Handbrake speeds?

Discussion in 'Apple TV and Home Theater' started by malikk, Nov 16, 2010.

  1. macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2008
    #1
    Hello,
    I was curious what everyone gets for taking a DVD (Out Cold for example) which is a standard I think 1 hour and 30 minute DVD and putting it on your computer.

    I am using handbrake... Normal settings preset on a 2010 macbook with 4gb ram. It is about half done (a little less) and it still says their is an hour left. I know this won't be a 5 minute and you are done deal. I am just trying to get some Nice quality but I do not want it to take forever... As I want to put my entire library on my hard drive (about 30-60 DVDs... I may get rid of some as they were "impulse" buys, I will probably never watch again).

    So I guess I am just wondering, if there is anything I can do to speed up the process... while not destroying my video quality too much (I am not the type of person who NEEDS the best HD etc. etc. etc. quality. Still working off composite video with a .. oh man.. 10+ year old tv?). Although eventually I will be getting a nice LCD tv and possibly Apple TV 2 depending if internet media stream becomes a possibility (with jailbreaking or not).

    If you need any other information, please ask! I think I gave you everything you would need to give me a "estimate". I do understand though you may just be speculating compared to your own observations.

    Thanks!
    Qua Sar
     
  2. macrumors 65816

    wheezy

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2005
    Location:
    Alpine, UT
    #2
    I used a 2Ghz Macbook a few years ago and handbraking was about real time; 2 hours for a 2 hour movie. I think most dual core setups run around this time.

    I rip everything on the Apple > Universal preset they offer.

    More cores will speed up the process a lot, my 2.8x8 MacPro can do a 2 hour movie in 15-20 minutes.
     
  3. Cave Man, Nov 16, 2010
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2010

    macrumors 604

    Cave Man

    #3
    If you don't use the h.264 option it'll encode a lot faster. But the file size will be a lot better with h.264. Trade-offs all around.
     
  4. thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2008
    #4
    What is better than h.264? And how much bigger are we talking about for filesize? Roughly.
     
  5. macrumors 604

    Cave Man

    #5
    Not much is better than h.264. It's a compression algorithm - and compresses multiple frames into one, if possible. But that requires a lot of processor effort to encode/decode, which is why it's slower. File size can be half or a quarter as much, but a 2 hour encode in h.264 may only take 30 min as a conventional MPEG-4 file.
     
  6. thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2008
    #6
    Ah ok.

    And will a mpeg4 audio/video (whatever audio the natural handbrake does ... i think it's 5.1 dolby) work on an apple tv. I do not want to have to re-encode all of the movies IF i end up getting a apple tv.
     
  7. macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    May 2, 2010
    Location:
    Berlin, Germany
    #7
    Hi,

    If I recall correctly, the "normal" preset, using h264 as video codec. try changing that to the other option MPEG-4. I noticed that when I switched that, my encoding time drop dramatically.

    EDIT: Ops noticed someone already told you about the MPEG. and It works on my AppleTV 2nd generation. Also try iFlicks, it does metatagging and encoding. when I download .avi i used to encode them with handbrake (MPEG) for speed but now I use iFlicks to do the job. First its amazing at metatagging and when I use the "HD 720p" Preset, it converts the files to a .mov which are smaller than the original by 1/3 and work great on the new appletv, and no signs of video loss.

    Thanks
    AE
     
  8. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2010
    #8
    On avg I get around 35-50 minutes using High Profile which uses H.264. I liek this one becuase i get the AAC/AC-3 audio into my file which of course takes longer. But then the movie is capable of playign on Apple TV 1/2 with dobly digital sound(5.1) but also has sound in stero to play on computer and iPad...

    i7 Core with 8 Gig mem.
     
  9. macrumors 68030

    From A Buick 8

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Location:
    Ky Close to CinCinnati
    #9
    I have been using the High profile setting also and most of my encodes have been 30 to 40 min and the file size was around 2 gig on average. I have done about 300 DVD's so far.

