Germans elect first woman chancellor!

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by EricNau, Nov 23, 2005.

  1. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

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    #1
  2. russed macrumors 68000

    russed

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    #2
    lets hope she does to their economy what the great Mrs. T did to ours.

    a good place to start would be the trade unions!!
     
  3. Tymmz macrumors 65816

    Tymmz

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    #3
    Let's hope the best.

    After 40 years we have a great coalition again. We need to wait what's coming up next. It will be very exciting to see what changes they bring and how much money will be left in our pockets.

    The only one I'll be missing is our foreign minister Joschka Fischer. I think he did a great job. He was the most popular minister since his first election in 1998.

    I don't care about Merkel (CDU). Her party scrwed up during the last weeks of their election campaign. In the end they had only 1 % more votes than the former ruling party (SPD). hehe! A couple weeks / months before the election they were up to at least 10 % (couldn't find a good chart).

    [​IMG]
     
  4. iGav macrumors G3

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    #4
    Let's hope not 'eh. ;)
     
  5. russed macrumors 68000

    russed

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    #5
    aah well it cant get much worse for the germans can it! :)
     
  6. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

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    #7
    Do you mean help weaken the manufacturing base of this country and promote a predominantly service-based economy that is vulnerable to outsourcing?

    I would hope that the German people have more sense than that.

    Besides, I thought the German economy's main problem was the continuing cost of reunification.
     
  7. Tymmz macrumors 65816

    Tymmz

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    #8
    True!
     
  8. russed macrumors 68000

    russed

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    #9

    well yes, but you only need to look at the sources of the likes of Germany's and Frances problems - their economies are less flexible to external shocks. this is down to trade unions. we would be where they are now had mrs. t not tackled the root of the problem. in germany, their productivity levels have plummeted due to the fact that the TU's resist modernisation changes.

    their other problems are the high level of cover that their social security provide - they do not enduce people to go out and to look for work. and the other problem - the euro.
     
  9. takao macrumors 68040

    takao

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    #10
    yeah sadly that argumentation stops working with Austria where the economy isn't running as bad ;) in fact there where more work blockades fro mthe bg unions in the last 6 years than in the years since ww2 combined
     
  10. Tymmz macrumors 65816

    Tymmz

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    #11
    Sounds good, but the export business is doing extremely well, more than well. It's a really strange situation right now. People get fired even if the company makes more profit than usually.

    You are right, our health care system is a big money hole in every aspect, but other countries also offer a very social health care system and they ain't doing as bad as we do.
     
  11. russed macrumors 68000

    russed

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    #12
    i will be honest and state now i dont know alot about post ww2 austrian politics, and even less economic data (i.e. none!) so i cant argue with you on this, however, it is well regarded that mrs. t's tacking of the TU's and social payments made the british economy what it is today, otherwise we would still be stuck in the state that we had in the 1970's which kind of reflects the problems germany is having now. the difference between the UK's economy and most others in the euro zone (apart from the euro) is that the Uk has a far more flexible labour market and hence has enabled it to keep away from the stagnation (to a certain extent) that europe has seen in the past years. and to the labour fans here - no it isnt due to the ever cheerful gordon brown, most of it he inherited from ken clarke.
     
  12. russed macrumors 68000

    russed

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    #13
    well our NHS is a money pit that needs a radical overhaul, but that is another matter, i was more on about unemployment benfits which is one of the main structural causes of the natural rate of unemployment that Mrs. T tackled along with TU's and the other one i cant remember off the top of my head. :)
     
  13. Tymmz macrumors 65816

    Tymmz

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    #14
    Ahhh, okay.

    I would like to comment on that, but my English-vocabulary-capacity is running very low now and the whole thing is really extensive. I would like to go more into this, but right now it's to hard for me to explain my position. Sorry.
     
  14. russed macrumors 68000

    russed

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    #15
    i shall let you off then :D your english is far far far far better than my german!

    i appologise anyway, i was getting into my economics mode, i am currently writing an essay on the productivity gap so i am 'tuned in'!
     
  15. Tymmz macrumors 65816

    Tymmz

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    #16
    Nahhh, I enjoy these kind of discussions a lot. But it's just getting too heavy!
     
  16. dmw007 macrumors G4

    dmw007

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    #17
    Very nice...perhaps we will have a female president in the U.S. someday soon.
     
  17. 2nyRiggz macrumors 603

    2nyRiggz

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    Thank you Jah...I'm so Blessed
  18. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

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    #19
    You speak like someone who's never had a job, been laid-off, unemployed or seen your wages cut.
     
  19. ecche macrumors regular

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    #20
    if there is anything wrong with Germany it is that its people do no longer BELIEVE the country is economically successful. as others have mentioned before there are of course some faults and shortcomings (trade union, social security, reunification etc) but none of these factors have really stopped the wheels the industry. in fact, the industry is doing quite well. it is the domestic spending that has caved in as people are afraid to spend any money and that slows down the economy.
    look at the house prices: they are soaring the world over, but in Germany they have plummeted.
    other countries have had some success recklessly throwing overboard everything they had achieved over decades if not centuries. The UK being a case in point as is New Zealand. Here, the economy is booming but for what price? it's dog eat dog here, virtually not much of social security around really. so, when the economy is going to slow down - and it will slow down sooner or later, there are signs of it already - then it's going to be a hell of a wake-up for many a kiwi!
    I for one would wish that Germany will not follow these examples. hopefully angela merkel sees this the same way
     
  20. EricNau thread starter Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

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    #21
    All who are saying how poor the German economy is... it is still one of the largest in the world.
     
  21. EricNau thread starter Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

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    #22
    I hope so
     
  22. russed macrumors 68000

    russed

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    #23
    trust me i have experienced the effects of unemployment, not personally but in the family.

    you seem to think there is a magical economy where none of this happens? its economic fact that our labour market is more flexible.
     
  23. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

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    #24
    What does that mean to you? Flexible — in the context of employment law.
     
  24. russed macrumors 68000

    russed

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    #25

    less barriers, both in terms of structural i.e. weaker TU powers so that they can not artificially hold wages higher against the cycle of the economy, restrict employment, resist job losses, strike, fight modernisation in working practices. and also concequentially i cant remember the facts behind it but basically its easier to 'hire and fire' - but no where near as bad as in the US. also the social services - germany and most other european countries pay substantially more in unemployment benefits which then reduce the incentive to activly seek work. at least in the UK his royal tonyness has actually taken a more tory approach in targetting benefits for those attempting to look for work. so benefitting those that try (it also applies to other areas of social security). this all forces people to go out and activly show they are looking for work otherwise they dont get anything (or as much).

    i could go into the full spiel on employment if you really want.
     

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