help me with uninstalling

Discussion in 'Mac Help/Tips' started by brujo83, Jan 9, 2003.

  1. brujo83 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2003
    #1
    I recently decided that it was time to learn another operating system other than windows. I have an Ibook running os x jaguar. I installed a divx player, that i have decided i dont like, and I dont have a clue how to uninstall it. PLEASE HELP ME!!!!!!
    brujo83@aol.com
     
  2. Gus macrumors 65816

    Gus

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2002
    Location:
    Minnesota
    #2
    Well,

    if you just want to get rid of that program, drag it to the trash, and empty the trash. That should be the end of that.

    Regards,
    Gus
     
  3. Will Jones macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2002
    #3
    I am unfamiliar with OS X (or any Mac OS for that matter), but if that's the correct, most effective way to uninstall a program on a Mac... :eek: . I would have thought that there would be some sort of seperate 'uninstall' app that would, when run, remove the program and (hopefully) all the files associated with that program. ?
     
  4. rainman::|:| macrumors 603

    rainman::|:|

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2002
    Location:
    iowa
    #4
    The only associated file would be a preferences file somewhere, tiny, they are something you don't have to worry about. programs on a Mac don't install tons of crap everywhere, modifying files and such. Just the program itself, or in some cases a folder with the program in it, along with readme files and other things.

    Ah, The beauty of Mac. :)

    Just toss it in the trash and empty it. All gone.

    :)
    pnw
     
  5. Doctor Q Administrator

    Doctor Q

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2002
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #5
    paulwhannel is right. I'll say a bit more, in case anyone cares for more details.

    The icon in the Applications folder has the bulk of the product, so getting rid of it is usually good enough for practical purposes.

    However, if you are compulsive and/or want to be tidy, you could use File->Find (command-F) in the Finder and search for items with the name of your application. You will probably find small recordkeeping and settings (preference) files that you can also throw out. A proper application puts some of the resources it uses in well-defined Mac OS X locations, in addition to the locations inside the application itself.

    For example, if you wanted to delete an application named WhamoEdit, you could simply delete folder Applications/WhamoEdit. But you might also delete files or folders named

    Library/Application Support/WhamoEdit

    Library/Preferences/...WhamoEdit...

    Library/Receipts/WhamoEdit.pkg

    (yourhomefolder)/Library/Application Support/WhamoEdit

    (yourhomefolder)/Library/Preferences/...WhamoEdit...

    For the software that comes with hardware devices (scanners, mice, etc.), there are still other standard locations for files. But whatever File->Find finds is a candidate, as long as it isn't a file you created yourself, e.g., MyComplaintToTheMakerOfWhamoEdit.cwk.

    Finally, many packages leave a receipt file (Library/Receipts/WhamoEdit.pkg, as I mentioned above) that identifies resources used by the application. The pkgInstall command can use this information to find and remove all files for an application. However, read the details at this link because it doesn't always work cleanly.
     
  6. Will Jones macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2002
    #6
    Thanks, guys. All is clear.

    (I can not WAIT until I switch :D)
     
  7. Gus macrumors 65816

    Gus

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2002
    Location:
    Minnesota
  8. brujo83 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2003
    #8
    Thanks everyone this makes things alot easier, glad im learning about macs.
     
  9. redAPPLE macrumors 68030

    redAPPLE

    Joined:
    May 7, 2002
    Location:
    2 Much Infinite Loops
    #9
    ok.

    obvious enough.

    now that my "default" browser is chimera. and safari on the side...

    i want to delete ie. went to the finder, deleted everything with the word "explorer" but 2 files cannot be deleted, because the files "are currently in use".

    but ie is not being used at that moment...

    as one poster said, "... if you want to be tidy..." (or something like that)

    i want to be tidy. go away m$. go away.
     
  10. GeeYouEye macrumors 68000

    GeeYouEye

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2001
    Location:
    State of Denial
    #10
    Oi... that's Microsoft for you. Try logging out and in, and try again. If that doesn't work, reboot. If that doesn't work, go to the terminal and type (without quotes) "sudo rm -r [path and filename here]" and press return. Enter your password and the file will disappear. A word of warning about this though, if you type "sudo rm -r /" your computer will happily self-destruct in a matter of seconds.
     
  11. rainman::|:| macrumors 603

    rainman::|:|

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2002
    Location:
    iowa
    #11
    Really i'd suggest being a little sloppy and leaving these files on there than playing around with sudo if you're not comfortable with it. do NOT use this command unless you're sure you want to-- OS X has built-in safeguards that keep you from deleting things that it needs. It's just a method of making unix user friendly. But the "sudo" command overrides any and all safeguards... so do be careful :)

    pnw
     
  12. mmmdreg macrumors 65816

    mmmdreg

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2002
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #12
    lol using the trash isn't much...but it's a start :)
     
  13. Doctor Q Administrator

    Doctor Q

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2002
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #13
    An often-mentioned tip which is appropriate to mention here:

    When using the command

    sudo rm -r [path and filename here]

    use a drag and drop technique to fill in the path and filename rather than typing it yourself: Type sudo rm -r with a trailing space but without pressing return. Drag the icon of the file or folder you want to delete into the Terminal window. It will be added onto the end of the command. Then, and only then, press return.

    sudo and rm are dangerous, and this technique makes them slightly safer because you can't mistype the path or filename and, when you drag and drop, the Finder will add backslashes where necessary to prevent special characters and spaces from confusing your rm command.
     

Share This Page