    However I just did "Saving Private Ryan" and that one took almost 2 hours and the file size was 3.91 GB, by far the biggest file and longest encode time i have had yet.
     
  10. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2010
    #10
    You should try BluRays. Some of them take between 4 and 5 hours on a quad processor machine.
     
  11. thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2008
    #11
    Wow wish i had an i7 8gigs, haha. Or rather a Macbook Air that'd be awesome even if it would probably then take longer to encode, haha.

    I am starting to encode at mpeg4 with AC3 5.1 ch audio codec AAC.

    Seems to be going pretty fast (faster than most things i encode)... hopefully it will work on an apple tv 2 whenever I get one (down the rode, haha).

    One day, I will learn to just buy things by digital download. I still get DVDs though. Seems safer than putting all I own on a hard-drive. I guess if I do itunes or amazon video download though, you are able to redownload if you lose the video.

    Thanks for your input so far guys!
     
  12. macrumors 68040

    tbayrgs

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2009
    Location:
    Florida, USA
    #12
    That's nothing. Try encoding blu-rays at 720p on a 2.0 C2D Mac Mini---8-10 hours while 1080p is a good 16-18 hours.
     
  13. macrumors 604

    chrono1081

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    Isla Nublar
    #13
    FYI for everyone talking about RAM encoding uses the processor way more then the ram.

    I get awesome times on the macbook pro in my sig. Using the Apple TV present I can do a DVD in 15 - 25 minutes (some as low as 8 minutes!!!) and Blu-Rays between 45 minutes (if using MakeMKV) to 4 hours if using Aunsoft (although I prefer Aunsoft)
     
  14. macrumors 604

    chrono1081

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    Isla Nublar
    #14
    Oops I noticed you said Handbrake. Not sure about encoding a blue ray in handbrake : /
     
  15. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2004
    #15
    My quad core i5 can encode a 2 hour movie in about 30 minutes :D
     
  16. macrumors 68040

    ntrigue

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2007
    #16
    That's honestly the perfect ratio. I have needs coming next year but for now my i5 is for ripping movies.
     
  17. macrumors demi-god

    CWallace

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    #17
    My i7 iMac can chew through a DVD rip at around 80-90 frames per second using the default AppleTV profile.
     
  18. macrumors 68040

    ntrigue

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2007
    #18
    I'm seeing 145 fps on FFMPEG AppleTV settings.
     
  19. macrumors 68000

    slipper

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    #19
    Whats the difference in quality using a MP4 container with a H.264 codec versus a FFmpeg codec?
     
  20. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2006
    #20
    H.264 has a much higher quality/bit ratio than mpeg-4. So with h.264 you file will be smaller but with the same or better quality.
     
  21. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2010
    #21
    But what is your resulting file size?
     
  22. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2010
    #22
    It takes me about 45 minutes to encode a movie on my 2009 2.66 GHZ, 4gb ram, macbook pro and around 30 minutes on my i5 imac. What I do is first rip the movie using DVDFAB through parallels. It only takes 10 to 15 minutes to rip the movie and then I archive the original dvd file to another hard drive after converting it. I think it's better this way plus you are not using your dvd drive as much.
     
  23. macrumors 68030

    From A Buick 8

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Location:
    Ky Close to CinCinnati
    #23
    What settings do you use in HB
     
  24. macrumors 68040

    Pressure

    Joined:
    May 30, 2006
    Location:
    Denmark
    #24
    Using High Profile (and the much superior H.264 encoding) on my Mac Pro (early 2008) it usually takes between 1.5 hour to 3 hours depending on the source.

    As an added bonus it also means smaller files. 5GB-8GB mkv's usually compress to around 2GB for 720p, which is perfect for streaming.
     
  25. macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2010
    #25
    intersting info guys! thanks! takes me a little under 2 hours for a 2 hour movie with my c2d 2.0 processor 4gb of ram. I have been doing quite a bit of dvd ripping as of late i just run it with the normal preset. What am i missing by doing that?
     

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