get caught downloading music

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by boxmetogo, Aug 3, 2004.

  1. boxmetogo macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    #1
    hey a friend told me that you can get caught through iTunes. cause it contains all the music you download in it. he said its cause you download it illegally so iTunes is connected to mac so you can get caught is this true. and if it is. then should we keep iTunes? and whats a good software to use if not iTunes. let me know.
     
  2. fowler. macrumors 6502a

    fowler.

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2004
    Location:
    Pasadena
    #2
    I'm a little unclear as to what you're saying?

    You think that if you have illegally downloaded music in the same folder that iTunes downloads to, the actual program will report to the RIAA that you're stealing material?

    I don't see a reason for Apple to do that at all.. and I don't know how iTunes would differentiate downloaded music from music that you ripped yourself.
     
  3. SolidGun macrumors 6502

    SolidGun

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2004
    Location:
    Twin Cities
    #3
    I don't believe that process is legal at this time....I don't exactly remember the agreement for iTunes usage, but if that was included someone would have mentioned it and I would have read about it by now.
    They are ATTEMPTING to pass that law though.
     
  4. scottwat macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2003
    Location:
    Ohio USA
    #4
    WTF?

    I suppose any jukebox that holds your music could be used against you. Especially if the feds knock your door down and go looking at your computer because your ex girlfriend wasn't satisfied with your performance in bed and all you ever did was download music so she turned you into the riaa. I would worry more about your ISP seeing downloads or the riaa catching your through your downloads. Why would apple care that you have a pirated copy of barbara streisand's greatest hits on your computer?
     
  5. jsw Moderator emeritus

    jsw

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2004
    Location:
    Andover, MA
    #5
    As noted above, there's no way to know that files already on your system have been pirated. Well, there's some watermarking technology, but it's not too useful. You're infinitely more likely to get caught downloading it, as was also mentioned above. And, even so, the odds are in your favor.

    I'm not condoning it. Just saying that, yes, you can get caught, but not via iTunes.
     
  6. scottwat macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2003
    Location:
    Ohio USA
    #6
    If anything...

    iTunes and the ipod are very "forgiving" for lack of a better word when it comes to pirated music. As are most mp3 jukeboxes and players. They really have to be is they want to stay in business. The fact is piracy drives the market. And not just in the consumer electronics market but in the music market as well. The great thing about piracy is weeds out the crap. You dont need to buy a record with 2 good songs and 10 crappy ones. But why debate policies. But really if you want to be safe and make sure no one sees the songs you downloaded illegally you should wrap your computer in aluminum foil, make sure no holes are left in the foil, because it is probable that the wireless systems and rfid systems built into your computer are secretly sending the data back to the riaa. We must protect ourselves imediately!!! BTW the reynolds wrap non stick works the best for shielding since it has the teflon coating!
     
  7. jsw Moderator emeritus

    jsw

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2004
    Location:
    Andover, MA
    #7
    You forgot the most important step: make an aluminum foil pointed hat (tin foil is better, but hard to find anymore). Keeps your brainwaves in - don't want the RIAA to even know that you're thinking of pirating music.
     
  8. Nspace macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2004
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    #8
    Well even an ISP, I don't think, has the man power to monitor what all of their customers download. There is just too much data passing through them. Perhaps they could if they for some reason narrowed down on a single user.

    But yeah i doubt itunes reports to the RIAA as stated above, or people would be getting busted left right and centre.
     
  9. Horrortaxi macrumors 68020

    Horrortaxi

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2003
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #9
    It's not true. It surprises me that you even entertained the idea "just cos somebody said so." Don't people look for proof anymore?
     
  10. maradong macrumors 65816

    maradong

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2003
    Location:
    Luxembourg
    #10
    unpossible to parse, please check syntax
     
  11. jtgotsjets macrumors 6502

    jtgotsjets

    Joined:
    May 20, 2004
    Location:
    Lawrence, KS
    #11
    it seems as thought that is exactly what he is looking for.
     
  12. superbovine macrumors 68030

    superbovine

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2003
    #12
    Before you learn the answer to this question, you need to learn how to write a complete sentence.
     
  13. Makosuke macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2001
    Location:
    The Cool Part of CA, USA
    #13
    Not entirely true; no ISP in its right mind would try to manually monitor customer browsing habits, and I'm not even quite sure that would be legal. But if they wanted to, they could easily look for activity on certain ports or to certain sites that indicated fileswapping, and they'd hardly need to have somebody sitting there staring at network traffic to do it--you'd be surprised what automated data collection and filtering can do these days. This is what lead some ISPs to block certain ports that filesharing programs use--if 20% of the traffic on your network goes through port 6999, and you're pretty sure 99% of that isn't legal anyway, you might just block port 6999 entirely to save yourself some money in infrastructure costs.

    That said, how people actually get sued by the RIAA is exactly the opposite; the RIAA monitors exactly the same networks that people use to file swap. They look for folks sharing a big ol' collection of songs, log their IP address, then subpoena the ISP that owns that IP address to tell them who was using it at that time, so they can sue a person rather than a random IP on the internet.

    Almost all ISPs really don't want to give out this information--tattling on your customers doesn't exactly breed loyalty--but so far most have caved under legal pressure. So it's not the ISP you have to worry about--they log everything you do, but outside of huge bandwidth use by a single person, don't care, either--it's people who look just like other fileswappers.
     
  14. Horrortaxi macrumors 68020

    Horrortaxi

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2003
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #14
    I meant seeking proof for yourself rather than accepting what people tell you all the time. Us telling him iTunes doesn't rat you out is just the same as his friend telling him that it does. We happen to be right, but how do we know? I assume somebody ran little snitch and saw what iTunes calls out for (CDDB access, iTMS, radio stations, version check). In other words, somebody gathered some evidence to draw their own conclusion.
     
  15. Vector macrumors 6502a

    Vector

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2002
    #15
    don't you mean impossible? :)
     
  16. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2002
    Location:
    London, England
    #16
    Learn how to sting a paragraph together then come back and post. That makes no f**king sense what-so-ever!!! :rolleyes:
    [​IMG]
     
  17. bigandy macrumors G3

    bigandy

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2004
    Location:
    Murka
    #17
    ahem yes.

    *shuffles the guy back into the mental home*
     
  18. Mitthrawnuruodo Moderator emeritus

    Mitthrawnuruodo

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2004
    Location:
    Bergen, Norway
    #18
    Since everybody else has dealt with the syntax, I'll try to actually answer the questions (the way I understand them):

    iTunes will NOT report anything to anyone, either via Apple nor directly to RIAA. The first problem: How would it even be able to separate pirated music from CDs you've ripped yourself (specially ripped by other apps.)?

    Yes, you should keep iTunes, and there are no jukebox programs (on any platform) which gives you equally functionality and ease-of-use...
     

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