Here we go again (racial stereotypes)

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by 63dot, Jan 7, 2014.

  1. 63dot, Jan 7, 2014
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2014

    macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #1
  2. macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

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    They need a captions proof-reader, or a better one.

    The pictures are actually counter-clockwise. :eek:

    Some numbers would be nice, but I guess that why she's teasing the book release? Perhaps they are in there? ;)
     
  3. macrumors 601

    Technarchy

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    #3
    As more Hispanics, Asians and Indians gain finances, influence and political positions, the era of white liberal guilt and political correctness will decline and eventually fall on deaf ears altogether.

    These people have often come from pretty deplorable conditions and carved out a life with lots of hard work and sacrifice. They aren't going to want to hear about how terrible and hard and impossible it is to get ahead because of reasons X, Y, Z.

    The industry of race baiting, victimhood, and political correctness is in for a massive reality check.
     
  4. macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    #4
    WTF is with the thread title and no text in OP? A noob would be crucified for that. You've been here more than a decade.
     
  5. macrumors 6502a

    jnpy!$4g3cwk

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    #5
    Good point!

    2014-2006 > 10

    Q. E. D.
     
  6. macrumors 6502a

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    #6
    Laziness would be my guess.
     
  7. macrumors G3

    Renzatic

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    #7
    Here we go again on our own!
    Goin' down the only road we've ever known,
    Like some drifters we were born to walk alone
    And we've made up our minds
    We ain't wasting no more time
    Here's something to get mad about again.
     
  8. macrumors 65816

    dec.

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    #8
    Original or Remake?

    And just to be controversial: Fool for your Loving is much better with Steve Vai. PRSI-required source: me.

    On Topic: Not sure what to think of this yet.
     
  9. macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    #9

    He had a different account before this one. My statement is correct.
     
  10. thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #10
    I was jefhatfield (political post #1 on Macrumors and somehow not getting banned) here in June 2000 and then retired that handle. I forgot to put in the clarity that this thread deserves but just fixed it. Sorry folks.
     
  11. macrumors G3

    Renzatic

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    There's a remake? I thought it was all Whitesnake.

    What I think: it's a book that might have some good points here and there about how certain cultures emphasize certain positive things, but the delivery is about 15 types of dumb.
     
  12. macrumors 68000

    VulchR

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    #12
    Why would anybody trust law professors to write a book that is basically sociology?
     
  13. thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #13
    On a lighter note, I find it hilarious how "Han" the NY diner owner from "Two Broke Girls" refers to him mom as Tiger Mom.:D

    You don't have to be east Asian to understand the tiger mom thing. It may be the Asians who are most visible in the overbearing mother stereotype but tiger moms exist everywhere.

    Is it worth is for a parent (usually mom) to be so overbearing that their child gets a higher IQ test score and/or grades? Won't the character and hard work of the child foretell success more than lots of As on a report card or high SAT score?

    There's far too many factors that enable success later in life, with luck being a major factor, and I think the pressure being put on Asians to fall into the top ten percent of anything they do as unrealistic. Sure a young Asian child in Vancouver or San Francisco is likely to do very well but what if that child were born in rural China? What if the child wants to be a dancer, singer, comedian, or other occupation not in the narrow traditional confines of doctor, dentist, lawyer, professor, or entrepreneur businessperson?
     
  14. macrumors G3

    Renzatic

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    #14
    For the same reason I expect a heart surgeon to be able to fix my car. Smart people be like all like omnidisciplinarian.

    ----------

    It's all fun and games until a flare gun goes off in his locker, and he gets sent to detention over it.
     
  15. thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #15
    Excellent point. There are plenty of sociologists out there far more qualified to talk about these issues and ironically there's all this attention being given to these two teaching attorneys. What if they wrote a book on spine surgery or quantum mechanics?

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    From my experience, people are either good at one or two things, or so-so at many things. If you are too omni, you will only end up sucking at everything. If you are smart you won't think you can do a lot of things well, but if you think you can do a lot of things that well, then it only shows you are foolish and good at self-deception.

    Our brains, while powerful, are limited and people usually chose to just get by in life and be well rounded or be a specialist. I have known too many specialists who could perform surgery but not even remember what side of the car the pump was on.:eek:

    There's this pesky little thing called the internet, or Google, which has broadened so many specialists in order to make them less awkward and myopic but at the same time but also diverting/broadening people who would otherwise have wallowed in just one interest.

