Homeschooling

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Astroboy907, Jun 13, 2014.

  1. macrumors 65816

    Astroboy907

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    #1
    *Posted in PRSI vs Community just in case something ends up political. Which it might. Mods, feel free to move this. You won't hurt my feelings :D *

    Perhaps not a social issue, but I was wondering what the general consensus of home-schooling is here. For, against, et cetera. Would you try it?

    Not many people know, but I was actually home-schooled up until my sophomore year of high school. I am currently in public school, but only because I had more opportunities there (the ability to take classes geared toward technical training).

    One of the interesting experiences I had was acclimating to a public schooled environment. School didn't really pose too much of an issue to me, I had had teachers before (at this point I must interject that I was "online schooled" versus true homeschooling, and thus, had partaken in online social interactions with other students). However, I got quite a bit of reaction from other students. Some of the stereotypes applied to homeschoolers were quite interesting. Of course, the top ones were that I had had no social interactions my entire life and thus many were shocked that I was, in fact, "normal" (in a relative sense) and could carry on a meaningful conversation. Others were surprised that I actually was required to do *schoolwork* at home (prompting the ever-repeated joke that all I did was "homework". Courtesy laugh :D) and that I didn't just sit and watch PBS all day.

    Of course there are the jokes about prom (no, homeschoolers usually just go to the nearest high school and dance. No one has prom alone in their house).
    The questions about if you had any friends (yes, I did. In fact, there was a group of homeschoolers in our area that wen't skiing together. Usually on a weekday- homeschool benefit!)
    And so on.

    I could continue of course, but I'd like to hear your opinions. Is homeschooling something you would ever do? Something you have wondered about home schoolers?
     
  2. macrumors 65816

    citizenzen

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    #2
    I always felt that the social aspect of school was almost as important as the academic.
     
  3. macrumors 6502

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    #3
    I think that's a myth about home schooling that the kids have less of a social life than those who go to state schools. They play on soccer teams, participate in boy scouts, got to dances and generally have active social lives. No one I know who was home schooled missed out on having a social life, and generally I don't think they had any regrets about not mixing up their education with typical public school *************.
     
  4. macrumors 604

    Jessica Lares

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    #4
    I think that too. But if your kids feel out of touch with the other kids, then you need to do something about it. I knew lots and lots of kids in elementary school who needed more than just seeing the counselor every week.

    By all means, if your kids don't thrive in public school, do whatever you can to make their education better, even if it means home schooling. Although, I'd seriously consider private schools too.

    And no, I know people who do home school their kids, and they aren't just shut indoors and isolated.
     
  5. macrumors 65816

    iStudentUK

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    #5
    I would not personally consider home schooling, except in extreme circumstances. It isn't very common here in the UK - I have never knowingly met someone who was home schooled. It is legal (subject to certain restrictions) but not really part of our culture, which is personally think is a good thing and don't want to see it encouraged. Frankly I expect a lot of employers would be skeptical here if they saw a home schooled applicant (I know I would be). The big question for my wife and if/when we have kids will be whether to go state or private.
     
  6. macrumors regular

    b3av3r

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    #6
    I noticed two things from homeschoolers coming into my high school classroom. I am not saying this applies to every single homeschooled child just general observations.

    1) My students who were homeschooled were use to working at their own pace (to a certain degree) and found it difficult to budget their time wisely. This was most noticeable during tests. This was something that most kids could adapt to fairly easily and didn't impact the grades much as there are not any major tests in the beginning of the semester.

    2) Illness. There seems to be a period of several weeks that home school kids stay sick. Nothing that keeps them from school but runny noses, coughs, stuffed noses, etc. I think this applies more to kids who are homeschooled for several years and have limited social interactions. Their bodies just aren't exposed to as much as everyone else and need time to build up resistance.

    I don't have any issue with homeschooling and I know it can be just like any education as thorough or bare as the teacher wants to make it. I think some social interactions learned in the school setting are helpful for most kids but not something that will severely limit the kid later in life.
     
  7. macrumors 6502a

    jnpy!$4g3cwk

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    #7
    The bad side of American public education is that your kids will socialize with typical American kids. That is also the good side. Homeschooling allows parents to pick and choose which kids they socialize with. Sometimes that is good-- avoiding, for example, socializing with budding young drug dealers. Sometimes it is bad -- socializing only with other people who think the world was created in 4004 BC.
     
  8. macrumors 65816

    citizenzen

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    #8
    I agree that socializing children can be done in other ways, but I don't see how it could be written off completely as a myth.

    Much will depend on the parents ability to engage their children in social activities, and as we all know, some parents are more capable and inclined to do this than others.
     
  9. macrumors G5

    yg17

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    #9
    All too often you hear about children being homeschooled by unqualified parents who are using it as an opportunity to indoctrinate their kids with religious dogma and teach them fake science like the world is 6,000 years old and some invisible man in the sky waved his magic wand and created everything.

    Home schooling should only be allowed after the parents pass a certification to prove they're capable of teaching their kids, the kids regularly take and pass tests proving they know everything someone in the equivalent grade in a public school knows, and the parents have a better reason than "because Jesus" for doing it.
     
  10. macrumors 603

    Technarchy

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    May 21, 2012
    #10
    Probably not. I don't think I would do all that well, and work wouldn't provide the time needed to really give the energy required.

    However, I do have a school district picked out that has the qualities I am looking for. As a parent, I think my number one priority is to ensure my kids have access to a good education, so we are going deep suburban to a lower population high income area with an excellent ranking for test scores, athletics, and college attendance after graduation.

    I will do whatever I need to and make sure my kids never see this in their high school

    [​IMG]
     
  11. macrumors G5

    yg17

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    #11
    You don't want your kids to see Latino people in their school?
     
