Help with "Pin Compatible"

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by aminadab, Apr 20, 2006.

  1. aminadab macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 3, 2005
    Location:
    Portland, Oregon
    #1
    Smart Mac Geeks help, please! Does this mean that if I buy a new Macbook Pro I'll be able to upgrade to a Merom sometime later? Or is this very much uncertain? I'm trying to convince my girlfriend that we should get a new laptop.
     
  2. DeathChill macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2005
    #2
    No, Macbook Pro's used a soldered CPU which means that they can't be upgraded. Only socketed CPU's can be upgraded.
     
  3. thegreatluke macrumors 6502a

    thegreatluke

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2005
    Location:
    Earth
    #3
    The processor on the MacBook Pro is soldered in (or glued down, or something of that nature). This means that you CAN'T upgrade it later.

    But if you want, get the iMac Core Duo. It's basically the same thing as the MacBook Pro, but $700 cheaper. In the iMac, too, you can upgrade the processor as it's not soldered in.

    Edit: DeathChill beat me!
     
  4. generik macrumors 601

    generik

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    Location:
    Minitrue
    #4
    Nope, due to Apple's strong arm tactics the CPU in the MBP is soldered right on.. :mad:
     
  5. aminadab thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 3, 2005
    Location:
    Portland, Oregon
    #5
    Wow, do other notebook companies solder as well?
     
  6. panoz7 macrumors 6502a

    panoz7

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2005
    Location:
    Raleigh, NC
    #6
    Other notebooks (or at least other reasonably sized notebooks) solder the chip in also.

    I don't think that has anything to do with "strong arm tactics" or else apple would have soddered the chips into the iMac and mac mini also.

    I'm pretty sure it has to do with the thickness and weight of the components used in the socket. Holding the chip to the board with solder takes up very little space compared to the physical mechanism used in the socketed method. The MBP, let alone any laptop short of those gigantic dells, would be significantly thicker with a socketed CPU.

    I've heard that theoretically you could solder a new chip into a MBP. I've also heard that unless you're a robot you have little chance of doing so without ruining the chip and the mobo. If you really are that interested in the benefits of Merom then wait. It should only be a few months. Otherwise buy now and enjoy it.
     
  7. savar macrumors 68000

    savar

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2003
    Location:
    District of Columbia
    #7
    There is such a thing as solder re-flow for soldering very fine pitch components. You don't have to be a robot, but it involves baking the components in question in a convection oven...I don't see anybody with an MBP going that far.
     
  8. dr_lha macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2003
    #8
    "Strong arm tactics" :rolleyes:

    Could it be because they had to make the laptop 1" thick, and sticking a ZIF socket in there wouldn't have worked?
     
  9. generik macrumors 601

    generik

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    Location:
    Minitrue
    #9
    Hmm.. considering they took out the DL DVD burner as well, probably cost cutting measures make more sense!

    Even at $1 a machine they saved at least $400,000!
     
  10. caveman_uk Guest

    caveman_uk

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2003
    Location:
    Hitchin, Herts, UK
    #10
    The story I heard is they couldn't get a DL drive as thin as they wanted. You could say it was penny pinching but given the amount of **** Apple have taken over the lack of a DL drive in the MBP's I doubt it's a decision they took lightly
     
  11. WildCowboy Administrator/Editor

    WildCowboy

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2005
    #11
    They also took that out for the sake of thickness...DL burners in the necessary form factor aren't coming out until the fall IIRC.
     

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