    We are probably a society more drawn to people having many interests and wearing a lot of hats in the workplace. Just like you won't find the one person in town who can serve pizza or Asian food or craft the perfect horseshoe, you won't find the one trick pony specialist in this internet day and age. With Americans averaging four careers over a lifetime these days, the increasingly fast moving aspect of the workplace has rendered most specialists obsolete.
     
  16. macrumors G3

    Renzatic

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    I wouldn't say it's an issue of brain limitations (which, as far as I know, we haven't discovered a maximum knowledge limit yet), but rather one of time. Being considered a true expert at one thing takes a tremendous amount of study and effort to do, and usually takes years upon years to achieve. Considering we've only got so many years to burn, most people only become experts at one or two things throughout their lifetimes. But being a jack of all trades, you only have to learn a superficial bit of everything, and is relatively easier to achieve.

    Though what I was poking fun at above is this recent idea that being an expert at one particularly impressive thing automatically makes you great at something else by virtue of your previous successes. It's bad when other people assume it, worse when people do it themselves. As in, I've got a doctorate in theoretical physics, of course I'm gonna be good at carpentry, cuz comeon...theoretical physicist here. Or hey, you're a brain surgeon, that means you're smart, so can you tell me why I've been peeing blood these last couple of days?
     
  17. macrumors 603

    Tomorrow

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  18. macrumors 65816

    dec.

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    And they also did that with "Here I (we) go again", to be back on off topic. ;)

    So is the success of her book going to be determined on her race?:confused:
     
  19. macrumors 6502a

    jnpy!$4g3cwk

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    No, by her FAI.
     
  20. macrumors G3

    Huntn

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  21. 63dot, Jan 8, 2014
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2014

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    63dot

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    The author, while believing a certain strict Chinese mother approach could help some children reach their potential, can also backfire, too so it's important to know where your child fits. There's no one size fits all approach and not as narrow a career field for the child when they become an adult. Not all Chinese children grow up to be doctors and lawyers only.

    From a TV or internet interview with the author I saw, it appears that she has softened her approach but still wants to talk about this cultural issue. Not all Asian or Jewish kids are micromanaged into being studious overachievers and I hope the author clears this up. FWIW, the Chinese lady who wrote this controversial book is married to a Jewish man and they are both law professors.

    I am curious to see how this book does after it comes out next month. I may get a ebook version and of course I will be reading it with an eye to criticize. I too was raised under that mentality and while not terribly damaging in the long term, I don't think it was all that constructive, either.

    What is strange is that while a lot of Asians are pushed to be a doctor or a lawyer, they often achieve this and make a fraction of what their parents did when they opened up the convenience store or dry cleaning business. If you work that convenience store correctly and in the right area, you will make far more than the average doctor or lawyer. What drives a lot of first generation Asians into such a field (with a small business)is that their English is so bad that they can't even get a job at the local mall clothing store. There's always a limit on the salary of most doctors or lawyers (though high) while a small entrepreneur can keep on expanding forever. I think part of the ethic wants enough money which the doctor or lawyer job will bring, but many Asians will probably prefer the added societal praise a doctor making $200,000 dollars a year makes over the convenience store owner who has a small trio of stores bringing in millions.

    One Asian man I knew went to college, graduated, and topped out at Cisco Systems and made a then handsome six figure salary. He saw how his parents toiled in a convenience store franchise they owned but also saw that the parents made a lot more selling liquor and cigarettes. As soon as he saved up, he got his own franchise and dumped Cisco. To him the prestige of being a Silicon Valley engineer lost its luster pretty quickly and if he was to work that many hours, he might as well be paid nicely for it. He wears a regular convenience store shirt at work, looks like a college student worker, and nobody knows this millionaire is the owner.

    When you are Asian and told all your life to become the white collar professional, the wind gets knocked out of you when you finally study, graduate, and enter the workplace and find many of the other accountants, MBAs, engineers, etc are unfulfilled Asians who thought they would be something special or unique. It's like you are looking into a mirror and you see yourself. Instead of the postwar tailor's sweatshop full of Asians, or large hotel with Asian gardeners (my first job), you are a slave with a desk and necktie and work equally hard and are under-appreciated. You ain't anything big with your engineering or IT degree and an MBA since your quitting will only bring up ten exactly like you to replace you.

    The most important thing, regardless of your ethnic background, is to find a career that fulfills who you are. If being an underpaid screenwriter or musician is what you want, it's better if it makes you happy than being a microchip engineer because everybody in your family heard they get paid the most out of college according to some cheap newsstand magazine.
     

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