Free Pascal 2.0

Discussion in 'Mac Programming' started by Kerry Sanders, May 17, 2005.

  1. macrumors regular

    Kerry Sanders

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2005
    Location:
    Hayden, AL
    #1
    Just heard on the Slashdot Review podcast that Free Pascal 2.0 is now available. With this release, it supports the Mac OS X platform. This is pretty interesting for an old Delphi developer from a long time back. :)

    http://www.freepascal.org
     
  2. macrumors 68000

    Eniregnat

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2003
    Location:
    In your head.
    #2
    Wow, this brings me back to the first days of programming. When I was a kid we progressed through LOGO, BASIC, Pacall, and then MLX. Cool. I am going to stick with DreamCard though.

    What a great teaching tool, and perhaps a pratical development tool for legacy systems.
     
  3. Guest

    caveman_uk

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2003
    Location:
    Hitchin, Herts, UK
    #3
    Me too! I did a ton of programming on Pascal in my CS A-level and my Uni subsidiary courses - as well as COBOL (I am that old) and x86 assembler. I had a look at Delphi but it seemed a bit too contrived for my liking and C++ made my head hurt. My Cocoa/Obj-C is coming along nicely at the moment though.
     
  4. macrumors 6502a

    snkTab

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2004
    Location:
    Cincinnati, OH
    #4
    Hehe cool, think I'm going play around with this for a bit before realizing I could be reading Macrumors instead.

    Pascal had charm, I always thought it was a more... pleasing language than c.
     
  5. macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2004
    Location:
    Belfast, Northern Ireland
    #5
    haha, pascal was great! it was the language used to teach me the main fundementals of programming! its one of the most enjoyable languages that i've used so far! i loved all those dos text based interfaces! i can't remember the name of the program, but i used to program pascal on an apple mac lc. the good old days! (about 5yrs ago! haha)

    i did cobol in uni last year, it annoyed me so much, tedious and hard to read! the lecturer used to always mention every lecture how cobol in not a dead language! hmm... should i believe him?

    i think i'll download it too for a wee looksee and a tinker!
     
  6. Guest

    caveman_uk

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2003
    Location:
    Hitchin, Herts, UK
    #6
    My Latin teacher used to say that about Latin. It was BS :D

    Seriously though, I heard that people that knew COBOL were getting big money around the time of the Y2K bug as the main bank's had really old systems that still used COBOL and they wanted them checked/fixed. Dunno if it's true but it's what I heard....sadly well after the Y2K rollover :(
     
  7. macrumors 6502a

    snkTab

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2004
    Location:
    Cincinnati, OH
    #7
    I agree,

    We have programmers for common languages... they get paid crap. And then we have programmers for legacy systems. They get paid *BAM*.

    Knowing the uncommon languages can be beneficial sometimes, especially since programmers have a nice turnover rate.
     
  8. macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2004
    Location:
    Belfast, Northern Ireland
    #8
    haha! nice one!

    i remember hearing about the millenium bug testers sitting in over the new year just watching and waiting for the 'big bang' to happen getting paid £800+ p/h! haha! classic!
     
  9. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2007
    #9
    eh.. what are you guys on

    First, great post!

    But to the rest of you, .. you clearly have no idea what has happened to pascal the past 10, 15 years. This is no longer your fathers pascal.

    FPC is basically a Delphi clone, one of the most successfull development systems for windows. Unrivaled even by C++ the last 10 years. Delphi is 100% object oriented, it produces real exe files (not runtime files like java or basic P code). I have worked as a delphi developer for the past 9 years and still make a good living from it. Delphi is responsible for more software development than C++ on windows. Delphi can compile for .net as well, so you dont miss much once you have learned Delphi.

    You can also like to C libraries, compile your own dll and lib files (for use by C coders or any language that can load library files). Everything C/C++, .net and Java have - Delphi has.

    I recently bought a mac, but i findmyself stupified by how tiredsome and awkward the development cycle is for this platform. I am already converting the C headers to pascal so i can get started in freepascal.

    Next time, check before you talk down about a language. If mac had a decent Delphi clone - you would double the production of software over night for the mac platform. So i hope and pray Borland will jump on the bandwagon as soon as the 64bit native compiler is done for vista.
     
  10. Moderator emeritus

    kainjow

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2000
    #10
    Old too ;)

    How so? Examples would be nice.

    If that were to bring more business, engineering, and medical software, I'm all for it. But if it were to bring more text editors and audio players, no thanks :).
     
  11. macrumors 68040

    iSee

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2004
    #11
    Definitely not what *you're* on...

    Ah, I think you drank too much Delphi-flavored cool-aid :)
    I really don't think Delphi rivals C++ or C#...

    http://www.tiobe.com/tpci.htm

    Ouch, look at all those red arrows pointing down...

    Edit: wait a sec, the OP is from 2005! I guess the production of software has been doubled for a couple of years now...
     
  12. macrumors 68040

    iSee

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2004
    #12
    Personally, I'm looking for more audio editors and text players
     
  13. macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #13
    I just checked and wow. It's still here on my bookshelf "Pascal User Manual and Report" by Jensen and Wirth.

    This was the first Pascal book. My edition was printed 1976 It still has the price tag on it $6.95 It was an expensive book being that it was from Springer-Verlag

    We used Wirth's compiler, the one written at ETH Zurich it ran on (of all things) a CDC 6600 mainframe.

    I think this book, like the Algol 60 book before it should serve as a model of how to write a book that defines a programming language. It is very thin and to the point and easy to read with both examples and a formal definition.

    Later I did quite a bit of work using Ada, kind of a grown up Pascal.
     

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