Handing in iMac for service, Privacy Concerns?

Discussion in 'iMac' started by 2012Tony2012, Dec 13, 2012.

  1. macrumors 6502a

    2012Tony2012

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2012
    #1
    Handing in my iMac for service, how can I clean and clear out all private activity that shows all websites visited and files opened etc?
     
  2. macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #2
    Apple service technicians don't have the time or inclination to look through your data. They just want to handle your service issues and move on to the next customer as quickly as possible. Your data is far more interesting to you than it is to anyone else.
     
  3. thread starter macrumors 6502a

    2012Tony2012

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2012
    #3
    Can you be 100% sure?:rolleyes:
     
  4. macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2010
    #4
    If the hard drive failed I don't think you can..leaving them able to retrieve and see anything unless I'm wrong?!?
     
  5. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2007
    #5
    When you take your machine in for service, you sign a waiver that releases Apple from all responsibility for the data, including the security of that data.

    For this reason, whenever you go in for service:

    1. Have a full backup (if possible)
    2. Format the disk clean (if possible)

    This is particularly important if some of your data isn't yours - a client's, for example.
     
  6. macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #6
    Nothing in this world is 100% certain, but they handle thousands upon thousands of customer computers. Even if someone was curious, after they've seen a few hundred computers with the same sort of stuff on them, it would get very old. There's nothing special about anyone's data, except in their own eyes. :rolleyes:
     
  7. macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2012
    #7
    It's more than their jobs are worth to go through it. They'll only access what's needed (i.e. if you have an iPhoto issue, then it's reasonable to expect them to open iPhoto). For most hardware problems, they probably won't even boot it into your OS.
     
  8. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    #8
    Do what I did:

    Use Filevault and do not store your key with Apple.

    I've seen them run their in-house diagnostic on such a machine. The drive is unreadable but will pass their diagnostics if there is no problem with it. I think the drive won't even boot at all past the initial password screen.

    Worked out really well when bringing in the iMac for the HDD recall.
     
  9. macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2012
    #9
    Genii have no access to your stored file vault key.
     
  10. macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    #10
    This is a terrible response. You can't be sure of this so stop trying to elude that there is no chance.

    OP, in your case I would clone your drive then reinstall the OS. Let them start with a fresh install.
     
  11. macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2012
    #11

    easy enough to say, but reality is thats not always the case. Go on any tech support site and peopel are always talking about data found on client machines. In fact in the UK Paul Gadd (Gary Glitter was caught after taking his PC into PC world for a repair and a member of staff allerted police to what was on it. Hopefully thats not what the OP is concerned about though :D
     
  12. macrumors 68020

    niuniu

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2009
    Location:
    A man of the people. The right sort of people.
    #12
    Trust no-one with your private data. What's often seemingly innocuous information to you, is a minefield to the wrong person. GGJ Studios lives on Earth2 where people behave like automatons so please excuse his automated response. ;)
     
  13. macrumors regular

    iLondoner

    #13
  14. macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2010
    #14
    You are able to do a fresh install of the OS if something is wrong though?

    I come from window where you get the BSOD the screen of death and if that happens you're done, can't restore or anything. I guess OSX is different which is nice.
     
  15. macrumors 68030

    Steve121178

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Location:
    Bedfordshire, UK
    #15
    Invest in a decent NAS and then you can be sure that your data is stored & secured without having to leave stuff locally on your computer(s).
     
  16. macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    #16
    That is a good point and you know OSX isn't different. ;) You just have a good point. I have a MP, the stock drive is sitting in a box all nicely packed away for a quick swap should I need to take it in. My only issue with the MP was presumably hardware related. I say presumably because they never could figure it out and just gave me a new machine.
     
  17. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2012
    Location:
    Arizona
    #17
    I agree with you 100%.
     
  18. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    #18
    Yes, but I listed the "paranoid" approach. Having Filevault on should be enough.
     
  19. macrumors G5

    gnasher729

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2005
    #19
    Storing the Filevault master key with Apple is no problem. You can't actually store the key itself: You enter three security questions, the key is encrypted with the answers to those three questions, and only the encrypted key is sent to Apple. There is no way to get the key back except by entering the exact same three answers to unencrypt it.


    If you are paranoid, then you can't know that Apple doesn't send the key to Apple behind your back.
     
  20. macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2012
    #20
    I do know that - because there is a massive escalation process in order to get the key. It takes about 5 days, and requires proof of identity to be sent (which you have to be present physically for - you cannot do it over the telephone with AppleCare). And as you said, even if they DO get the key, they can't decrypt it without information only you hold.

    Apple don't have the time or need to go through your personal data.
     

Share This Page