Full Sail College

Discussion in 'Community' started by scem0, Oct 20, 2004.

  1. scem0 macrumors 604

    scem0

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    Location:
    back in NYC!
    #1
    I hate making threads about stuff like this, but picking a college is a very important decision and I want everyone's input.

    Right now my #1 pick is Full Sail in Florida (website). Does anyone attend this school? Has anyone graduated from this school? If so, what do you think about it?

    I ask this because a recent PM I got from a MR member has really turned me off of the Art Institute of California at SF, and it looked really good prior to this PM.

    So, I'm looking for current students, alumni, or anyone who knows anything about Full Sail, and if they think it is a good college.

    Other colleges I'm looking at (feel free to comment on these too):
    -College of Advancing Technology (Tempe, Arizona)
    -AI of Cal at SF (but I'm very hesitant of this school after the PM, so it's almost out of the running)
    -Emerson College

    So, if anyone could tell me if any of these colleges, but mainly Full Sail, are bad colleges, then please do so :).

    Thanks so much,

    scem0
     
  2. blackfox macrumors 65816

    blackfox

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2003
    Location:
    PDX
    #2
    Scemo, what are you going to be studying exactly? I know that UT@Austin is a pretty good school for a variety of subjects, by virtue of it's size (although that is also a drawback, I admit).

    As someone who went to several AI around the country, I have a strong suggestion:

    Since many of these AI schools concentrate on traditional classes (English, Math etc) as well as specialized classes relevant to your degree program to give you a full degree, I would strongly suggest going to a normal, cheaper school to get those regular class credits out of the way and then transfer to your specialized school of choice.

    If the schools you are looking at are anything like my experiences, you will not get into very specialized, technical classes until midway through your second year, and will be paying out the nose for classes you could take anywhere for much cheaper.

    I would suggest going to a regular college for at least a year, getting requirements out of the way and taking classes that are offered that tend toward what you want to do. Then transfer to your college of choice and get on with things. With the money you save you could buy yourself a new G5 (or G6 by then) to take with you. Just research the transferability of credits between the schools before hand.

    With UT and even ACC in Austin, there are a wide variety of classes to be taken on the cheap.

    FWIW
     
  3. JesseJames macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2003
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    How'd I get here? How can I leave?
    #3
    In this economy, you are better off going to Clown College.
    Does Ringling Bros. Barnum and Bailey offer good 401k?
     
  4. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    Gone but not forgotten.
    #4
    Full Sail is about 10 minutes from me. I've known a few people to attend, including someone who is interning near Philadelphia, PA right now.

    It's expensive. You get a lot of hands on training. The industry loves the school. Your credits don't mean a whole lot to the educational community, in general. You pay for good equipment and they have it. A lot of it might even be better than where you'll end up working. The school goes pretty much 24 hours a day.
     
  5. cpjakes macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2003
    Location:
    Buffalo, NY
    #5
    scem0,

    Full Sail is a great place and as mentioned is also loved by the industry. The training provided there is great. Had I known I was going to be in music technology I would have looked there before going to college, but I didn't know that until after I spent a few years in college and decided to finish.

    There are a lot of places that offer this training, but you have to look at it in a couple of ways. First, think about it academically. Will you get (and more specifically do you want) a bachelor's degree or a certificate program? Are you interested in post graduate work?

    Technical schools offer a lot of great things - excellent equipment, a highly specialized course of study, and people who know what they're talking about. But, they may also be too specialized. If you aren't sure what you want to do, there isn't much of a way out without quitting. At least if you find a program that is within a college or university, there are other things you might be interested in. But if it's audio engineering you want, that's what you'll get at these places.

    I think I have a list somewhere of the audio schools and what their certifications/degrees/general courses of study are. If I can find it, I'll send it your way so you can see the options. I think there is also one at the AES website. The Audio Engineering Society is a good thing to check out if you haven't already.

    Good luck!
    cpjakes
     
  6. agreenster macrumors 68000

    agreenster

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2001
    Location:
    Walt Disney Animation Studios
    #6
    OT: But Ringling School of Art and Design is one of (if not the) most respected animation schoosl in the country

    My cousin and his wife both go to FS. Music design and film (resp.)

    I've heard good things about FS, but dont forget that school is only as good as what you put into it

    Academy of Art College in SF is where a lot of Pixar folk went to school...
     
