Getting Rid of Classic

Discussion in 'Mac OS X 10.3 (Panther) Discussion' started by mms, Apr 18, 2004.

  1. mms macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2003
    Location:
    CA
    #1
    Is there a way of completely uninstalling Classic short of reinstalling the entire system? My brand-new iBook came with Classic installed, but I'd like to get rid of it for extra disk space since I will most likely never use it.
     
  2. HexMonkey Administrator

    HexMonkey

    Staff Member

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    Feb 5, 2004
    Location:
    New Zealand
    #2
    Open your disk, drag 'System Folder' to the Trash, and then empty it.
     
  3. Horrortaxi macrumors 68020

    Horrortaxi

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2003
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #3
    For the 200-300MB it takes up I'd keep it just in case you need it one day. But if you must get rid of it, drag the system folder and os 9 applications folder to the trash.
     
  4. HexMonkey Administrator

    HexMonkey

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2004
    Location:
    New Zealand
    #4
    That's right, I forgot about the OS 9 applications folder.

    Mms, as Horrortaxi said, there's not a lot of point in deleting it unless you need the extra space. If you do delete it though, and later find that you need it again, it can be reinstalled from the software restore disc.
     
  5. settledown macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2003
    Location:
    pittsburgh
    #5
    one tip...

    copy the fonts over to your osx library, sometimes osx uses the fonts from the os9 system...

    just in case
     
  6. MacRAND macrumors 6502a

    MacRAND

    Joined:
    May 24, 2003
    Location:
    Phoenix AZ USA
    #6
    Leave Classic, dump localized languages (foreign) instead

    I AGREE.
    Leave Classic alone for the rest of 2004; after that, if you don't care - trash it.
    When I replaced the super sloooow 4200 rpm 30GB hd with an Hitachi/IBM Travelstar 60Gb 7200 rpm hard drive, I neglected to load OS 9.2.2 which had been installed on my original Mac.
    I thought about it for 3 seconds and said, "oh well, at least i've got Classic" and will do like I suggest for you, dump it after 2004.
    I still have archival stuff I refer to once in awhile, but I have Mac OS roots going back to 1991.
    If you have NO OS 9.2.2 software or data, trash Classic. However, leaving the 400 MB on your drive is nothing really, just like Horrortaxi suggests.

    Instead, dump all the foreign languages Apple put on your drive and that you will never use and that takes up as much as 900 MB. DOWNLOAD: DeLocalizer 1.1
    Soon, OS X will become a relic as Apple focuses on G5 and 64-bit only software in OS 11. Think not? ;)
     
  7. Sparky's macrumors 6502a

    Sparky's

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    #7
    Also if it's a "brand new" machine then re-format the HD and re-install OS X and disable the Classic option. This will do a clean install of OS X and not OS9. It shouldn't take that long and if you back up you don't loose anything. (except preferences)
     
  8. Koodauw macrumors 68040

    Koodauw

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2003
    Location:
    Madison
    #8
    I would say trash it now. Steve Said the transition is over. I formatted and never installed 9. I have no need for it, most people don't. Why wait untill the end of 2004?
     
  9. Bear macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Sol III - Terra
    #9
    I also reinstalled my new machines without classic when I got it. (Among other customizations.)

    It's not just the space classic takes up, it's also the space taken up when you install Apllications that have seperate OS 9 and OS X support bits like Photoshop 7. (for example) Depending on what you are running, the space aken up could be a few gigs for OS 9/Classic support.

    People tend to know when they do and don't need classic anymore.
     
  10. MacRAND macrumors 6502a

    MacRAND

    Joined:
    May 24, 2003
    Location:
    Phoenix AZ USA
    #10
    I think you missed the point of having Classic.
    If you have Adobe Photoship 7, loading it in OS X means you don't have to load it in OS 9.
    If you have a non-OS X appication, then hopefully it will install in Classic, which is where you go if and when you need it.
    Classic is more a failsafe, not a platform.
    Starting up in OS 9.2.2 is a platform for archaic software.
    Once you convert or update that app into OS X, then you should remove the obsolete app. I not only have dumped 3rd party software, but even iMovie, iDVD, iPhoto and iTunes in 9 since I have it in 10.
    Also, when I migrated Entourage from 9 to X, after I made sure all the data had successfully transfered, the 9 version of Entourage got trashed.

    It's like weeding a garden.
     
  11. mms thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    Oct 8, 2003
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    CA
    #11
    I see that the Delocalizer page says it hasn't been tested for compatibility with Panther. Has anybody here tried it and had any problems?
     
  12. Duff-Man macrumors 68030

    Duff-Man

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2002
    Location:
    Albuquerque, NM
    #12
    Duff-Man says...Seems to have worked just jim-dandy for me....oh yeah!
     
  13. Bear macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Sol III - Terra
    #13
    I understand that with Classic, you only need to load an OS 9/PS X compatable application once until OS X and it works in both places.

    I know the point of Classic. My point was that some Applications when you install them in OS X, install the extra files needed for the Application running under Classic only if Classic is installed.

    So if you don't have Classic installed, less stuff gets loaded on the disk. There are still bits for Classic support, but it skips all the files that get loaded in the Classic specific directories.
     
  14. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Location:
    USA
    #14
    Let's clear this up. Some applications have two versions, a MacOS X version and a separate MacOS/Classic version. M$ Expression 3.3 is one of these. Some come in Carbon which will run on MacOS 9/Classic or MacOS X at the user's discretion. The default is usually MacOS X. However, you may launch a Carbon app in Classic if you check "Open in the Classic environment" checkbox in the "Get Info" dialog box. There are two "Classic specific directories," only one of which is required. The required directory is "System Folder," which usually resides at the root level of your primary hard disk. This folder has the big "9" in its icon. It is the standard System Folder that Mac users came to know and love sometime before the Flood. The other is "Applications (MacOS 9)." Apple places all of its bundled Classic apps and utilities in this folder. The "Applications (MacOS 9)" folder is optional because its only function is to serve as an organization aid for the transition from MacOS 8/9 to MacOS X 10.0.
     
  15. Anaxagoras macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2004
    Location:
    Denver, CO, USA
    #15
    Some (relatively) old games use OS9 for installation. Two games I know for a fact that do this are the Blizzard games Diablo II and Starcraft. Both require OS9 to install, and both have patches that update them for OSX compatability.

    Just another reason to potentially keep that 400mb of info on your disk ;)
     

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