Full vs. Semi Fisheye

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by tuartboy, Sep 30, 2006.

  1. tuartboy macrumors 6502a

    tuartboy

    Joined:
    May 10, 2005
    #1
    As a photographer who has never dabbled in fisheye, I have no idea how to answer a friend's question. She is interested in purchasing a fisheye lense and wishes to know the difference between a "full" and a "semi" fisheye lense.

    I found some stuff about frame coverage and circular vs. full, but I'm still not sure if it is an adequate answer.
     
  2. iGary Guest

    iGary

    Joined:
    May 26, 2004
    Location:
    Randy's House
    #2
    Semi-Fisheye?

    There are semi-circular fisheye adapters.

    Maybe she is talking full-frame?

    There are circular fisheyes, rectangular fisheyes, and circular full frame fisheyes (might have one of those wrong).

    Here's a circular fisheye shot:

    [​IMG]

    All fisheye images can be re-maped to look "flat" with software like so:

    [​IMG]
     

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  3. tuartboy thread starter macrumors 6502a

    tuartboy

    Joined:
    May 10, 2005
    #3
    From the information I have found, it looks like I have seen the 2 circular types. How is the full-frame rectangular different from the circular types (design, results, etc...)?
     
  4. iGary Guest

    iGary

    Joined:
    May 26, 2004
    Location:
    Randy's House
    #4
    The full frame does not have the cropped circular edges like the circular fisheye does - it covers the whole frame without the circle:

    [​IMG]


    A cicular is cropped like mine is above (Sigma 8mm):

    [​IMG]


    Did she tell you what she wanted to use it for?
     
  5. tuartboy thread starter macrumors 6502a

    tuartboy

    Joined:
    May 10, 2005
    #5
    Nope.

    Well, it appears to be pretty straightforward. I'll just shoot her off to the wikipedia page on fisheyes and tell her there isn't really a "semi" lense and that should be fine.

    Thanks for the help iGary.
     
  6. Mike Teezie macrumors 68020

    Mike Teezie

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2002
    #6
    I can tell you the little I know, I don't have a lot of experience with fish eye lenses.

    On a 5D, the 15mm Canon fisheye is great. But on any 1.6 crop body, the effect is drastically less pronounced. I was blown away by the difference in the full frame versus the crop, the crop camera just looked like it had a pretty wide lens on it. Not much fisheye effect at all.
     
  7. sjl macrumors 6502

    sjl

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2004
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #7
    Funny you say that. I know somebody who, this time last year, had a 20D and the Canon fisheye (amongst other things). I was a little surprised - for my money, if I had a fisheye, I'd be buying a full frame body to use it properly. A crop body - yes, even the 1D series - is a waste of the fisheye, in my opinion.

    He bought a 5D a few months ago. I think he's a bit happier with the fisheye now. :D

    and yes, a fisheye on a 5D is one of the things I'd like, but it's low on the list. Starting to think that I'll save my pennies for the 24-105 f/4L, then follow that up with the 17-40, and finally the 5D. "If I were a rich man ..." :eek:
     
  8. cookie1105 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2006
    Location:
    London, UK
    #8
    This is a fisheye picture from a 1.6x body. If you have any from a 1.3x or full frame body, please post them. I'd be really interested to see the difference in pictures rather than just numbers.

    1.6x
    [​IMG]
     
  9. brett33 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2004
    Location:
    Waco, TX
    #9
    I believe that the circular fisheye gives a full 180 degree field of view all the way around, whereas the rectangular fisheye gives a diagonal 180 degree field of view. Something along those lines anyway.

    I have a Sigma 8mm, it's a great lens for what it does, but the uses are relatively limited.
     

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