HELP! Exposure Problems...

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by AvSRoCkCO1067, Jul 22, 2006.

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  1. AvSRoCkCO1067 macrumors 65816

    AvSRoCkCO1067

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2005
    Location:
    CO
    #1
    I could REALLY use everyone's advice on my last "photo shoot" - basically, I'll post one picture a day for the next few days from the shoot.

    The problem with the pictures lies in their exposure. The background is 'hella bright :p '. Any idea on how to fix this - or is it too late? And more importantly, how can I capture shots in the future without the painfully bright, white background behind the trees?

    Savannah, Littleton - CO, July 21st, 2006
    [​IMG]

    BTW - I don't have the photo information at hand, but it was taken with a Nikon D50 and 18-55mm lens.
     
  2. AvSRoCkCO1067 thread starter macrumors 65816

    AvSRoCkCO1067

    Joined:
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    Location:
    CO
    #2
    ???

    This is supposed to be in the Picture of the Day thread?

    Sorry about that - IGNORE THIS THREAD!
     
  3. snap58 macrumors 6502

    snap58

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2006
    Location:
    somewhere in kansas
    #3
    I don't take many pictures of people so I am probably the least qualified to have any input, but I won't let a little detail like that stop me.

    Do you you need so much background, after all it's not that great, and you have a pretty model?

    Put your camera on Aperture priority and leave it there.

    Then (I think) you should get closer and open your lens up to blur out the background. Open it as wide as it will go and move in, and as I've been told, go for the eyes.

    When I do take people pictures, I like to use longer lenses. They seem to do a better job of separating the subject from the background.

    5/21/06
    Canon 5D
    300mm
    F2.8
    1/320
    ISO 400
     

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  4. beavo451 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2006
    #4
    Two words: Fill Flash.

    With Nikon's awesome i-TTL, it makes it easier.

    In a nutshell, meter for the sky and set your settings so it is exposed properly. Your subject will be underexposed. You would then set your flash so that your subject is exposed properly. i-TTL usualy does a pretty good job in calculating flash values.

    Here is an example. The entire scene was well lit except for the couple. They were in shadow, so my flash lit them up for proper exposure.

    [​IMG]

    With your permission, I can give your photo a shot in PS and post it here.
     
  5. DBAlex macrumors regular

    DBAlex

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2006
    #5
    Why dont you just try and play about blurring the background and playing with levels in Photoshop?

    Here I had a (lame) attempt for you... :p

    [​IMG]
     
  6. AvSRoCkCO1067 thread starter macrumors 65816

    AvSRoCkCO1067

    Joined:
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    #6
    Go for it - although this still shouldn't be a thread...it should've just been a post in the Picture of the Day thread...:eek:
     
  7. beavo451 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2006
    #7
    Why should it be part of that thread. I would imagine it would be more constructive to have your own thread.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Nuc macrumors 6502a

    Nuc

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2003
    Location:
    TN
    #8
    That looks a lot better. I wish I new how to us PS correctly...

    Nuc
     
  9. AtlantaGuy macrumors member

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    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
  10. tonyeck macrumors 6502

    tonyeck

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  11. snap58 macrumors 6502

    snap58

    Joined:
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    Location:
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    #11
    Great, i think you just cost me $99.00! : )

    This would solve his exposure problem, however the bigger problem (IMO) is the poor background choice, (with too much in focus), not to mention the yellow swing ropes. Visors over the eyes is always a problem, the camera will always catch that. I do like the picture of the girl though, I think he did a nice job her pose.
     
  12. snap58 macrumors 6502

    snap58

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2006
    Location:
    somewhere in kansas
    #12
    my version

    I didn't spend much time on it.

    Converted to BW (sorry, don't like the yellow ropes)
    used a duo-tone
    made a layer
    blurred
    erase over the subject, you can get a lot more accurate with the eraser than I did.
     

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  13. wilburdl macrumors member

    wilburdl

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2006
    Location:
    Atlanta
    #13
    If you're going to invest a hundred dollars in anything it should be Photoshop elements 4. You should shoot RAW. Process one image underexposed (with a blue sky) and the other over exposed (with the women correctly lit). Combine the two in Photoshop.
     
  14. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    Location:
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    #14
    You're shooting in a dim area and a light background, so with a longer shutter speed, of course the background is going to look a bit bright. You'd need to have that to get a properly exposed shot of the model.

    The 2nd best way to fix the problem is to use a fill flash.

    I think the best way to fix the problem is just not to shoot her with that background. Hold the camera vertically and shoot her portrait style. You'll get less background as well. There's just too much of it.

    Didn't you get the dual kit lens for the D50 so that you could shoot photos of horses? If so, then you can even use your 70-300 mm and shoot her at 70 with the lens as open as you can get it (f/3.5??). I know it wouldn't be practical every time, since you can't always just change lenses and the 70-300mm would have been too long for most shots in a wooded area or for general use.
     
  15. beavo451 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2006
    #15
    Just my opinion on the HDR method/braketing method others have mentioned. Your subject will move ever so slightly so the over layed images will not be as sharp as possible. If you can get a correct exposure in camera, it will produce a more natural (my opinion) photo. The fill flash method is a vital, basic technique that you should be learning anyway as opposed to relying on the computer too much.
     
  16. AtlantaGuy macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2002
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    #16
    PS4 is great; I use it almost daily, but Photomatix may beat it (and PS CS2) in this feature. Take a look: http://www.hdrsoft.com/images/cs2/comparison.html
     
  17. pdpfilms macrumors 68020

    pdpfilms

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Vermontana
    #17
    I'm sorry, but I think those look horrible. Both CS2's and Photomatix's. Maybe HDR's just aren't for me, but those look like videogames on a dusty TV. Just splotchy, all one tone, and completely unnatural. Eek.
     
  18. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #18
    I think they look good AND unnatural. :p

    I wouldn't want most of my shots looking like that, though. The unnatural look wouldn't be suitable for most photos. It's like if you were to eliminate shadows from a photo via Photoshop, and you just think, "Hey, where's the shadow for that pole and bench?"
     
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