How do I play multi region DVDs on mac?

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by ozimax, Apr 4, 2004.

  1. ozimax macrumors member

    ozimax

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2004
    Location:
    Nth Coast NSW
    #1
    My new iBook G4 12" is doing wonderfully well, a quick question regarding software: Is there a downloadable patch etc to enable playing of multi region DVDs after the "5 zone DVD limit" thing?

    I have quite a range of DVDs, about half from USA and half purchased in Australia. Any help would be appreciated, thanks, Max
     
  2. HexMonkey Administrator

    HexMonkey

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2004
    Location:
    New Zealand
    #2
    Try VLC, which usually ignores region codes.

    If it works, you might want to change the default DVD viewing application. Go to System Preferences, then to CDs & DVDs, and in the 'When you insert a video DVD' menu, choose 'Open other application...' and then choose VLC.
     
  3. ozimax thread starter macrumors member

    ozimax

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2004
    Location:
    Nth Coast NSW
  4. bellis1 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2003
    #4
    Patches

    I have been battling with the same issue and inquired a couple of days ago about it. I need this same use for completely legitimate and fair reasons and can produce a record of travel, residency, DVD purchases, etc. (if need be) to prove my point. Anyhow, I have found VLC works to an extent but will not work with every disc. There is a patch available which requires you to flash the version of your superdrive. It turns out that for original PB 17" if you use the patch not only will you increase the drive speed (potentially dangerous) and media compatibility formats but you can also make it drive free. Of course this is likely to void any manufacturer warranties although there does not appear to be any documentation on that as of yet. It could also damage the drive. All warnings aside you can take a look at :

    http://superdrive.cynikal.net/
     
  5. MacFan26 macrumors 65816

    MacFan26

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2003
    Location:
    San Francisco, California
    #5
    Ozimax, any word on if VLC worked for you? I'm curious to know.
     
  6. brhmac macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2003
    Location:
    Planet Earth
    #7
    What exactly would an illegitimate and unfair reason be? If someone buys a dvd, s/he should be able to play it. Sounds legitimate and fair to me.
     
  7. jxyama macrumors 68040

    jxyama

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2003
    #8
    just pointing out... when you buy a DVD, it has the region code on the package. and it would say "For use inside USA/Canada only." (or other regions.) (we all know this already.)

    it is stupid, but it's there. technically, you are circumventing a mechanism that was put in place by the DVD producer, so it could be a DMCA violation, at least for those in the U.S... i think this is what's commonly referred to as "illegitimate" use...

    it's sort of like buying an electronics appliance in a foreign country and claiming plugs won't fit. yeah, you got the product and it should work, but you forgot about the limitations. the difference is, of course, region coding DVD is purely artificial. there's no physical reason it shouldn't work in all regions...

    anyway, good luck figuring out ways to get around. it's fair play no doubt, but it could technically be "illegal"...
     
  8. brhmac macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2003
    Location:
    Planet Earth
    #9
    I think the difference is the TV

    The reason for regional variations, I believe, is the TV. I'm not sure what the technical terminology is, but televisions around the world have different "lines per inch." TVs in the UK, for example, have higher resolution than those in the USA.

    The warnings are designed to ensure the consumer buys a DVD s/he can use. As long as the DVD is legally produced and sold, why should it matter where the consumer lives?

    If I buy a CD in England, it plays in my stereo. Why should my computer arbitrarily decide what legally purchased DVDs I can play if the software already supports it?
     
  9. jxyama macrumors 68040

    jxyama

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2003
    #10
    that's partially the reason. USA/Canada and Japan uses NTSC. Europe is a mix between SECAM and PAL.

    however, the biggest reason is to prevent the unwanted spread of movies. for example, both USA and Japan uses NTSC so there's no technical reason for region encoding between those two countries. however, they are still region encoded. this is because many movies come out in DVD in the USA before they even premier in movie theaters in Japan. hence region encoding...
     

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