Film industry 'needs an iMovies'

Discussion in 'MacBytes.com News Discussion' started by MacBytes, Jul 12, 2004.

  1. macrumors bot

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    #1
  2. macrumors 6502

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  3. macrumors member

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    Think Ahead.

    This would be counterproductive.

    Atm - finding the films u want on the internet is very difficult. By flooding the market with small, easily pirated movies would be counterproductive.

    The reason why itunes is not having a negative impact is that music piracy was already widespread. Movie piracy is not widespread. Not yet. H.264 might provide the means for movie piracy to bloom. But do not accelerate its rise.
     
  4. macrumors regular

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    #4
    Boo Hoo....poor MPA....

    I see the problem of music piracy as a direct result of the greed of the RIAA. If it didn't cost $12-22 for a cd that you might get a few "good" songs on, then perhaps "piracy" would not have become as widespread as it is today. I'm sure it would have existed, but just not as "bad".

    The whole issue pisses me off anyway, because according to the RIAA, me giving my friend a cd he likes is "piracy" (RIAA doesn't like sharing).

    But I just don't see movie "piracy" being that big of a problem. I have never downloaded a movie I like because it is just a pain in the butt. If you are lucky enough to successfully download the movie you're looking for, then the quality sucks, no 5.1 etc. To me it is worth it to buy the movie for $10-20. As long as the movie industry does'nt get greedy like the RIAA (which they allready are with the frickin' ticket prices) and keeps the costs of DVD's down - then it will probably never be as bad as "they worry about". I know H.262 is going to be awesome and all...but still, how long will it take to download a 2 hour movie on a cable modem (which right now my bandwidth is at 2400k!)? I see the impact of H.262 being the best for offering high-res DVD's.
     
  5. macrumors member

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    I agree. Cd prices are too high. People would buy many more CD's if they werent so expensive.

    Ure right - it is a pain in the but. Should they provide a flood of movies to be pirated online - movie pirating WILL become a problem. Atm i download 2 gigs a day of material. I dont download movies - why? The time spent finding them is too high. If the problem was more widespread and finding the movies to download was easier - then u would have a problem on ure hands. Have a look at animesuki.com. People are downloading thousands of dollars worth of anime each day. Why? Because its easy. The size of the material is seemingly irrelevant.

    Providing an online movie store would provide the means by which movie pirating could bloom.

    On a side note, H.264, while great technology ,it will only make the problem worse.
     
  6. macrumors 68020

    mainstreetmark

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    #6
    Those are the same set of reasons SJ gave when introducing iTunes. At the time (and currently), it's still quite difficult to download a high-quality, decent song in a decent amount of time. In fact, I regularly have more success torrenting entire movies than I do downloading a single, mildly obscure song from Acquisition/iSwipe or what-have-you.

    Apple clearly knows the business of a successful DRM-backed media download service. They pop Fairplay on top of quicktime's video (in addition to it's audio) and suddenly, iMovie has a iMovie Video Store. Sure, it may take you an hour or three to download the movie, or you may just want to let it go all night or while at work/school. So what! Order the same thing off Amazon and it'll take 5 days.

    I'm sure iMovie will have a button that says "Make this into a DVD" or whatever, and poof - there it is.

    It's inevitable.

    Here's the roadblocks:
    - People not willing to wait a couple hours for the download for some silly reason. Go Outside and Play during this time.
    - MPAA's greed. I doubt it would be as high as RIAA's, but it'll be there.
    - Similarly, licensing contracts and lawyers.
    - The decision to support in-theater movies or just those that have been released to DVDs
    - The technology to encapsulate all the DVD extras into a quicktime file, or a quicktime file and a DVD-extra-crap file.
     
  7. macrumors 6502

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    #7
    I think what it comes down to is in music or movies whatever, it has to be a quality peice of work. I pay for things that are well made. I buy cds I love, even though I may have downloaded the songs already. Also for the movies, it is tough to get the same quality of movie. I hate watching those movies that people just take a camera into the theater. It is just terrible. Plus all the speical features you don't get if you are talking about ones on dvds.
     
  8. macrumors member

    dfa4

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    #8
    Not iMovies, but iFlicks

    Just my 2¢, but if Apple ever introduces an online store for downloadable movies, it won't be called iMovies and won't be embedded into iMovie. Unlike iTunes, which is a playback and organization tool, iMovie is a creation application and doesn't easily lend itself as a front-end access to an online store. So my prediction is that it will be called, assuming it comes to reality, iFlicks and will be a stand-alone app.

    Not a very dramatic post, but like I said, just my 2¢.
    --
    Duane Fitzgerald Andrews
    Cornell '99, Cornell Law '02
    http://dandy.spymac.net
     
  9. macrumors 68020

    mainstreetmark

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    #9
    That's a good 2¢ worth!

    Perhaps, then, even into a new, revamped quicktime player, although I'd hate to see it bloat up like Real and WMP
     
  10. macrumors regular

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    #10
    H.264

    Anyone know if H.264 has any sort of DRM that can be attached to it? I know this is one of Apple's feather in the cap so to speak. It might just be the way for downloading movies to happen. I also think the idea of beefing up quicktime alittle to support this would be great. You know it really is hard to come up with good names for applications like this.
     
  11. macrumors 68040

    shamino

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    #11
    If you have dial-up, the download will also take 5 days. And what would you rather own when you're done - a DVD with HD resolution, surround sound and bonus tracks or a hard drive-filling file that you have to spend hours in front of the computer to watch? Burn the result to DVD? Maybe, but the result won't be as nice as a purchased DVD, since it will have to be compressed enough to fit on a 4.7G DVD-R disc.
    A dangerous claim in this industry. Sony thought Beta's dominance was inevitable. They think MD/ATRAC's dominance is inevitable today. Atari thought they'd always rule the video game market. In the 50's, people thought we'd all have flying cars, robot maids and family vacations to the moon by the year 2000. Some people still think Microsoft will be able to make a secure OS if you just give them some more time.
     
  12. macrumors 68040

    shamino

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    #12
    You can wrap DRM around anything. You can DRM-protect a text file if you like. Just slap an authentication certificate on the front and encrypt the content.

    Apple could've made a DRM-wrapped version of MP3 for ITMS if they wanted to. The choice to use AAC instead was almost definitely because of the ability to get good sound at lower bitrates, not because of any technical problem with providing DRM.
     
  13. macrumors 603

    whooleytoo

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    #13
    Funny you should say this, Mac Daily News has the story that iFlicks (the video organising app) is being terminated by its developers - they've left a cryptic message on their site.

    VERY interesting timing.
     

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