  7. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2002
    Location:
    toronto
    #7
    whenever full sail or just about any audio school was ever brought up at the old prosoundweb, it was widely ridiculed.

    scem, if you're going into audio, either pick up an internship or spend your money on opening your own studio. it'll end up getting your further ahead.
     
  8. Jovian9 macrumors 68000

    Jovian9

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Planet Zebes
    #8
    I looked into Full Sail and have lots of brochures from them (if you request them you'll keep getting them for years). From everything I read it seems like a great place to go.
    I was actually supposed to attend the Academy of Art in S.F. before my wife decided to do her Masters Degree at I.U. Since I ended up not going I started looking for other schools (that were not as expensive as the Academy of Art) and Full Sail was one of them I became very interested in. If I had not decided on going to The New York Film Academy (1 year from now....can't wait) I would have chosen Full Sail.
     
  9. scem0 thread starter macrumors 604

    scem0

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    Location:
    back in NYC!
    #9
    I want to go into some kind of creative tech job.

    If you asked me a day ago, I would have said web design, but there isn't enough money in web design, and after looking at the projects made by Full Sail students, I think I'd rather do motion media (but it's the same major, so I could do either).

    Take, for example, this movie made by a Full Sail student. Couldn't you see that on TV? I most definitely could. I would love to make something like that, and I think I would be pretty good at it.

    So, I'm really liking Full Sail right now. The Digital Media major looks awesome.

    scem0
     
  10. LeeTom macrumors 68000

    LeeTom

    Joined:
    May 31, 2004
    #10
    Not enough money in web design?
    I don't know about your expenses, but the $100/hour I charge for it isn't all that bad!

    Lee Tom
     
  11. pseudobrit macrumors 68040

    pseudobrit

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Jobs' Spare Liver Jar
    #11
    I'll give you one piece of advice. A degree from a standard university is so much more flexible.

    If you focus on web design in an expensive tech school, what happens in 20 years when the industry is totally changed from what it is today?

    Twenty years ago, a DOS tech programme would probably have looked like a solid lead on a career path.
     
  12. scem0 thread starter macrumors 604

    scem0

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    Location:
    back in NYC!
    #12
    I obviously have very high standards ;). JK. I'd be very happy to make $100/hour, but as the poster above states, there may not be that much life left in web design (as we know it). I say 'as we know it' because people will need pages for years and years and years. But in 20 years, templates could be the next big thing. Or maybe WYSIWYG editors that are simple enough for the average small business owner.

    And, just to satisfy my curiosity, do you make web sites for small businesses?

    And with a digital media major from Full sail, a web design career will always be an option, but I could also do commercials for small businesses (I think I'd start a "get rid of 'we wanna save you money'" campaign. I despise those commercials). I could do still advertising, newspaper ads, telephone book ads, or what have you.

    I think this major could provide me with the skills to do a wide spectrum of jobs, which is a major plus.

    Thanks for all the feedback everyone.

    scem0
     
  13. pseudobrit macrumors 68040

    pseudobrit

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Jobs' Spare Liver Jar
    #13
    I'm saddened that higher education has degraded into a clearinghouse for skill sets.

    Do you want training or do you want intelligence?

    Do you just want a better job or do you want a chance to be brilliant?

    Sorry, I'm having a Steve moment (which happens to be my name, too).
     
  14. Applexilef macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2004
    #14
    I live close to this school. Everyone that goes there has pink/blue/neon green hair and a lame anime shirt.

    Annoying...
     
  15. jtgotsjets macrumors 6502

    jtgotsjets

    Joined:
    May 20, 2004
    Location:
    Lawrence, KS
    #15
    what was so bad about AI of Cali in SF?
    one person's opinion doesn't seem like a lot to go off of for something as important as college.
     
  16. apple2991 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 20, 2004
    #16
    I live quite near Full Sail and considered going there myself, until my best friend who recently graduated turned me off from it.

    From what I learned about it by talking to various graduates etc.: the equipment is good and the facilities are expensive. However, so is tuition. As in tens of thousands of dollars. Which isn't really all THAT much for college these days, but being a private institution it's a lot harder to get scholarships. If you want training but not real education, Full Sail might suit you. If you ever plan on getting into academia, higher education, or anything above the purely technical side of things (which believe me, you will, one can only be lowly sound technician for so long) then it might not suit you. The fast paced education at Full Sail (because it was created to make money) gives you plenty of hands on experience, but doesnt really teach you to adapt to a marketplace or with changing technologies in the future. Companies, unless looking for a very specific position to fill, often look more toward a well-rounded college graduate. Also, if you want any sort of college experience, it is definitely NOT for you. It is a lot of school all at once, and the campus is like a business. There are very few fun college parties, campus experiences, friends bonding (which may not seem important now, but is actually a great experience for many people) because there is no real "campus" and everyone is trying to get out as quickly as they can.

