file system

Discussion in 'macOS' started by -::ubermann::-, Oct 4, 2006.

  1. -::ubermann::- macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2006
    #1
    i have suse and mac tiger installed on my macbook, i left 20 GB of free space to store my files i want to share (read/write)among tiger and linux
    so, which format do you suggest to use?
    i know ntfs, but is there an alternative? if its ntfs only what program should i use to format? :confused:
     
  2. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    Gone but not forgotten.
    #2
    Isn't UFS (UNIX File System) available in Linux?
     
  3. darkcurse macrumors 6502a

    darkcurse

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2005
    Location:
    Sydney
    #3
    Just do what most people do and format it in FAT32. That way you won't have to worry about both of them being able to read/write to that partition.
     
  4. Kunimodi macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2006
    Location:
    Ashland, OR, USA
    #4
    If you are using just OS X and GNU/Linux I would suggest that you don't use NTFS or FAT32 as those are windows-land formats. Although, FAT32 is well supported, it's not a reliable filesystem. I would recommend UFS. The journalled HFS+ filesystem has only limited support on Linux. More details: http://gentoo-wiki.com/HOWTO_hfsplus
     
  5. -::ubermann::- thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2006
    #5
    ok ive now formated that partition in UFS
    i can write/read in mac os, but when i browse it in suse linux it appears a message "access denied", do you know how to fix this so i can read/write in suse?


    this should be in suseforums, but anyways...
     
  6. jhu macrumors 6502a

    jhu

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2004
    #6
    linux doesn't have reliable ufs write support. this is mostly due to differing implementations of ufs (ie, solaris vs. *bsd vs. darwin vs. hp-ux, etc). you should use ext2 and then install ext2fsx to access the ext2 partition from os x. actually if you do that, you don't even need a separate data-sharing partition since your linux partition (assuming you use ext2/ext3) can be the data partition
     
  7. -::ubermann::- thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2006
    #7
    hey i tried adding this line to fstab:
    /dev/sda3 /mnt/Linux_Data reiserfs auto,users,rw,exec 0 0

    but still doesnt work (it is sda3)
     
  8. jhu macrumors 6502a

    jhu

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2004
    #8
    i don't get it. fstab for os x or linux? also, did you format it as reiserfs?
     
  9. -::ubermann::- thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2006
    #9
    i formatted it in ufs, here is what i get:
    26G media is what im trying to mount, when i try to access or mount it says ''access denied'', however in mac os i can read and write

    [​IMG]
     
  10. jhu macrumors 6502a

    jhu

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2004
    #10
    according to your fstab, it should mount automatically when it boots. are you unable to browse the partition?

    also linux doesn't have reliable ufs write capabilities. as such, i suggest you merge the 9.6 gb ext2 partition and the 26 gb ufs partition into one 37 gb ext3 partition. reinstall linux on this new partition. then install ext2fsx in os x to access the 37 gb partition under os x.
     
  11. -::ubermann::- thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2006
    #11
    yeah, i was unable to access or mount the partition even in root user

    can ext2fsx read and write in ext3 or only in ext2?
     
  12. jhu macrumors 6502a

    jhu

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2004
    #12
    i just repartitioned my 40gb harddrive with 10gb hfs+ and 30gb ext3. ext2fsx works well. ext2fsx supports ext2, but since ext3 = ext2 + journaling, it doesn't really matter that ext3 isn't supported.
     

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