HDTVs and 1080p

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by SuperSnake2012, Nov 13, 2006.

  1. SuperSnake2012 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2005
    Location:
    NY
    #1
    Is it worth buying a 1080p TV for watching digital cable? We bought a 42" Samsung plasma that was a big headache and the store is refunding us. With the money we get back, we can buy a 42" 1080p LCD TV. The TV will be used exclusively for watching HD feeds on TV and maybe Blu-Ray/HD-DVD in the future. Would we be better off buying a 1080p or a 720p TV? Thanks :cool:
     
  2. lord_flash macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2003
    Location:
    Brighton, England
    #2
    In the long run, despite some nay-saying, 1080p is clearly the way to go in the consumer land. Make sure you get a good set, like a Sony, that can upscale from 720p and 1080i content, since most HD broadcasting will be one of these for a while. Blu-Ray, PS3 and the like (even the shoddily built X-Box 360) can put out 1080p (though the X-box has to rely on component rather than HDMI connectivity).

    1080p will do no harm, and is more future-proof than 720p. 1080i only sets are the ones to avoid.

    Oh, and if you hook up a computer, 1080p is obviously more resolution, say for using Front Row on OS X.
     
  3. Jschultz macrumors 6502a

    Jschultz

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    Mar 14, 2005
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    #3

    If you can get a 1080p set, then why not? I sell 2x as many 1080p sets at Circuit City than I do 720p.

    I haven't seen many 1080i sets honestly. We carry a 1024x1080 Hitachi plasma, and that's it.

    I don't put much faith in the 'upconverting' tv sets. Sony has the Bravia Engine Pro (seen on the XBR series) which supposedly 'upconverts'. On a 720p feed, both the XBR and the non XBR (both 1080p sets) looks very, very similar. (the V2500 series).

    But, if you know you'll be buying a next-gen DVD player (bluray, hd-dvd), go for the 1080p.
     
  4. Old Smuggler macrumors 6502a

    Old Smuggler

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2006
    #4
    Not to bash sony but there are others just as good if not better out there
    the xbr2 sxrd is not problemless since hearing about the green blob

    and the sony does not accept 1080p via component it only accepts it via hdmi which xbox doesnt have

    JVC uses the same LCOS technology and presents no problems that i know of
    except one that JVC and Sony both share "poor cusomer service"

    JVC has been around for a while and has been making Lcos projectors longer than sony

    i own a jvc and its a dang good set
    plus sony silver is a turn off along with those dumbo ears
    but it does make a good picture too they are neck and neck

    the jvc has a better picture but porr user controls
    the sony has great user controls but not as sharp a pic as the jvc

    jvc can be used as a standalone but is better used as a monitor with a cable box or computer


    i am still not sold that DLP is a good technology until they come out with 3 chip DLP projectors and eliminate the spinning color wheel
    i have enough migranes as it is without having to deal with the ones caused from watching a DLP while im trying to relax

    if you want a projector get a LCOS
    if you want a flat panel get a plasma


    currently i am looking into Pioneer Elite plasmas or panasonic
    both are kings in the plasma world

    or a 70 inch projector to replace my 50" it just doesnt seem as big any more
     
  5. CHAOS STEP macrumors 6502

    CHAOS STEP

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2005
    Location:
    playing tiddlywinks with Kim Jong-un
    #5
    Do not buy a 720p set, that will always have the clock ticking on it.

    True HD is 1080p, hell if you got a PS3 then you wouldn't be able to benefit from the Blu-Ray as on a 720 set you will be forced to watch 480p (SD) or downscaled 1080p.

    BUY A 1080p SET!


    :)
     
  6. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    Jul 16, 2002
    Location:
    Palookaville
    #6
    From what I've read, there's no such thing as "true HD" -- HDTV is bunch of competing standards, no one of which has really been agreed upon by the industry. So in reality, you evidently can't truly "future proof" yourself by buying a 1080p TV if only because it isn't clear how much 1080p content you'll be able to watch over the next few years. Another issue to consider is whether you can see the difference and whether any given set produces a better image, irrespective of resolution.
     
  7. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #7
    And who says commercials don't work.


    Lethal
     
  8. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #8
    HD is a set standard in that there are official resolutions and frame rates designated by the ATSC, but there are many variations w/in that standard. As I like to say, HD is the most un-standard standard of all time.


    Lethal
     
  9. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    Location:
    Palookaville
    #9
    Thanks for the additional technical details. This is the third thread on HDTV in as many weeks. I walked away from the first two very informative discussions having changed my mind about the need to buy a 1080p set -- or any HDTV at this point, for that matter.

    The transition from analog to digital TV has been so incredibly mismanaged. And to think, analog broadcasts are supposed to be discontinued in the U.S. in three years. Yeah, right. :rolleyes:
     
  10. DrStrangelove macrumors 6502

    DrStrangelove

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2006
    #10
    "True HD" is a term coined by Sony I think. Who's pushing 1080p? Oh, I think that's Sony, too.

    Believe me... HD (whether "True" or not) is not limited by 1080p.

    The main difference, I'm told, between 1080p and 1080i will best be seen (and even then minimally) when dealing with video games. Again, or so I'm told.
     
  11. CHAOS STEP macrumors 6502

    CHAOS STEP

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2005
    Location:
    playing tiddlywinks with Kim Jong-un
    #11
    I'm not a SONY tool.

    Honest,

    It's just that 720p was pushed upon us as the standard of HD.

    However, and whilst it is still early days 720p will not be the future of HD viewing.

    Blu-Ray will not support native 720p.

    I don't like that, in fact it is one of the many things that I hate Sony for - that and the fact that they have ruthlessly pursued exporters and importers of their products - see the 'takedown of LikSang' and the enforcement and litigation against many UK importers.

    It's laughable that they do their best to stop many people actually buying their products.

    Same also for the fact that they love Globalisation when it works their way - see cheap price of labour. But not so to the free and open distribution of their products.

    Anyway, that aside a set that supports 1080p will be a more prudent investment believe me, regardless of whether you throw in HD DVD, Blu Ray or HD Broadcasting!
     
  12. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #12
    The switch from analog to digital has been pretty smooth (DVD players, MiniDV cameras, video game consoles, digital cable boxes, etc., all digital devices connecting to analogue displays), it's the switch from SD to HD that's the major PITA as it's all varying degrees of incompatibility. The biggest problem w/the plan to switch to digital b'casts was that the lawmakers grossly over estimated the willingness of consumers to spend thousands of dollars each to replace all their TVs for no good reason. That over estimation just got compounded a 100 fold w/the post-bubble economic problems. If yer out of work the last thing you are thinking about is replacing your perfectly good TV just for the hell of it.

    My opinion on the whole thing is just to wait. Wait for the tech to become more mature and cheaper to buy. Wait for standards to get ironed out (how many $2k+, 3-4yr old HDTVs will have to get replaced because they lack HDMI?). Wait for more HD content to become available. It's not like they are going to stop making HDTVs.

    Some companies use 720p and some companies use 1080i. How do you figure that 720p was "pushed upon us as the standard of HD"?


    You say prudent investment, I say why buy now? Why pay so much for a product today w/such limited usage? In 2 years, when there is hopefully more HD content available, you'll be able to buy a better TV for probably half the price.


    Of course, the big question is after factoring in such things as TV quality, TV size, viewing distance, and your own eye sight can you even tell the difference? And if so, is the difference worth an extra $100? $200? $500?


    Some people see my posts and think I'm anti-HD or fear change or something and it's nothing like that. I'm just pragmatic, and I've worked w/production quality HD so consumer quality HD doesn't really have that "wow" factor for me.


    Lethal
     

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