    That's what I can tell you about the school. What I can tell you about Orlando is that it is a nasty place, and I wish we could curse on this forum. Seriously, it is a really bad place to live. That is unless you like urban sprawl, plenty of impoverished and/or ugly buildings, no trees, and absolutely no soul or culture. It just lacks feeling and the sun is hotter than hell.

    Link
     
  17. msbsound macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    Location:
    Charlotte, NC
    #17
    Full Sail

    Working in the industry and speaking with many other professionals, this is my read on Full Sail:

    1)It is way over priced for what it is.
    2)They have a lot of gear and will train you accordingly, and it does give you a base knowledge that is transferable to most of the audio industry.
    3) You will almost definetely still have to intern in whatever field you go into, where you will repeat a lot the same stuff you learned at Full Sail.
    4) General joke(although not true) is theat full sail is great at putting out roadies who sweep the stage once the show is done.

    So in closing, if you have money to burn, zero knowledge(in other words, never seen a mic/cable/mixer) and you are early in your career, it "may" be worth it. But look long and hard at other options, including more traditional schools as well as internships as they may give you a broader base to start from.

    Just my 2 cents...
     
  18. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2002
    Location:
    toronto
    #18
    a friend once said of Columbia College (in chicago) : you get out of it what you put into it.

    i took a few classes and saw what she saw, which was people who were skating by, picking up few skills and not networking, and go-getters who would take full advantage of the available equipment, faculty and other students, working on their own productions or making the class assignments above and beyond most others.

    and, last i checked, tuition was about $13k / yr.

    i think the same applies to full sail et. al., especially wrt audio. if a student is one of the lazy ones, no amount of schooling will make them a valuable part of their field. for those who are the go-getters, i and others believe they should spend their time and energies either getting an internship off the bat, or using their tuition money to buy equipment so they can do their own projects. (and i'm mostly talking about audio here)

    what i just said is also the gist of what a lot of the engineers over at prosoundweb expressed. they preferred fresh meat to those who actually graduated from an audio school, because they always had to untrain them before making them useful.
     
  19. OnceUGoMac macrumors 6502a

    OnceUGoMac

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2004
    #19
    My ex went to full sail for film and I go to Columbia College Chicago for film. She wishes that she had gone here instead. After finishing full sail, she can only start off as a P.A. The Columbia grads that I've known have started off in the cinematography dept. Quite a difference. Since full sail's not as in depth and more of a trade school. Columbia College is considered the best undergraduate film school in the country. It is a college, so you get a degree. Plus, you can specialize in an area, i.e. I'm focusing on producing. go to http://www.colum.edu to check it out.
     
  20. 2A Batterie macrumors 6502a

    2A Batterie

    Joined:
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    Out of a Suitcase, USA
    #20
    I'm too lazy to read through all of this post so sorry if this is repeated. I'm a musician and went to a conservatory to study performance, and also minored in music technology. I've checked out Full Sail and it is a great place. Especially with recording technology (this can apply to film and graphics too) you never really grasp the materially fully until you apply it. In other words, I sat in recording classes all day but never really grasped everything completely until I recorded my own band in the studio by myself over Christmas. This is where I learned most of my stuff. The class gave me all the info, but doing it really helped. At Full Sail, you probably will get a good amount of "flight time" which is invaluable.
    Even more important though, is the theory that you aren't paying all of that money to get skills and a piece of paper, you are paying for someone to make a "phone call" for you one day... or in other words, connections. In so many walks of life, it is who you know that can get you places. You can make tons of connections at Full Sail, which has a national rep and many powerful folks attending/teaching/doing clinics/ or just passing through. Of course none of this matters if you don't work at your technicall skills along with the networking idea. Drop me a PM if you have any questions.
    Also keep in mind, everything is what you make of it. If you're at Big Shot U or Podunk College, you shape your future. Some folk complain about Full Sail (cost, not enough time, don't do enough for students) but all that matters is what you do, wherever you chose to do it.
     
  21. apple2991 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 20, 2004
    #21
    Actually, one of the problems with Full Sail is that it DOESN'T get you connections. Most of the teachers have little or no connection to any form of high powered execs at media companies, and many have never even worked in the industry. Very few currently do.

