For those who can follow the sign, possibilities await

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by wdlove, Sep 9, 2004.

  1. wdlove macrumors P6

    wdlove

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2002
    #1
  2. iLikeMyiMac macrumors 6502a

    iLikeMyiMac

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2004
    Location:
    St. Louis
    #2
    Anybody find the answer to Level 2 yet?
     
  3. Dr. Dastardly macrumors 65816

    Dr. Dastardly

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2004
    Location:
    I live in a giant bucket!
    #4
    God these things make me feel dumber then what I already am.
     
  4. SilentPanda Moderator emeritus

    SilentPanda

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2002
    Location:
    The Bamboo Forest
    #5
    I put the first 4 numbers in... ummm... gooogle... and I found the answer... :)
     
  5. MongoTheGeek macrumors 68040

    MongoTheGeek

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2003
    Location:
    Its not so much where you are as when you are.
    #6
    :) I guess they need a new set of problems. :)
     
  6. jrv3034 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2002
    #7
    I hear you... I took calculus in high school. And did very well. But today I couldn't solve a math problem more complex than a division of fractions if my life depended on it.

    Amazing the things that one forgets! :eek:
     
  7. OldManJimbo macrumors 6502

    OldManJimbo

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2004
    Location:
    California Coast
    #8
    So - the serious question BEGS to be asked? If we all took these courses (required) and have now forgotten nearly all of it - what was the relevant, practicial purpose for forcing them on us?

    It seems as though schools force their students to take courses they'll never need for the primary purpose of increasing the school's revenue stream.
     
  8. emw macrumors G4

    emw

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    #9
    Learning is about much more than simply memorizing formulas or archaic information. It's about developing the ability to problem-solve, and preparing us for a multitude of possible life-time tasks, none of which can really be predicted in early school years.

    I, for one, could say that much of my schooling was wasted. I graduated with a degree in Mechanical Engineering, and did engineering work for about 3 years, but eventually migrated to what is almost a completely unrelated field.

    But what I got out of my degree was the ability to apply my skills to a variety of situations, regardless of it is a math problem or a personnel issue. Education is as much about experience and personal development.

    The key, in my mind, is that education expands our ability to comprehend much more than simply what is taught. Our minds will take in quite a bit, and will discard much of what we don't use on a regular basis, but that process in and of itself is beneficial to our intellectual growth.

    As for increasing the revenue stream - I don't know about the schools you go to, but in my experience, most public education institutions (at least prior to college) are not money-making enterprises.
     
  9. OldManJimbo macrumors 6502

    OldManJimbo

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2004
    Location:
    California Coast
    #10
    I agree with your assessment of the value gained from learning to think - math is very process oriented and training your mind to follow a linear path to some conclusion is a good skill.

    On the issue of finance - schools are ALL about money. They all sell a service. Some at higher prices than others because the perceived value of a degree from one school is higher than that of another.

    They may not be profit-focused but they are most certainly funding-focused. They sell their service by the unit and require students to acquire (purchase) a certain number of units before graduating.

    Proof is in the way they handle challenged courses. You can challenge and get credit for courses not taken, but you still owe them the $$. The only thing you save is time.

    I'm not knocking education. I have been learning all my life and hope to continue doing so until I die. I also lecture for an Exectuve MBA program at a prominent SoCal university, but higher education is still a business. Plain and simple.
     
  10. wdlove thread starter macrumors P6

    wdlove

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2002
    #11
    I agree that most of education is to broaden our minds. To teach us to think critically. It is important to know where to find information and how to use that information. They teach us to make judgments. Even our life ends being a business.
     
  11. realityisterror macrumors 65816

    realityisterror

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2003
    Location:
    Snellville, GA
  12. emw macrumors G4

    emw

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    #13
    Hence my comment about "prior to college" :)

    Colleges and universities are, of course, always selling themselves and a product.

    However, my financial comment was only directed at public elementary ed, junior high, and high schools (private ones are a different story), who are always struggling for funding through the state (taxes, etc.), and although benefit in some way through increased enrollment (more tax dollars), they cannot actively recruit students.
     
  13. rainman::|:| macrumors 603

    rainman::|:|

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2002
    Location:
    iowa
    #14
    they've been running ads in the monthly Mensa magazine as well, and the most recent one actually includes a detachable paper test that can be mailed in to Google Labs. Very cool, IMHO. Unfortunately I'm so bad at math that i don't even want to look at the damn questions...

    paul
     
  14. evoluzione macrumors 68010

    evoluzione

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2002
    Location:
    down the road, that's where i'll always be
    #15



    Abstract has the answer...that's where you get sent to when you log in and enter the number 5966290435 as the password :)
     

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