Full burn-in testing?

Discussion in 'General Mac Discussion' started by alexf, Aug 14, 2004.

  1. alexf macrumors 6502a

    alexf

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2004
    Location:
    Planet Earth
    #1
    Hi everyone,

    Just a quick miscellaneous question:

    In the Apple Store specials section, when explaining the refurbishment process, it states:

    Each Apple Certified Reconditioned Product is fully tested (including full burn-in testing)

    Just what is "full burn-in testing?"

    Thanks :)
     
  2. oingoboingo macrumors 6502a

    oingoboingo

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2003
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #2
    Basically they try and set fire to the Macintosh. If it survives the ignition process, the char marks are wiped off, and the machine is ready for sale. Burn-in testing of the original NeXT computers from Steve Jobs' previous company was a little hazardous, as the cases were made from a magnesium alloy, and spectacular amounts of heat and light could often be seen surging from NeXT dealerships around 'burn-in' testing time.

    Seriously, burn-in testing is just a process of running a machine for something like a 12 or 24-hour period, often while running some type of software which stresses the various components, ie: something with heavy CPU, RAM, video and hard drive access. The idea is that if a particular component is going to fail soon, 24 hours of being pushed hard will tip that component over the edge, and it can be replaced before selling to the customer. So if the refurb comes back from the customer with, say, a cooling fan or hard drive which is on its last legs, it will hopefully be picked up by running it at 100% power/utilisation for 24 hours. Burn-in testing is a very common way of testing new computers also, not just refurbs.
     
  3. alexf thread starter macrumors 6502a

    alexf

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2004
    Location:
    Planet Earth
    #3
    Thanks for your response...

    I have to wonder: is this good for the computer? I don't know about you, but in my own work I try to avoid stressing the computer to this extent... :confused:
     
  4. 7on macrumors 601

    7on

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2003
    Location:
    Dress Rosa
    #4
    It's ok, unless cooling is wrong or off on the CPU. Which these tests can find out too. The roughest thing that's done to a computer is the initial startup. Running 24hrs @ 100% CPU is like a walk in the park.
     
  5. jane doe macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    #5
    They run diagnostic tests to make sure that everything passes the initial tests.
     
  6. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

    Joined:
    May 19, 2002
    #6
    Actually it's not any more, maybe at some of the small custom PC shops. But not at the factories anymore.

    These days they just get the smoke test, and a boot test and they're boxed and shipped.

    The old pictures of the burn-in racks at the Mac factories were sort of neat, but now there are stacks of boxes at the end on the assembly line.
     
  7. jane doe macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    #7
    They do still run burn in tests in the manufacturing plants for new computers, each company may do it differently but its still done.
     
  8. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

    Joined:
    May 19, 2002
    #8
    If you can find me any major computer factory that runs a machine for 12 or 24-hour period, I'd like to see it.

    They test the computers these days, and call it burn in.
     
  9. jane doe macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    #9
    Apple burns in the computers with a number of tests. I'm not sure about the length of time its run, but they have several tests that are run before shipping out.
     
  10. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

    Joined:
    May 19, 2002
    #10
    Dell is probably "testing" for a couple hours, don't know how long Hon Hai (a main Apple Computer sub-contractor) runs their tests for.

    While the mom and pop PC makers will probably run the machines for 2 or 3 days -- actually burning them in -- before releasing it to the customer.

    Apple's switch to the testing from the extended burn-in (back when they had their own factories) really bumped up the number of DOAs and hardware failure in the first few days.

    ---

    So basically smoke test em, and see if they boot, then kick them out the door.
     
  11. alexf thread starter macrumors 6502a

    alexf

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2004
    Location:
    Planet Earth
    #11
    By the way, why are they called "burn-in" tests anyway? It makes me almost hesitant to buy a computer that has been "burned-in..."
     
  12. Brother Michael macrumors 6502a

    Brother Michael

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2004
    #12
    So that's what that really large spot of missing finishing on my iBook lid is from...

    Mike
     

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