G5 processor IMB - Motorola

Discussion in 'Community' started by Macintel, Apr 23, 2004.

  1. Macintel macrumors newbie

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    Philadelphia
    #1
    I and a friend had a dispute about who makes the G5 processor. I told him at present IBM makes the G5, he says Motorola. I informed him that Motorola did in the pass, but at present no longer makes processors for Apple. Right?
     
  2. aswitcher macrumors 603

    aswitcher

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  3. crenz macrumors 6502a

    crenz

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  4. Dippo macrumors 65816

    Dippo

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    #4

    Motorola was supposed to make the G5, but they never did.
     
  5. applemacdude macrumors 68040

    applemacdude

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  6. mgargan1 macrumors 65816

    mgargan1

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    #6
    This is quoted from Geek.com's processor spec site... "IBM also produces G4 processors. Motorola had some problems producing G4 processors that ran at 500MHz. The problems were worked out, but by that time, Apple enlisted IBM to produce G4 processors." if you wanna check it out for yourself... go here... Processor Specs

    Also has G5, G4, Athlons, P4's, P3's etc...
     
  7. strider42 macrumors 65816

    strider42

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2002
    #7
    I believe Motorola does make a G5 chip, the 85xx series, but G5 is an internal code name, and refers to processors for the embedded market. Motorola does not make apple's G5's, IBM does most assuradely. They are the PPC 970 series chips, whcih IBM is also using in its own blade servers now. IBM also produced the G3 chips, at least the later ones. Motorola did as well, and the G4 used by apple was produced by Moto as well.
     
  8. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

    Joined:
    May 19, 2002
    #8
    Nope the G4 included altivec, which IBM didn't start using until the G5 -- it was the G3s which IBM/Motorola each had a variant.

    The last real thing IBM/Motorola worked on together was the e-Book PPC architecture, don't know which part numbers they are.

    And yes Motorola adopted Apple's generation naming scheme, and also canceled a G5 chip Apple wanted to use (year old rumor that was likely the 7457-RM).
     
  9. Koodauw macrumors 68040

    Koodauw

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    #9
    I could of sworn that the iBooks used an IBM G4. Thats why the clock speeds were always different than the PowerBooks. Maybe someone can comfirm/ prove me wrong on this.
     
  10. saabmp3 macrumors 6502a

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    Tacoma, WA
    #10
    For the most part, Motorola made all the G4 processors (except for a couple rare breeds). The newest G3 "Sahara" chips in the iBook G3's were in fact made by IBM, but only the latest revisions. These G3 chips were basically G4's without Altivec (which I think was patented by Motorola at the time).

    All G5's are IBM processors.

    BEN
     
  11. strider42 macrumors 65816

    strider42

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2002
    #11
    I might be remembering wrong, but aren't the G3 and G4 based on different cores. Wasn't the G3 based on the 603 core and the G4 the 604 or something like that. I don't think the Saraha G3's are "basically g4's without altivec" I think there are bigger differences betweent he two chips, thought they are closely related. I think IBM were the ones that introduced the copper G3's, and I'm pretty sure they've been the main (only?) supplier of G3's to apple for quite a while.
     
  12. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

    Joined:
    May 19, 2002
    #12
    Some Macs did have some IBM fabbed G4s, don't think it was anything recent.

    IBM fabbed some processors for Motorola when the yield was really low, but they really are not IBM processors, I don't think IBM ever offered any G4s for sale as IBM G4s.

    IBM helped Apple by churning them out for Motorola, while AMD was Motorola's the tech partner for quite a few of the G4s fab nodes.

    They were both always asking IBM for help, but the G4 fiasco killed the AMD-Motorola fab tech alliance. AMD stuck with IBM, and Motorola went to that other company.
     
  13. leftbanke7 macrumors 6502a

    leftbanke7

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    #13
    I bought an aftermarket IBM G4 chip for my Beige G3 through www.macselect.com.

    Edit: checking the site, they no longer have them so I wonder if it was just a super limited thing.
     
  14. Koodauw macrumors 68040

    Koodauw

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    #14
    What does fabbed mean?

    Also do the iBooks, and PB use the same Proccessor? The clock speeds are different.
     
  15. Capt Underpants macrumors 68030

    Capt Underpants

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    #15
    What does the clock speed have to do with which processor it is? A G5 processor is a G5 processor whether at 1.6 or 2.0 GHz.
     
  16. Macmaniac macrumors 68040

    Macmaniac

    #16
    I'm very glad that we did not end up with the Moto G5, it was not even 64bit meaning we would be years behind the PC market, it also had a bus speed of around 600-700mhz, which is a lot less, and it was limited in RAM! I'm so glad Apple dumped Moto when they made the G5, now all IBM has to do is deliver the new G5s!
     
  17. idkew macrumors 68020

    idkew

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    where the concrete to dirt ratio is better
    #17
    Fabricated, made, built, constructed...
     
  18. iMeowbot macrumors G3

    iMeowbot

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2003
    #18
    The Moto/Freescale G5 does exist, but it's got little in common with that IBM and Apple are calling G5. It's an embedded processor family (85xx), not intended for desktops. There are no new desktop processors in the Moto roadmap beyond G4, they are concentrating on embedded and communications applications.
     

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