Help! Unejectable network!

Discussion in 'macOS' started by psychofreak, Nov 30, 2006.

  1. psychofreak Retired

    psychofreak

    Joined:
    May 16, 2006
    Location:
    London
    #1
    Someone mentioned Sharity on these here forums, so I downloaded the trial. I did not like the look of it, and did not think it suited my needs, so i deleted it almost immediately, but not before it automatically created a network named CIFS, which I can't eject (before and after deleting the program). When I try to eject the error message comes up that says 'The disk CIFS is in use and cannot be ejected'. There is nothing inside CIFS when I click it in finder. I tried turning airport off, but that did not help. Restarting and permission repairing did not work either, any ideas (my mad jew-bot has not arrived yet)?
     
  2. WildCowboy Administrator/Editor

    WildCowboy

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2005
    #2
    I just played around with it, and I'll tell you how I got rid of it. It's a bit complicated, and I don't know if there's an easier way to do it.

    Here is the Sharity manual page...the instructions for removing it are at the bottom, but they're not very extensive because they assume you're pretty comfortable in a Unix environment. So here's a bit more detail on what I did:

    I enabled root using the instructions outlined here. After making sure I had quit Sharity, I logged in as root through Fast User Switching. Using Terminal, I then navigated to the location of the Sharity items (and most importantly the uninstall script)...they were in /Library/StartupItems/Sharity3. I then ran the uninstall script using this command:
    Code:
    ./uninstall
    That zapped everything having to do with Sharity and got rid of the CIFS share. I then went back to my user account and disabled root.

    Note that most non-power users should not have any need to get into root, so it's usually a good idea to leave it disabled, as it can get you into trouble. Just be careful and you'll be fine.

    But please, if anyone knows an easier way, do share.
     
  3. mad jew Moderator emeritus

    mad jew

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2004
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    #3
    psychofreak, did you remove it via the uninstall script? :)
     
  4. psychofreak thread starter Retired

    psychofreak

    Joined:
    May 16, 2006
    Location:
    London
    #4
    I just dragged sharity from the application folder to the trash.
     
  5. psychofreak thread starter Retired

    psychofreak

    Joined:
    May 16, 2006
    Location:
    London
    #5
    Wahoo! That worked! Thanks loads WildCowboy, and also MadJew for helping, you have no idea how annoying that was for me, I like a clean desktop. This forum is just the best, in fact its so good that when my uncle (who I just convinced to switch) asked what apps he needed, I gave him a list, and then told him to use macrumors for his source of help, I think it should be in every 'Guide to OSX' manual there is. There is no way I would have guessed to do that root thing, in fact I didn't know it existed.
     
  6. mad jew Moderator emeritus

    mad jew

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2004
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    #6
    Fantastic. FWIW, if you use the bundled uninstaller script next time, you shouldn't be left with the unejectable network icon. Thank God for WildCowboy's fantastic Technicolor workarounds! :p
     
  7. WildCowboy Administrator/Editor

    WildCowboy

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2005
    #7
    The truly amazing thing is that it wasn't a workaround...you have to be root in order to run the uninstaller at all, and it's all in Terminal. There's no spiffy GUI uninstaller. I hate programs that are easy to install and then make you jump through so many hoops to uninstall...if it's going to require Unix skills to uninstall, I want to know that upfront, so don't make it so darn easy to install it in the first place! :D
     
  8. psychofreak thread starter Retired

    psychofreak

    Joined:
    May 16, 2006
    Location:
    London
    #8
    I had never heard of root, are there any other uses for it except getting rid of pesky apps?
     
  9. WildCowboy Administrator/Editor

    WildCowboy

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2005
    #9
    Basically, root is a superuser account that allows you permission to do anything on the computer. You can view files in any user's account and you can alter system files that are owned by root...the latter can get you into a lot of trouble though. If what you want to do can be accomplished without using root, it's almost always safer to do it that way.
     
  10. psychofreak thread starter Retired

    psychofreak

    Joined:
    May 16, 2006
    Location:
    London
    #10
    Thanks
     

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