Fun with Education Discount

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by evanrousso, Nov 19, 2006.

  1. evanrousso macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2006
    #1
    When I ordered my macbook from the apple online store I noticed something interesting. When I put in for the Education discount it never asked me for a student ID number or anything like that. All it asked was that I choose which school I go to and that was it.

    I was planning to get an iMac before I graduate in December, but if all you have to do is pick a school and you get the discount anyways...whats to stop someone from using the student discount even when they are not a student?
     
  2. WildCowboy Administrator/Editor

    WildCowboy

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    #2
    Apple does random audits of people purchasing through the EDU stores.
     
  3. adrianblaine macrumors 65816

    adrianblaine

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    #3
    I don't remember since it was so long ago, but it seems like when you have to sign up for an Apple Account with the educational discount it will only let you if you have a .EDU email address. You can put stuff in your cart all you want, but when you check out you have to sign in.

    Or I could just be completely wrong and I'm thinking of buying plane tickets through Student Universe :).
     
  4. CanadaRAM macrumors G5

    CanadaRAM

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    #4
    Umm, yeah that's not Apple.

    When you purchase, however, you are asseting in the purchase contract that you meet the terms and conditions for the special education offer, and if you knowingly falsify that information, you 1) have to live with that and 2) Apple if they find out has grounds to void the purchase contract with you.
     
  5. xfiftyfour macrumors 68030

    xfiftyfour

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    #5
    Basically, nothing is stopping non students from using the student discount, other than the off-chance possibility that Apple may request verification (they do this randomly and far between, from what I've read of it). I guess it's a bit of the honor code.. for which many give a fat finger to.

    I'm sure, though, that if Apple wanted to they could put something in place to prevent the fraud. Obviously they're still making enough on edu pricing where it wouldn't be worth it to spend the time/energy/resources to put up any blocks.
     
  6. evanrousso thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Aug 28, 2006
    #6
    If they were to request verification after the product is already in my possession it would seem kind pointless. It is Apple's responsibility to have some sort of verification system set in place before the fact rather than bother the customer with sending in verification after the fact.

    I don't care what they say at Apple, they would still have to honor the warranty and any other agreements on their end.
     
  7. R.Youden macrumors 68020

    R.Youden

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    #7
    I know in the Uk for some education discounts (the larger of the two) you have to connect via a computer on the university network.
     
  8. WildCowboy Administrator/Editor

    WildCowboy

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    #8
    They don't have to verify beforehand...you agree to a binding contract stating that you are eligible. If they find out that you misrepresented yourself, they are able to take you to court if necessary to recover any funds they are owed. They don't usually have to go that far, but they are within their rights to do it.
     
  9. coachingguy macrumors 6502a

    coachingguy

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    #9
    It happened to me...

    As a teacher, I update my hardware about every two years and I've purchased a few iPods etc... The first time I ordered through the education store, I think it was a PM6500 or a G3 B/W 300 (So it was awhile ago:D ), I had to fax in proof of employment of the school district. I've ordered many times since and have never had to do it since.

    Coachingguy
     
  10. daneoni macrumors G4

    daneoni

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    Mar 24, 2006
    #10
    However, if you buy from the edu store and you're not a student, karma is gonna bite you on the ass and plague your MBP will all the issues documented so far all at once. Haha.
     
  11. adrianblaine macrumors 65816

    adrianblaine

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    #11
    I agree with WildCowboy, if you agreed to the contract on your end and you don't meet the terms and conditions, Apple has no obligation to do anything for you.
     
  12. student_trap macrumors 68000

    student_trap

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    'Ol Smokey, UK
    #12
    in the uk, the highest dsicount you can get is if you are at uni, and to get that, you have to be on the uni network
     
  13. evanrousso thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #13
    I don't believe that I agreed to any such contract when I ordered my macbook?
     
  14. macdaddy121 macrumors 6502a

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    #14
    Nothing.....except....your conscious.....
     
  15. xfiftyfour macrumors 68030

    xfiftyfour

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    #15
    Yes you did.
     
  16. WildCowboy Administrator/Editor

    WildCowboy

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    #16
    It's in the terms and conditions for the educational store. Purchasing through the store indicates your agreement with those terms.
     
  17. TequilaBoobs macrumors 6502a

    TequilaBoobs

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    #17
    im sure he is conscious, but its his conscience that i think u meant?
     
  18. adrianblaine macrumors 65816

    adrianblaine

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    #18
    Yes you did, you just must not remember. You have to agree to this to enter the Educational discount store.
     

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  19. cecildk9999 macrumors regular

    cecildk9999

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    Sep 10, 2006
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    East Coast
    #19
    I'm guessing that if you're a regular purchaser through the edu store, Apple may look into your credentials, but they may just let it go if a purchase happens few and far between time-wise. I'm excited that I'll always have undisputed access to the edu store since I'm going into teaching (unless Apple changes their policies) :p
     
  20. tdhurst macrumors 68040

    tdhurst

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    Dec 27, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #20
    Yeah!

    Yeah, f&$% for trying to verify student status! Screw them and their discounts!


    /sarcasm
     
  21. CanadaRAM macrumors G5

    CanadaRAM

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    On the Left Coast - Victoria BC Canada
    #21
    That's where you are wrong. Falsifying the information on the contract is grounds for voiding the contract -- and a voided contract includes nullifying any obligation to warranty or service delivery.

    Where do you get the idea that "I can break the agreement I made, but you (Apple) must keep all the agreements on your side of the contract"?
     
  22. jessep28 macrumors 6502

    jessep28

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    Sep 8, 2006
    Location:
    Omaha, NE
    #22
    CanadaRAM is right. Apple relied to their determent on the fact that you said you were a student if in fact you weren’t. They used that reliance in giving a discount. If you purchased in the EDU store and were not a student then you have committed fraud.

    Clicking on "I AGREE" constitutes a binding agreement.

    Now if Apple discovered the fraud, that contract (purchase) could be voided at their discretion. Then in common law, the two parties will have to be placed on the same ground as before the purchase. Which means surrendering of the items you bought plus depreciation costs. Also, I'm sure since there was detrimental reliance that resulted in fraud, they can sue for damages.

    I might just dust off the old Business Law book and look it up, but I'm pretty sure.

    But in all reality, as has been stated before, the likelihood of that happening is remote - there are simply too many buyers. But still in the whole sense you are defrauding Apple by saying you are what you aren't.
     

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