How do I restore MacBook to factory settings?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Tacticus, Feb 18, 2013.

  1. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2013
    #1
    Hi, I am looking to sell my MacBook Pro and need to restore it to factory settings, does anybody know how I do this ? I don't have any installation disks (it didn't come with any).
     
  2. Moderator

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    Staff Member

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    Dec 7, 2002
    Location:
    Whakatane, New Zealand
    #2
    Reboot and hold Cmd-Opt-R at the chime to get into Internet Recovery. You will then be able to launch Disk Utility and wipe the hard drive, then reinstall OS X. This process may take more than an hour.
     
  3. thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Feb 18, 2013
    #3
    Great thanks, the reinstall OS X step ..... I don't have discs so would that be from the hard drive ?
     
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    Staff Member

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    #4
    Internet Recovery will download the installer, no DVDs needed.
     
  5. macrumors 68030

    Spink10

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2011
    #5
    I would recommend downloading and creating a bootable OS X Lion/ML thumb drive. Much faster than internet recovery unless you have super blazing internet.
     
  6. macrumors member

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    Jun 28, 2012
    Location:
    England
    #6
    What MBP/OSX do you have?
     
  7. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2009
    #7
    If your computer originally started on Lion, but you manually upgraded to Mountain Lion, what does Internet Restore install?

    Also, while we're at it...how would you secure erase a SSD on OS X?
     
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    Staff Member

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    #8
    Internet Recovery (Cmd-Opt-R) uses the computer's serial number to download the version that it came with. This is not the same as the Recovery System (Cmd-R) which reinstalls the same version as is currently present.
     
  9. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2009
    #9
    Thank you!
     
  10. thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2013
    #10
    Thanks for all the help everyone, I will give it a go
     
  11. macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2012
    #11
    I had the exact same question here (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1543870), but no answers there.

    So I'm happy about finding this thread :)

    Has anyone an idea about the SSD question? (see quote below).

     
  12. macrumors P6

    Weaselboy

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    #12
    That is correct... you don't want to secure erase an SSD. If you want to make sure your data is safe before you sell, just turn on Filevault2 encryption on the drive and wait for it to finish encrypting. Then follow the step in this thread to get to Internet Recovery and erase Macintosh HD, then reinstall the OS.

    When you erase the HD, it will erase the encrypted Filevault2 volume. So even if someone used tools to recover what you erased, it would still be encrypted.
     
  13. macrumors 65816

    PatriotInvasion

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2010
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    #13
    Why does secure erase harm the SSD and why would Apple still provide a secure empty trash feature on SSD-based Macs?
     
  14. macrumors P6

    Weaselboy

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    #14
    The theory is that a secure erase by overwriting with zeros like DU does needlessly adds wear cycles to the drive. If you look at DU on a SSD Mac, you will see the secure erase option is greyed out.
     
  15. macrumors member

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    Jun 21, 2012
    #15
    Thanks! I'll try that.
     
  16. macrumors regular

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    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    #16
    Great information!
     
  17. macrumors 65816

    PatriotInvasion

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    #17
    Secure erase is greyed out in Disk Utility, but you still have the option to "Secure Empty Trash" when emptying your trash bin. Isn't this in fact doing the same thing on a smaller scale?

    And, if secure erase is the way to go for a HDD, how do you prevent recovery of data on an SSD if secure erase is not an option?
     
  18. macrumors P6

    Weaselboy

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    #18
    Yes, it would seem so. A secure empty trash does overwrite the area with random data, so in theory this adds one more "write cycle" to that area of the disk.

    To prevent data recovery with an SSD you can either encrypt then delete like I described in post post above, or you can boot from Linux and run the ATA secure erase command which does not add a write cycle.
     
  19. macrumors 65816

    PatriotInvasion

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    #19
    Thanks. So if you only plan to have the SSD-equipped Mac for say 3 years and only do a secure empty trash occasionally, I'm guessing write cycles shouldn't be too big of a deal?
     
  20. macrumors P6

    Weaselboy

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    #20
    I would not worry about it. There is some good info in this article on the topic.

    This is from the article. Even with the newer TLC NAND, at 10GB writes a day you are looking at over 11 years. So even if secure empty trash cut that back somewhat, the computer will likely be dead and gone before the SSD starts to die.

    [​IMG]
     
  21. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2005
    #21
    Details?

    Can you give a little more detail on this process? I restarted with Cmd-option-R and got into a screen that says Mac OS X Utilities. I choose the Disk Utility option and Disk Utility opens. I have options to Erase or Restore my hard drive. But I don't see where it tells me there is an Internet Recovery option.
    Thanks
     
  22. macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2013
    #22
    You want to select the "install a new copy of OS X" option when the recovery program loads, not Disk Utility.
     
  23. macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2002
    #23
  24. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2005
    #24
    OK. And then there is some kind of Internet Recovery? Because I do not have disks to restore OSX
     
  25. macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2002
    #25
    Yes. If its a newer machine it will boot over the Internet provided you put it on a network. Be patient because it is not fast.
     

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