How do i do this on my mac??

Discussion in 'Mac OS X 10.3 (Panther) Discussion' started by Declan, Jun 1, 2004.

  1. Declan macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2003
    #1
    When i had a windows Pc i used to type copy /b file1+file2+file3 output to create a binary file, ISO, how can i do this on my mac..
     
  2. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2002
    Location:
    London, England
    #2
    So all you want to do is create an ISO image containing several files? :confused:
     
  3. Declan thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2003
    #3
    Yup
     
  4. 7on macrumors 601

    7on

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2003
    Location:
    Dress Rosa
    #4
    Put all the items you want in the ISO into a folder

    Launch disk utility

    From the Menu Bar go to Images>New from folder

    Select the folder with the items

    Enter a Save as name

    And Image Format must be DVD/CD master

    The resulting file will be filename.cdr, which you can rename to .iso
    (They're the same thing, that's what the DVD/CD Master are for. If you chose read-only renaming it ISO won't work on a PC because it'll make a HFS+ volume instead of a CD volume, I believe.)
     
  5. Declan thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2003
    #5
    Ok to clear up my misunderstanding, I want to actually join the files.
     
  6. janey macrumors 603

    janey

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2002
    Location:
    sunny los angeles
    #6
    what kind of files are they?
     
  7. Makosuke macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2001
    Location:
    The Cool Part of CA, USA
    #7
    If you really want to just jam the files together end to end into one big chunk (which is, I think, what "copy /b" does), you want to fire up the Terminal and use the "cat" command. The syntax, I believe, is "cat file1 file2 > file3", where the contents of file 1 and file 2 will be joined into file3, leaving the original two alone.

    Check out the man page for cat to get an idea of what the options are.

    There are of course graphical tools to do this, but cat is the closest to the command line tool you mentioned before.
     

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