How John Sculley Transformed Apple (1983-1992)

Discussion in 'MacBytes.com News Discussion' started by MacBytes, Feb 22, 2006.

  1. macrumors bot

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2003
    #1
  2. macrumors 65816

    yankeefan24

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2005
    Location:
    NYC
    #2
    where would we be today if sculley was not born?

    "Do you want to spend the rest of your life selling sugared water, or do you want a chance to change the world?"

    not a bad way to get people into your company.
     
  3. macrumors 65816

    runninmac

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2005
    Location:
    Rockford MI
    #3
    I thought this was going to be a brief online bio, but apparently not... gotta save this one for the morning but good first 2 sections.
     
  4. macrumors member

    gbruner

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    Location:
    Sandy, UT
    #4
    fascinating read. I love reading history to see how things managed to get to where they are today.
     
  5. macrumors 68030

    BenRoethig

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Location:
    Dubuque, Iowa
    #5
    Probably not around. He might not have had Steve's sense of innovation and design, but he had business sense like no other. Now, if we could only get a CEO who would combine the two attributes.
     
  6. macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2005
    Location:
    London, UK
    #6
    Well, let's consider these two paragraphs...

    "Sculley had almost no influence over the Macintosh project. Macintosh was Jobs' fief, and he defended it fiercely (often at the expense of the Apple II). Sculley didn't even have control over the advertising campaign, the element of the Macintosh that he was most qualified to work on. He hated the 1984 ad (along with the rest of the Apple board) and joked that the twenty page brochure included in Newsweek was actually an Apple magazine with a Newsweek insert. Despite his qualms, the two ads ran and were incredibly successful.

    John Sculley's two sole contributions to the Macintosh project were the covert funding Macworld, of a Macintosh-themed magazine from IDG. The other was the Mac's price of $2,495, which he raised from $1,500 to maintain an exorbitant 55% profit margin."

    Seems that Steve would have had less trouble getting the 1984 ad run during the SuperBowl, and the original Mac would have retailed for $995 less, probably cleaning up and selling a whole lot faster than it did... that would have changed the world, Apple may have become Microsoft like in proportions by now... too much to speculate on.
     

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