave the student almost full credit.
    >>
    >>In leaving my colleague's office, I recalled that the
    >>student had said that he had other answers to the
    >>problem, so I asked him what they were.
    >>
    >>"Well," said the student, "there are many ways of
    >>getting the height of a tall building with the aid of
    >>a barometer.
    >>
    >>For example, you could take the barometer out on a
    >>sunny day and measure the height of the barometer, the
    >>length of its shadow, and the length of the shadow of
    >>the building, and by the use of simple proportion,
    >>determine the heightof the building."
    >>
    >>"Fine," I said, "and others?"
    >>
    >>"Yes," said the student. "There is a very basic
    >>measurement method you will like. In this method, you
    >>take the barometer and begin to walk up the stairs. As
    >>you climb the stairs, you mark off the length of the
    >>barometer along the wall. You then count the number of
    >>marks, and this will give you the height of the
    >>building in barometer units."
    >>
    >>"A very direct method."
    >>
    >>"Of course. If you want a more sophisticated method,
    >>you can tie the barometer to the end of a string,
    >>swing it as a pendulum, and determine the value of g
    >>at the street level and at the top of the building.
    >>>From the difference between the two values of g, the
    >>height of the building, in principle, can be
    >>calculated."
    >>
    >>"On this same tack, you could take the barometer to
    >>the top of the building, attach a long rope to it,
    >>lower it to just above the street, and then swing it
    >>as a pendulum. You could then calculate the height of
    >>the building by theperiod of the precession."
    >>
    >>"Finally," he concluded, "there are many other ways of
    >>solving the problem. Probably the best," he said, "is
    >>to take the barometer to the basement and knock on the
    >>superintendent's door. When the superintendent
    >>answers, you speak to him as follows: 'Mr.
    >>Superintendent, here is a fine barometer. If you will
    >>tell me the height of the building, I will give you
    >>this barometer.'"
    >>
    >>At this point, I asked the student if he really did
    >>not
    >>know the conventional answer to this question. He
    >>admitted that he did, but said that he was fed up with
    >>college instructors trying to teach him how to think.
     
  10. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2003
    Location:
    Colly-fornia
    #10
    'Born, as we say here in Lake Wobegon, nine months and ten minutes apart...'
    ;)
     
  11. bwaadass macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2004
    Location:
    UK
    #11
    The above referenced student was Niels Bohr, the only Dane to win the Nobel
    prize for Physics. (or so it says on some website...)
     
  12. rainman::|:| macrumors 603

    rainman::|:|

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2002
    Location:
    iowa
    #12
    My understanding of that barometer story is that it's a collection of mostly urban legend type facts, put into one story. I've heard it many times, but with only one of the answers, or some. This is the first time I've read such a detailed account of the arbetration. I doubt it's Bohr. Stories attributed to famous people are rarely attributed correctly...

    And 98% on an intelligence test means that if you lined 100 average people in a row, in order of IQ, i would be one of the last two people. 98th percentile, i should have said, not 98%. You got me for laziness ;)

    paul
     
  13. bwaadass macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2004
    Location:
    UK
    #13
    "And 98% on an intelligence test means that if you lined 100 average people in a row, in order of IQ, i would be one of the last two people. 98th percentile, i should have said, not 98%."

    Wouldn't that be one of the last 3 people???
     
  14. eyelikeart Moderator emeritus

    eyelikeart

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2001
    Location:
    Metairie, LA
    #14
    Blammo! :D

    Does this mean my day will be rewarding & fulfilling? ;)
     
  15. Oirectine macrumors regular

    Oirectine

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2003
    Location:
    Tokyo, Japan
    #15
    This was lame. Just because there is an oldest child doesn't mean both children can't be the same number of years old (rounded, of course).

    LAME.

    :mad:
     
  16. SilentPanda Moderator emeritus

    SilentPanda

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2002
    Location:
    The Bamboo Forest
    #16
    If 1 1/2 geese lay 1 1/2 eggs in 1 1/2 days, how many eggs will 6 geese lay in 8 days?

    :D
     
  17. jazzmfk macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2003
    Location:
    Jersey. Route 78, exit 24. Gotta problem with th
    #17
    paul -

    Have you ever considered membership in Mensa? The only requirement is that you have scored at or above the 98th percentile on an approved standardized test. I'm a member, and though I don't go to meetings or anything, the Bulletin and other publications are well worth the yearly dues.

    I often wonder if the Mac/PC ratio is different among Mensa members.


    MFK
     
  18. jeremy.king macrumors 603

    jeremy.king

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Fuquay Varina, NC
    #18
    well 1.5 geese would lay 8 eggs in 8 days

    so I figure 6 geese would lay 32 eggs in 8 days. no?
     
  19. rueyeet macrumors 65816

    rueyeet

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2003
    Location:
    MD
    #19
    My guess was 6, 3, 2....I just factored out 36 and figured six was old enough to play the piano. I did not account for the second step of "more information needed" meaning that two of the sums would be the same. *shrug*
     
  20. SilentPanda Moderator emeritus

    SilentPanda

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2002
    Location:
    The Bamboo Forest
    #20
    My guess was 36, 1, and 1. But that's mainly because I'm lazy...
     

Share This Page