  12. thread starter macrumors 65816

    Astroboy907

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    #12

    Gang signs and shirtless males :D
     
  13. macrumors 603

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    #13
    There are so many good school districts with public schools that are better than most private schools and yet people choose to homeschool
     
  14. macrumors 68020

    P-Worm

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    #14
    My ardent libertarian friend has stated he plans to homeschool his children, just because he doesn't trust the government teaching his kids. It has always made me wonder, how do you apply for college when you are home schooled? Not having official grades to weight the student seems like a really bad decision to me.

    P-Worm
     
  15. macrumors 68000

    iBlazed

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    #15
    People are out of their goddamn minds.
     
  16. macrumors 6502a

    jnpy!$4g3cwk

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    #16
    A private, Libertarian college, I guess? List some, and, let's see what their admission criteria are. I would assume that they would give extra consideration to ardent Libertarians. I mean, you would expect Moody Bible Institute to favor evangelical applicants, wouldn't you?
     
  17. Astroboy907, Jun 14, 2014
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2014

    thread starter macrumors 65816

    Astroboy907

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    #17
    Actually, this view on homeschooling really got me pretty pissed about public schooling. Mainly because I was on track to be able to graduate high school in three years, but the public school counselor turned that plan down because she thought I would "benefit" from an additional year of social interactions. So I guess some people really do believe the stereotypes... or maybe I really am socially challenged :D

    ----------

    Yep- home schooling seems to be a USA only kind of thing. Kind of odd, right? But it's (partially) part of the culture here I guess.

    Take the G.E.D? Not sure on this one...
     
  18. macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #18
    Curiously enough, we started our children at a state primary, followed by a private secondary school, followed by home education when our youngest became seriously ill.
     
  19. macrumors 68020

    sviato

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    #19
    What about like interaction with the opposite (same?) sex? School was a great way to meet girls :D and I went to a Catholic high school, so they wore those kilts...

    I can't imagine being homeschooled. Yeah you had friends, but you weren't around people for the majority of the day. Some of my best memories were from things that happened in class with my classmates. Also, how would you skip class? :p
     
  20. macrumors 65816

    iStudentUK

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    #20
    I'm sorry to hear that. Those were the kind of circumstances I was referring to. I hope everything worked out ok.

    Living in London I would probably be looking towards private schooling. However I grew up in a small very middle class town and went to the local state schools, and I wouldn't hesitate to send my (currently theoretical) child there. The quality of state schools by geographic area is quite shocking!
     
  21. macrumors 65816

    Southern Dad

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    #21
    Regardless if you child is in public school, private school or home school the primary teacher for your child is YOU. I know that people disagree with this and come up with all sorts of excuses but it is true. The teacher only has your child as a student for 160-180 days per year and only for a few hours each day. The teacher has 18-22 children during that time. You on the other hand have your child 365 days per year.

    Teachers are expected to do all the teaching and this is a huge failing. When a student fails in school it is the fault of the PARENT, not the teacher. I don't care how busy you are, it is a matter of prioritizing.

    Math is the same for all ages and in all languages. Do you have your child help you with the grocery shopping? Figure the sales tax? How about calculate the square footage in their room?

    Language arts? We use them every day. Do you make sure that your child knows the difference between well and good? These things are YOUR job as a parent. Everything is a learning experience. Thanks to Google we as parents don't have to make up the answers any longer, we can look them up.

    History? Do you drive by the markers on the side of the road without even pausing? Why not stop and read it with your kids?

    Physical Education? Who taught your child how to play baseball and the rules of the game? Football? Basketball? Tetherball?

    Science? Who explained how to freeze water to your child? When water boils? Explained why it becomes night?

    Everything we do each and every day involves education. We just have to take that time to teach our children. We cannot expect teachers to do it all. I'm very active in my child's school. So active that I'm sure the teacher probably wished that I was less active but she didn't complain because she never had to purchase copy paper, white board markers or certain other supplies all year when other teachers found themselves short.

    Become a certified volunteer at your kid's school but remember, the best thing you can do is take responsibility for educating your child.
     
  22. macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    #22
    Despite you having posted this about a half dozen times already, no one is disagreeing with you. Why do you make up these imaginary Internet battles in your head?


    That explains why ****ing Prius drivers are always holding up traffic. :D
     
  23. macrumors 65816

    Southern Dad

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    #23
    Actually, that isn't it. We are holding up traffic because we are carefully driving trying to keep our Prius in economy mode and avoiding losing mpg by pressing too hard on that gas pedal.

    And I'll continue to hammer home the message about parents being responsible for educating their children, as long as I am able to do so. Nothing infuriates me more than a parent who blames the teacher for their child's failing. Even worse? A parent who has never met that teacher, yet holds him/her responsible for their child's failures.
     
  24. macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    #24

    That's wonderful. Now get the hell out of the left lane. :D

    And Happy Father's Day.
     
  25. macrumors 6502a

    skottichan

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    Location:
    Columbus, OH
    #25
    Home schooling's kinda popular here in Ohio (especially southeastern). I had a few homeschooled kids in graphic design courses with me. They tended to have issues with deadlines, and a few of them refused to be "wrong" and would get into screaming matches with a few of the professors. The rest just existed, they didn't really interact with anyone in the class.

    I went to public schools until my freshman year of high school, then I was sent to a girls only Catholic boarding school.

    Honestly, I have to agree with the "myth" that socialization is needed with kids, but it's beyond the whole having your kids play with other kids. I think that randomness and large population of diverse (color, religion, sexuality, socio-economic, etc) kids is what kids need.
     

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