How does Bootcamp work?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by BKKloppenborg, Jul 4, 2006.

  1. BKKloppenborg macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 2, 2005
    Location:
    La Mesa, Ca
    #1
    Ok guys i know that i install Bootcamp and then i can tell it what OS to use when it boots up i think its the Option/Alt key. I want to use Windows beause this is a Very powerful computer and i have some nice windows Programs i want to use, that my Other Windows Desktop can't run. I was just going to upgrade the desktop but since i sent over 2,000 on this laptop i can't afford it right now lol.

    Questions: Once or if i can install Windows XP how hard/EZ is it to remove?
    Does it use a Emulator like Mac does to run non-Native applications?
    How much should i give Windows for HD space? (I was thinking about 30 GB, then getting a external HD to give Mac more space.

    For those who have used it, how do you like it?

    I wanted to do some games because Mac Macbook Pro can easiley do games i want but software emulator kills them.

    EX Unreal 2004 on Macbook Pro with emulator 9-15 FPS

    Compared to 150-200 On AMD 3000+, 512Mb ram, 128Mb Gforce 6600GT OC

    Someone tell me its worth it becuase everytime i start Bootcamp i can't hit the continue button on Sexy Mac because Windoes would spoil it. :D Tell me im not crazy for not putting Windows on My Sexy Mac lol.

    Thanks
     
  2. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #2
    It's not am emulator. When you install Windows, it's a real install on x86 hardware.
    Windows is just installed on a partition, erase the partition and Windows is gone. It's as easy as that.
    Give it as much as you think you will need if you were running Windows 24/7.
     
  3. Rovman macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 4, 2006
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    #3
    Remember now your MacBook is based on reguar Intel CPU's it is infact itself a PC. The only thing that gets Emulated is BIOS (because macbooks use a newer technology called EFI instead of BIOS) but that's at such a low level it means absolutely nothing. Windows itself runs exactly as it would on any other PC.

    Boot Camp basically partitions your harddisk for you, and burns your Drivers to a disk, that's it. It isn't something that's running in the background, windows isn't running "on top of" boot camp.

    Boot camp is also used to remove the partition and return it to a single Mac partition. If you have used Boot Camp to partition your drives, do not use any other partition tool to mess with the partitions as you may kill both your windows and mac installation.
     
  4. steve_hill4 macrumors 68000

    steve_hill4

    Joined:
    May 15, 2005
    Location:
    NG9, England
    #4
    I find Parallels the better solution for general purpose. Just option and enter it and it goes to full resolution, full screen anyway. Near full performance, runs most apps, easy to switch from OSX and back, without rebooting.

    Because it is contained in a virtual HD file too, I also believe it defends you more against xp-virus-scum™.
     
  5. sjoldzic macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2008
    #5
    BootCamp is not an emulator

    Boot camp itself isnt an emulator. All it simply does is creates a partition for windows to boot on, then it changes the EFI boot flag to boot from disc, since EFI is more than capable of running Windows. EFI has the core of BIOS, plus much, much more to increase effeciency. Its basically BIOS x2. If nothing, Windows should run BETTER on BIOS than EFI. And dont woory, it doesnt touch any of your files. I did it myself so I could play MS Flight Simulator X, and GTA: San Andreas. The only thing is, you HAVE TO give BOTH WINDOWS AND MAC OS X 5GB of disk space. Good luck.


    -sjoldzic
     
  6. dual64bit macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2004
    #6
    Running Bootcamp would allow Windows to take advantage of 100% of the hardware, running native as any PC would. In addition, you could install Parallels on the Mac side, and Parallels can run that identical version of Windows within Mac environemnt. So you have built 1 Windows setup (using Bootcamp), and you can also run it on the Mac without restarting when needed.
     

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