    I mean, Orlando is SUCH a hotbed of film and music...oh, wait. Plus, since Full Sail packs so many classes and so much info into one day (since you have to be out in 13 months) you wouldn't have much time to make connections even if you could.

    Most, although not all, of the things I have heard about Full Sail's job placement program are that it is bullcrap. Seriously, how do you think a department could possibly find jobs for every student of a graduating class, keeping individual tabs on everybody? Additionally, do you think some film or music studio is going to even return the phone call of some school job rep? For what, to hire some kid with absolutely no theoretical base in the matierial he is supposedly fluent in, with absolutely no experience in the industry at all, and who made no connections because real filmmakers etc. go to real schools? Don't think so.
     
  22. scem0 thread starter macrumors 604

    scem0

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    Location:
    back in NYC!
    #22
    Well, no matter where I go, I plan on making connections with or without the school :cool:.

    And I'm not planning on going to the film school or audio school at FS, I want to be in the digital media major. Yeah, i've heard about people not getting jobs in those two departments and become PA's and such, but I don't really care about those departments. I plan on working for myself after graduating, calling small businesses up, and asking if they need a website, a print ad, a brochure, or a TV commercial done for them. If so, I'll point them to my online portfolio, and hopefully they will respond positively.

    That's my tentative plan. However, that plan would work at any school. I just think I'd learn the more than the other schools I've been looking at if I go to Full Sail. Plus, if I do a 4 year degree, much of what I learn freshman year will be old stuff, so the 2 year thing is benificial. I can get into the work force sooner, too.

    Thanks,

    scem0
     
  23. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2002
    Location:
    toronto
    #23
    your portfolio is all that matters. no one is going to give a rat's ass where you went to school. so, you should do whatever is going to provide you your strongest portfolio. if dropping $10+k / yr at school will do it, so be it. if you can spend that money on other things (like your own gear, or a piece of property where you can create, or a classical education) and create a strong portfolio, then you should do that.

    bottom line: if you can self-motivate, i say don't bother w/ the trade school.
     
  24. blackfox macrumors 65816

    blackfox

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2003
    Location:
    PDX
    #24
    scem0, to distill my own advice of earlier and the excellent advice of others, I would suggest:

    1. Stay in Austin for a while. There are excellent classes available at both ACC and UT which are both relevant and helpful to what you are doing. They will also be cheap. The Austin scene is very tech- and art- orientated, and Austin is a great town to network in. If you are looking for experience and networking (not so much cash), there are no shortage of bands, clubs or otherwise who would easily allow you to provide them with a service, to benefit you both, provided you can demonstrate some level of competence and creativity. Check out and possibly submit to AMODA, which is an excellent venue for Digital Art. Volunteer or visit CinemaTexas, which is a great thing, full of great people. I say this, because it is what I did. I do not regret it, it was educational and a lot of fun. I particularily liked doing video projection/VJ for bands at local clubs, it aided in a lot of skill developments and I got some hot dates as well...

    2. If you feel like you need to go to a technical/specialized school, do so after you already have a couple years of schooling under your belt at a traditional college. It is cheaper and you will not miss anything. Work on your skills/portfolio on your own time, or in concert with classes offered at traditional Universities. Perhaps take some of these savings and buy some equipment.

    3. If you do go to a Technical school, many of the classes are great and offer excellent equipment, but it is on you as the student to rise to the challenge of getting the most out of it. Look for and apply for all Internships that interest you. This can often be one of the strengths of such a school, and at the very least the Internship will give you experience in the field (even if it is getting coffee) and help with your overall resume.

    4. The portfolio is most important consideration, and choose avenues that will help you acheive the best possible. If you are a self-starter, you do not necessarily need a specialized school, although it is nice to have on a resume and may help you get feedback on your skills by peers. Visit all the prospective campuses and talk to students and teachers alike.

    Personally, I would just go to a regular University for now. You would receive a traditional education and depending on student-aid or other Financial considerations, your schedule should be light enough to accomodate work on you portfolio. If at some point you decide that DIgital Media is not for you, you will still have a regular College degree to fall back on.

    Regardless of what you decide, good luck.
     
  25. themadchemist macrumors 68030

    themadchemist

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2003
    Location:
    Chi Town
    #25
    While Full Sail's Associate Degree program is accredited, I'm not so sure about its Bachelor's Degree. In general, a non-accredited degree is absolutely worthless.
     

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